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All Purpose Cycling Thread

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion All Purpose Cycling Thread

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 89 total)
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  • #99574

    Twixlen
    Participant

    I kind of can’t believe there isn’t a catch-all cycling thread, considering how much we seem to talk about it.

    This article came across my twitter feed today, and it captures the heart of what seems to be happening, regarding the growing intersection of cars and bikes, how the law regards them, etc.

    Is It O.K. to Kill Cyclists?

    Inflammatory title – but for good reason –

    Quote:
    But studies performed in Arizona, Minnesota and Hawaii suggest that drivers are at fault in more than half of cycling fatalities. And there is something undeniably screwy about a justice system that makes it de facto legal to kill people, even when it is clearly your fault, as long you’re driving a car and the victim is on a bike and you’re not obviously drunk and don’t flee the scene. When two cars crash, everybody agrees that one of the two drivers may well be to blame; cops consider it their job to gather evidence toward that determination. But when a car hits a bike, it’s like there’s a collective cultural impulse to say, “Oh, well, accidents happen.” If your 13-year-old daughter bikes to school tomorrow inside a freshly painted bike lane, and a driver runs a stop sign and kills her and then says to the cop, “Gee, I so totally did not mean to do that,” that will most likely be good enough.

    “We do not know of a single case of a cyclist fatality in which the driver was prosecuted, except for D.U.I. or hit-and-run,” Leah Shahum, the executive director of the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, told me.

    #554359

    picktown
    Participant

    Twixlen said:
    I kind of can’t believe there isn’t a catch-all cycling thread, considering how much we seem to talk about it.

    This article came across my twitter feed today, and it captures the heart of what seems to be happening, regarding the growing intersection of cars and bikes, how the law regards them, etc.

    Is It O.K. to Kill Cyclists?

    Inflammatory title – but for good reason –

    But studies performed in Arizona, Minnesota and Hawaii suggest that drivers are at fault in more than half of cycling fatalities. And there is something undeniably screwy about a justice system that makes it de facto legal to kill people, even when it is clearly your fault, as long you’re driving a car and the victim is on a bike and you’re not obviously drunk and don’t flee the scene. When two cars crash, everybody agrees that one of the two drivers may well be to blame; cops consider it their job to gather evidence toward that determination. But when a car hits a bike, it’s like there’s a collective cultural impulse to say, “Oh, well, accidents happen.” If your 13-year-old daughter bikes to school tomorrow inside a freshly painted bike lane, and a driver runs a stop sign and kills her and then says to the cop, “Gee, I so totally did not mean to do that,” that will most likely be good enough.

    “We do not know of a single case of a cyclist fatality in which the driver was prosecuted, except for D.U.I. or hit-and-run,” Leah Shahum, the executive director of the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, told me.

    I came across this article which is eerily similar to the Bob Lennon case:

    Why Do Motorists Hit Cyclists & Run? Because 30 days is better than 4-8 YEARS!~

    #554360
    Darien D.
    Darien D.
    Participant

    I’m sorry, but I’m stopping. I don’t care what the consequences are. If you hit someone (which seems to be happening an AWFUL lot lately) how in the world could you just keep right on driving? Forget laws, forget reasons, forget punishments, forget sentences, forget which action you take will determine how much time you get behind bars… this is a human life we’re talking about here. It’s quite possible many of the people who died may have survived if the driver had stopped. Instead they’re left for dead because the driver is only concerned with their own butt.

    Very interesting article. I was hit by a car when I was about 10 or 11. I was on my bike with a friend of mine on the handlebars (mistake #1) and I left the sidewalk without looking (mistake #2) and went right out into the street and into traffic. A blue van hit us, knocking us back up onto the sidewalk. I remember looking up to see the van that just hit us drive off down the road. A bunch of people came running, with my mom soon following, as we were hit just outside a little store that my parents owned. My mom was screaming and passersby informed her that we’d just been hit by a blue van that drove off. However, the blue van eventually came back. No doubt he was freaked out at first. He’d just hit 2 kids on a bike. And I can understand that one would be freaked out if they hit another person. But I still couldn’t just keep driving. Heck, I stop if I hit an animal.

    I’m not sure what came of all that, I don’t remember. However, it was entirely my fault. I darted into traffic on my bike and there’s no way the guy in the van would have had time to stop. So I can say, from personal experience, that I know what it’s like to be hit by a car and I don’t think I have to mention that it’s not at all pleasant.

    I also almost hit someone in Kroger’s parking lot recently. I was driving (slowly) beside the store, ready to turn down an aisle to find somewhere to park, when this woman stepped off the curb to walk through the parking lot and didn’t even bother looking to see if any cars were coming (she was not in a crosswalk) because – surprise surprise – she had her face stuck in her phone. If I hadn’t been paying attention, I probably would have hit her.

    We don’t just have distracted drivers out there, we have distracted walkers as well and that’s why I believe that a portion of pedestrians (not cyclists) are hit by cars because they’re not paying attention to their surroundings. They’re too busy texting and talking on their phones.

    #554361

    News
    Participant

    Three Reasons Why Non-Cyclists Should Be Pro-Bike
    Posted November 22, 2013

    Let’s face it – not everyone rides a bike. According to a study from the National Household Travel Surveys, less than two percent of Americans cycle per day. That number will differ elsewhere, but the point is a small percentage of our human population is on a bicycle. Still, large measures are being taken to boost cycling across the globe.

    With that being said, why should the people who opt for other modes of transportation support the bicycle advocacy movement? After all, our tax dollars can go to many uses. The fact is that there are so many benefits that come from making the world bike-friendly.

    Here are three reasons why non-cyclists should support the cause:

    READ MORE: http://sustainablecitiescollective.com/global-site-plans-grid/200611/three-reasons-why-non-cyclists-should-be-pro-bike

    #554362

    ScottUlrich
    Participant

    I just saw a similar article the other day:

    WHY PEOPLE WHO DON’T BIKE SHOULD SUPPORT BICYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE
    The question bicycling advocates face isn’t always, “How do we convince people to ride?” To many, the more relevant question is, “How do we convince people who don’t ever plan to ride bikes that they should support public investment in bicycling infrastructure?” Here are five points we can use.

    READ MORE: http://www.peopleforbikes.org/blog/entry/why-people-who-dont-bike-should-support-bicycling-infrastructure

    #1010199

    CyclingExplorer
    Participant

    For those interested, I have a section on my Youtube channel devoted to many of the trails in central Ohio. Check it out: https://www.youtube.com/user/CyclingExplorerTV

    #1010218

    foxforcefive
    Participant

    Not sure if this goes here, but I’m looking at getting a new bike. I stopped at :Roll the other day, and just about fell in love with the Giant Anyroad 1. Anyone on here have this bike, and what are your thoughts about it? The guy at the shop said they have sold 4 of them this week, but not sure if that’s sales junk or what.

    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/bikes/model/anyroad.1/14819/66151/

    And the link at :Roll: http://roll-online.com/product/14giant-anyroad-2-193862-1.htm

    I’d be using it for some fitness trail riding, and some commuting. Thoughts?

    #1011124

    Twixlen
    Participant

    I know nothing about that bike, but it’s a gorgeous looking thing! I had a similar desire with my bike – commuting, mostly paved riding, with the possibility of packed dirt trail riding/off pavement riding, and got a Kona Dew DL, which I am crazy about.

    I ended up getting my bike at Paradise Garage – maybe the answer is to go to more than one kind of shop, and check out all the possible options (especially since you seem to have a very nice budget). When I was a Paradise, I was able to take the bike out & zoom around the block a few times – and did this on several bikes – to see how they felt. Once I’d narrowed it down to The Bike, we went for a spin of a couple miles, to make sure I liked the way it handled. I have zero regrets about it. :)

    #1015804
    jgeorge300
    jgeorge300
    Participant
    #1015820

    substance
    Participant

    Idaho stop makes a lot of sense

    #1015891

    DTown
    Participant

    Nope, I don’t think I buy it. Disregarding laws because it’s easier on the legs of cyclists doesn’t make any more sense than cars disregarding laws because it’s more fuel efficient. Plus, most of their arguments could reasonably be applied to cars too. If a bike can stop at a light, look both ways, and continue on, surely a car could too, right? A car is just as capable as slowing down to 3-4 mph and cruising slowly through a stop sign. Why not?

    Arguing that it’s actually safer because cyclists will choose different, less safe routes if they have to stop is as ridiculous as saying crosswalks make pedestrians unsafe because people will cross highways in order to avoid waiting for a walk signal.

    These things make sense only when there are relatively few cars on large expanses of road. Somewhere, say, like Idaho. Sort of why you don’t see walk/don’t walk signals on rural farm roads, just look both ways and cross when it’s clear. In town, in suburbia, on a campus, not so much.

    Seems to me the safest roads are where everyone on them are behaving predictably, in the same manner, and following all the rules. Drivers aren’t going to be better at sharing and recognition if they have to go through a checklist game called “will it stop?” at every intersection. Is it going to take you a few minutes longer? Maybe. But, it’ll definitely be safer for everyone using the road.

    #1015958

    CyclingExplorer
    Participant

    Cycling Alum Creek Trail – 2014 Construction – Columbus Ohio


    #1016222

    CyclingExplorer
    Participant

    If you have a bike near Sharon Woods, this is a great trail!

    #1016223

    CyclingExplorer
    Participant

    Also, The Suspension Bridge betweeb Wolfe Park and Academy Park is open. Here is what it looks like now….

    #1016334

    CyclingExplorer
    Participant

    Alum Creek Trail to Scioto Trail connector. Update including construction around and under I-71

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 89 total)

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