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Arts and Economic Development in Columbus

Home Forums Events Art Events Arts and Economic Development in Columbus

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 77 total)
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  • #459173

    JonMyers
    Participant

    @Coreroc & Andrew –

    Yeah, AH that is exactly what I’m getting at.

    Core, the leadership in Columbus has been parroting those same lines for years now. The advancements in the arts you mentioned happened independent of that leadership. Mainly you all just executing.

    And… maybe I’m wrong. We’re you inspired by the words and blessings of the leadership to go out and do these things? Knowing the artists I know here in town who are actually doing something I doubt it. You’re probably too busy getting shit done.

    #459174

    Brant
    Participant

    Chris Sherman said:
    timing is perfect for what we are trying to achieve in the kld and franklinton. im going to guess its a good thing to have the chairman of the NEA, les wexner, the mayor and the cols foundation having these discussions. to me it felt like an audition. im glad franklinton and the kld had a moment to shine in the conversation.

    Cool, I’m glad you found it worthwhile. Like Walker said, YMMV with this sort of thing.

    #459175
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Brant said:
    I guess 2003 or so, soon after Florida’s book came out and there was still a lot of buzz about it. This event kinda seemed like a “Creative Class Reunion Tour 2011.”

    Heh. So the whole creative class thing was something that was only to be mentioned in 2003 as a new idea, and then quickly brushed aside… never to be mentioned again? ;)

    #459176
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    JonMyers said:
    Core, the leadership in Columbus has been parroting those same lines for years now. The advancements in the arts you mentioned happened independent of that leadership. Mainly you all just executing.

    And… maybe I’m wrong. We’re you inspired by the words and blessings of the leadership to go out and do these things? Knowing the artists I know here in town who are actually doing something I doubt it. You’re probably too busy getting shit done.

    I guess I’m missing what the alternative to this event would have been. That it didn’t happen? So that we have a lack of acknowledgement to the value of the work of local artists and creatives? Should our top-down leadership efforts either ignore or discount these people? Or just go away because we don’t need “the man” meddling in things?

    It sounds like a lot of effort is going into saying that not enough good came out of this event, which I agree with to some extents… but it certainly was far from being a bad thing.

    I mean… sure, let’s always push for more, and always expect more… but it never hurts to start from a positive working point when moving forward, right?

    #459177

    Brant
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Heh. So the whole creative class thing was something that was only to be mentioned in 2003 as a new idea, and then quickly brushed aside… never to be mentioned again? ;)

    Yes, that’s exactly what I meant ;)

    #459178

    I had a somewhat different take on Monday’s panel discussion…

    Rocco Landesman, head of the National Endowment for the Arts, noted last Monday that he “hardly gives a speech nowadays that doesn’t mention Columbus’ Short North” What he failed to mention is that the city’s artists can no longer afford to live in the neighborhood they inspired. Monday’s panel discussion between Landesman, Les Wexner, Mayor Coleman, and Douglas Kridler of the Columbus Foundation was long on rhetoric and short on specifics. Sounding much like politicians wielding a budget axe, the panel said to the assembled artists and arts administrators that they need to continue doing more with less.

    Mr. Landesman was spot on when he reported on research showing that companies will relocate to where the talent they need wants to live. And talented workers want an environment rich in culture and art. The mayor noted that New Orleans, with a population one-quarter the size of Columbus, supports 280 art galleries. He called for more galleries to be opened around the city, but failed to explain how the necessary art patron base could be expanded. Mr. Wexner also noted that Columbus needs more people willing to support the arts, and seemed to imply that the city’s artists should figure out how to grow such a population.

    It was only in response to the final question of the session that Mr. Landesman hit the real issue confronting the arts in Columbus. Nearly two generations ago, Ohio schools began to give up arts programming as a cost saving measure. The consequence is that while most Ohioans can spout a wide variety of sports statistics, they are illiterate when it comes to artists, artistic styles, and the richness and satisfaction which comes from patronizing the arts.

    Thus, I offer a final question to each of the panelists; what will you do to put the arts and art appreciation back into our public schools – at all grade levels? The city’s artists will do their part, but what is needed is financial investment and political will.

    #459180

    Andrew Hall
    Member

    Tom B said:
    The consequence is that while most Ohioans can spout a wide variety of sports statistics, they are illiterate when it comes to artists, artistic styles, and the richness and satisfaction which comes from patronizing the arts.

    This type of contempt for everybody else (aka customers/clients) is one of the largest impediments to the arts being a useful part of economic development.

    A.

    #459181
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    Tom B said:

    It was only in response to the final question of the session that Mr. Landesman hit the real issue confronting the arts in Columbus. Nearly two generations ago, Ohio schools began to give up arts programming as a cost saving measure. The consequence is that while most Ohioans can spout a wide variety of sports statistics, they are illiterate when it comes to artists, artistic styles, and the richness and satisfaction which comes from patronizing the arts.

    Thus, I offer a final question to each of the panelists; what will you do to put the arts and art appreciation back into our public schools – at all grade levels? The city’s artists will do their part, but what is needed is financial investment and political will.

    I feel it is not fair to put the blame on schools. Of course they can always do more, but when they also have funding problems, art it is one of the things on the chopping block. Parents need to step in and fill the void. We had a discussion here years ago about students graduating high school and not knowing how to balance a checkbook. Sure it is easy to blame schools for that, but really they should be finding out that info at home.

    In my opinion, if you have children, it is part of your responsibility as a parent to help them get a rounded education. Help them with finances, help them discover art, have them play a musical instrument or go to a classical concert, get them involved with sports. Even if your kid doesn’t love it, expose them to it.
    Examples –
    The Columbus Museum of Art just revamped with a wonderful kids area. They also offer programs at little cost for you to help your child learn about art: http://www.columbusmuseum.org/learn-about-art/for-families/index.php
    ProMusica offers $5 student tickets to regular performances with a student id. http://www.promusicacolumbus.org/schedule/specials.php
    Columbus ArtMobile is offering solutions to the lack of arts in schools problem and Heather should be supported financially and embraced. http://columbusartmobile.weebly.com/
    Columbus Parks & Rec offers free to little cost programs of all topics, but also art for young kids. http://parks.columbus.gov/homepage.aspx
    Jazz Arts Group has an extensive amount of work they do for the community and schools. http://www.jazzartsgroup.org/jazz-academy/
    SEEK Camps help supplement sciences. http://www.techlifeohio.com/blogs/seek-largest-engineering-focused-camp-middle-school-students-nation
    The Wexner Center has offerings as well, notably their ZOOM Family Film Festival
    http://www.wexarts.org/learn/

    There are many many more programs available. Just go to art galleries! Even just having your child receive Highlights Magazine is a plus.

    I agree that having school funding be cut and art programs and such being cut stinks. But I think it is the responsibility of parents to make sure to expose their children to things they are not getting in school and it is the responsibility of the community to make sure they are helping fund these programs or volunteer their help to sustain and grow them.

    #459182
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Full video is now online:

    #459183

    Brant
    Participant

    Nice. Thanks for posting :)

    #459184
    Jeff Regensburger
    Jeff Regensburger
    Participant

    I haven’t chimed in about this yet, mostly because I’m still not entirely sure what it was for. Was it supposed to provide direction? If so, I’m not sure it did. Was it supposed to be a pep rally? If so, it was kind of a downer. Were those of us in the audience there to support the panel, or was the panel there to support us? I still don’t know.

    Ultimately I’m sympathetic to the message, but the title (A Way Forward) implied a little more direction than the event offered.

    #459185

    Coreroc
    Member

    JonMyers said:

    @Coreroc
    & Andrew –

    Yeah, AH that is exactly what I’m getting at.

    Core, the leadership in Columbus has been parroting those same lines for years now. The advancements in the arts you mentioned happened independent of that leadership. Mainly you all just executing.

    And… maybe I’m wrong. We’re you inspired by the words and blessings of the leadership to go out and do these things? Knowing the artists I know here in town who are actually doing something I doubt it. You’re probably too busy getting shit done.

    Good points and your on par for my motivation being driven by more ground level forces. When the drive to create and make things happen both for myself and others took full momentum is was around the time of the Indie Arts Capital agenda. At that time we all spoke about being leaders in a way, but some of those folks have gone full throttle like Adam Brouillette and Matt Slaybaugh in their own ways. I think it takes support and success on all of those levels to make a lasting impact on the overall community.

    I try to focus the most on the audience aspect of the Arts. Without driving new folks to the events it’s hard to generate that monetary support system no matter if it’s directly impacting artists with sales or getting the kind of folks that support future projects with funding. Art is a business that damn sure doesn’t come with a silver platter so as a motivated businessman I make sure I’m not waiting for that golden egg to fall out of the sky.

    #459186

    TemporaryCoolBeans
    Participant

    Ohio Art League is having a post A Way Forward discussion at Brothers Drake Meadery this coming Wednesday from 6-8pm. With the city’s bicentennial approaching, ”Our Creative City: Preparing for Columbus’ Bicentennial” is an outlet designed for a back and forth discussion between city residents, professionals, and art enthusiasts…this is an open venue for discussion such as this. Your participation is requested!

    Please register on the second link above.

    Free: food, non-alcoholic drinks. In addition, a mixer will be held after the event closer to the bar.

    #459187
    Jeff Regensburger
    Jeff Regensburger
    Participant

    Can the Arts Save Struggling Cities?

    Something is stirring in Detroit. Here, in a city that in the past decade alone lost a quarter of its already dwindling population, plans are in the works to revive the manufacturing economy — at least on a small scale. The Detroit FAB Lab taps into the vibe of “maker” labs and hackerspaces around the globe. Its creators envision an incubator for artists, artisans, and entrepreneurs. Members will have access to equipment for woodworking, metalworking, digital fabrication, and media, as well as business coaching and networking.

    It’s a pretty even-handed look at the role of the arts in economic development.

    #459189

    Andrew Hall
    Member

    jeff_r said:
    Can the Arts Save Struggling Cities?
    It’s a pretty even-handed look at the role of the arts in economic development.

    Good article. Thanks for posting it.

    I have visited Detroit a few times recently and likely will some more. Not to diminish the huge problems they do have, but there is definitely a can-do vibe that is taking hold.

    I do think that too much of the focus on arts funding is wrongly placed as it treats “The Arts” as a thing in itself rather than value-added (allowing for the the added value often being greater than the initial.)

    A.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 77 total)

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