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Airport-Downtown Rail Line Proposed

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Airport-Downtown Rail Line Proposed

Viewing 15 posts - 166 through 180 (of 192 total)
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  • #559533

    Saint Murrays
    Participant

    The Mayor needs to get Les Wexner on board by including a linkage to Easton. Some sort of private/public funding option. Less parking spaces there means more land to develop $$$

    #559534

    substance
    Participant

    This map shows the rail lines in Columbus fairly well:
    http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=14/39.9792/-82.9520&layers=T

    #559535

    RedStorm
    Participant

    Thanks for the maps. The problem with simply saying, “Let’s build off of these existing rail lines” is that the freight being transported on those lines would likely have to be diverted using alternate routes. And many do not have ideal locations for stops. So I’m not sure if the plan they are looking into is to simply convert some of those freight lines in certain areas, or to lay new passneger tracks parallel with the existing tracks.

    But if you’re talking just existing lines – nearly every suburb except Dublin and then Gahanna/New Albany are pretty near a line that goes into downtown. You’d probably also like to add a north/south route perhaps along Indianola or 4th street maybe. The current lines west of the Olentangy and along 71 are probably too far apart to be useful for campus, short north, harrison west, Clintonville, etc.

    #559536

    ehill27
    Participant

    ^ It’s possible to share the lines, and I believe it’s done elsewhere, including with Amtrak. I also believe that COTA’s 2000 light rail proposal would have used existing lines. I assume that means they had tentative lease agreements with the line owners.

    #900643

    michaelcoyote
    Participant

    Existing rails and ROW can be leveraged to lower the overall cost of the system but shouldn’t be the only factor. In the end you still want the system to serve as many as feasible. If you need to branch off of existing ROW to make a usable line, then do it if the cost is reasonable and the routing makes sense..

    #942686

    ranchdude
    Participant

    A lot of good points made here. Somebody mentioned an increase in traffic in regards to the airport itself. What no one has really touched on here (and maybe they’re being polite not to) is generational. That increased traffic includes 2 generations of folks that actually want more public transit. You just can’t get an old baby boomer (not already used to transit) to get out of their SUVs. It was pounded into their heads for 25 years that driving a car = freedom/’Murica/Hot Dogs/Apple Pie/Chevrolet. General Motors along w/ the other car co’s, rubber and petroleum companies killed the established rail system that served ALL CITIES. Maybe not villages. BUT ALL cities at one point DID have rail transit. It might have been dangerous, noisy and dirty, but it served the people, kept less cars polluting the air (more total pollution with 1 person/car) that we ALL breathe, and didn’t make building roads a perpetual/perennial gravy train for construction companies connected well to State Governments. Let’s pay these companies to fix our infrastructure and build for the FUTURE. Everything old is new again.

    So Millenias, just deal with it for another 20 years and 2 more mass expansions of I-270 on the North side. Hell the last 2 times they expanded it, there was traffic relief for a good 10 minutes. On a positive note, I can provide hard anecdotal evidence that the Millenias are smart enough to drink & drive less than my Gen X and far far less than generations prior to that. Mission accomplished M.A.D.D. You can take the downtown train home now. We need that money to build a future.

    #1001173

    News
    Participant

    Airport Task Force to Take a Broad Look at Rail Options
    March 31, 2014 8:00 am – Brent Warren
    Conceptual composite image by Walker Evans

    Although its first meeting has yet to be scheduled, an outline of what the new airport task force will be tasked with is beginning to take shape.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/airport-task-force-to-take-a-broad-look-at-rail-options-bw1

    #1001195

    Achekov
    Participant

    What no one has really touched on here (and maybe they’re being polite not to) is generational. That increased traffic includes 2 generations of folks that actually want more public transit. You just can’t get an old baby boomer (not already used to transit) to get out of their SUVs.

    I don’t think this is primarily aimed at old baby boomers with SUVs, since most of those folks live out in the sticks. It’s aimed at younger urban professionals who live in the city. 2 out of 3 generations should be plenty of people to get the ball rolling.

    OTOH, it may attract some boomers out in the sticks who want to ride into town occasionally, and it might also make downtown housing more attractive to some retirees. As people retire they tend to want to drive less. They can either move to a place where they get around in a golf cart, or a place with a nice transit system.

    #1001297

    Scioto Tower
    Participant

    Why does the gov’t always have to “dive right in” when looking at ideas like this?? I consider myself a “railfan” and I know that the tracks that run from downtown to the airport are the least busy in town. A large chunk of that line, if not all of it, has two tracks, which makes passing other trains quite easy. They would obviously have to negotiate with the track owners, but I am sure they could get something done. Set up a temporary station near the convention center. Set up a temporary station at the airport (the tracks are a bit far from the terminal, so a siding track specifically for the commuter line would have to be installed on airport property). They could lease the train equipment (either from other cities, or Amtrak or some other leasing company). Test it out for a year and see how much ridership it gets. From there, if it makes sense, now invest in permanent equipment and stations. Amtrak shares freight lines all over the US and the NE corridor on which Amtrak runs a ton of trains also shares tracks with freights. For a simple end point to end point line like this, sharing is easily doable. Now, if things started to expand from there, you probably have to install additional trackage, but sharing even then is not out of the question. Freight railroads hate doing it, but there should be a way to get it done.

    #1001319
    Posole
    Posole
    Participant

    Why does the gov’t always have to “dive right in” when looking at ideas like this?? …

    Serious? They have been “diving right in” to transit for the last 30 years around here. If you want them to take their time, then you’ve already got that wish.

    #1001347

    Scioto Tower
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Scioto Tower wrote:</div>
    Why does the gov’t always have to “dive right in” when looking at ideas like this?? …

    Serious? They have been “diving right in” to transit for the last 30 years around here. If you want them to take their time, then you’ve already got that wish.

    I meant on the money side of things…they like to spend billions where billions are not needed…at least not yet. Unfortunately, I don’t have any ideas on how to cure their speediness on anything, let alone something like this.

    #1001557
    Caleb
    Caleb
    Participant

    I meant on the money side of things…they like to spend billions where billions are not needed…at least not yet. Unfortunately, I don’t have any ideas on how to cure their speediness on anything, let alone something like this.

    So highway funding? One project (Crossroads) has, I believe, been estimated to cost around $1.5 billion.

    #1001578
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    So highway funding?

    Yes, because highways aren’t needed at all.

    That’s why there aren’t any highways in NYC; they have trains.

    Oh, wait…

    #1002121

    News
    Participant

    For immediate release
    Tuesday, April 1, 2014
    Mayor Coleman Appoints JET Task Force

    Mayor Michael B. Coleman today announced a diverse 14-member task force to maximize one of our community’s strongest assets, Port Columbus. Mayor Coleman is charging the Jobs, Expansion & Transportation Task Force with developing an actionable plan for increasing direct flights, expanding economic development and examining the feasibility of making Port Columbus a regional transportation center. The JET Task Force will hold its first meeting in April, adopt a work schedule and issue a report of its findings and recommendations in the fall of 2014. Once the report is complete, Mayor Coleman is committed to helping to identify resources to put the task force’s plan into action.

    “It is time to begin thinking of our airport as more than a place we catch a plane,” Mayor Coleman said. “I believe it is time to redefine our airport as an economic hub and the center of transportation for the region. I thank these outstanding individuals for giving their time and talents to explore the possibilities for the future.”

    Direct flights are instrumental to Columbus’ ability to recruit and expand businesses. Each day 142 direct flights carry passengers from Port Columbus to 31 destinations. Although two daily direct flights were added to Los Angeles last year, LA, Las Vegas and Phoenix remain Columbus’ only direct flights to the western United States.

    “I am excited to join with this talented group of public and private stakeholders and answer Mayor Coleman’s call for action on these important issues,” said Daniel Rosenthal, president of Milestone Aviation Group, who will serve as chair of the task force. “Our city is growing, and we need our airport district and domestic and international flight service to reflect and further support this growth.”

    Port Columbus is a major jobs center that generates more than 33,000 jobs with more than $1.1 billion in payroll. Studies say 24,000 additional jobs can be created in the region around the airport. Port Columbus is geographically positioned to be a transportation center for rail service, bus service and more efficient car service.

    In addition to Rosenthal, serving on the JET Task Force are:

    Ted Adams, vice president and senior counsel, L Brands
    Elizabeth Blount, vice president and owner, Uniglobe Travel Designers
    Kacey Brankamp, member, Create Columbus Commission
    Jean Carter-Ryan, president, Columbus-Franklin County Finance Authority
    Geoffrey Chatas, chief financial officer and senior vice president, Ohio State University
    Michael Dalby, president, Greater Columbus Chamber of Commerce
    Michael Johnson, president, East Columbus Civic Association
    Stephen Lyons, executive vice president, Columbus Partnership
    Jolene Molitoris, former director, Ohio Department of Transportation
    William Murdock, executive director, Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission
    Mark Patton, senior managing director, Jobs Ohio
    Anthony Precourt, chairman and investor-operator, Columbus Crew
    Jonathan Ramsden, chief financial officer and executive vice president, Abercrombie & Fitch
    _ _ _

    #1004856
    Caleb
    Caleb
    Participant

    Yes, because highways aren’t needed at all.

    That’s why there aren’t any highways in NYC; they have trains.

    Oh, wait…

    Yes, because trains aren’t needed at all.

    They carry most of the transportation goods across the nation. Yes, highways serve a purpose (for the recorded I never said they weren’t needed), but so do trains. Highways are used for both commercial and noncommercial purposes, while trains are mainly used for commercial purpose. Most of the time, the infrastructure is there, it just needed to be renovated to meet both commercial and noncommercial purposes. Why waist a viable option to both increase economic benefit (by potentially reducing congestion) and improving the “lure” and attraction of the city to Millennials who want transit options. And luring them, in effect, provides more economic benefit.

Viewing 15 posts - 166 through 180 (of 192 total)

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