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Arts and Economic Development in Columbus

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 77 total)
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  • #459156

    JonMyers
    Participant

    Walker said:
    So discussions are only worth having if there’s some big announcement or cosmic shift planned as a result?

    Don’t you think that sometimes the concept of repeating things that are important can be valuable too? Maybe not to you personally, but to other people who are listening and engaging?

    Do people really need to be reminded that there are no oceans and mountains in Columbus? Again? lol – ok.

    I don’t think there has to be a grand announcement. There has to be a framework for participation and action beyond the discussion. Next steps.

    There was a big discussion. There have been way too many of these discussions
    – now what.

    #459157
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Do the next steps need to be spelled out by the panelists or is that up to the people in charge of our arts organizations and our arts supporters and patrons?

    I’ve been kicking around an idea for an arts/development project for awhile now. Yesterday’s event was the sort of reminder I needed to consider moving forward with making it a reality.

    That’s just my own personal takeaway. YMMV.

    #459159

    News
    Participant

    NEA head stops for pep rally
    By Jeffrey Sheban
    The Columbus Dispatch
    Tuesday September 20, 2011 6:10 AM

    Columbus provides a model for other communities seeking to marshal the arts for economic development, the chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts said yesterday.

    ‘There’s hardly a speech I give nowadays that doesn’t mention the Short North,’ said Rocco Landesman, who, during a swing through Ohio, took part in a panel discussion in Mershon Auditorium at the Wexner Center for the Arts.

    READ MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/life_and_entertainment/2011/09/20/nea-head-stops-for-pep-rally.html

    #459160

    HeySquare
    Participant

    So walker questioned: “To that end, my big question would be… if the Short North came about organically and largely without institutional or government funding, how will an intentional replication with influence from institutions and government change the outcome of Franklinton or the KLD.”

    I don’t agree with the comment that the Short North evolved “organically.” It’s more that the Short North has had a confluence of factors, which when combined, provide a framework for revitalization. The same factors contributed to the revitalization of German Village, although not necessarily in the same proportions or with the same vision. These factors include:
    1. Existing, unique buildings or structures
    2. Committed local residents, who invest in the neighborhood
    3. Committed commercial/entreprenurial developers, who invest for long term returns
    4. Destination businesses– businesses that help to establish the identity of the neighborhood and/or that establish or hold a following. I think of Rigsbys in that regard for the Short North, or Schmidts in GV
    5. Government support through effective policing, historic district designation, enforcement (or in some cases non-enforcement) of zoning codes, investment and maintenance of public right-of-way, creation or maintenance of public recreation spaces (parks, etc.)
    6. Organizing vision- I don’t mean some catch-phrase that a planner thinks up, but usually there is some shared vision that the committed groups buy into.

    Off the top of my head, those are the factors that seem critical components of successful revitalization. Major public works can serve as a blessing– a beautiful bridge or an outstanding public building provide tremendous return in terms of “place-making” i.e. providing the infrastructure that defines a geographic location. And as noted, Columbus is a bit of a blank slate in that regard, since we don’t have mountains or oceans as constraints and amenities. But just throwing money at a place typically fails.

    And I can’t agree with jpizzow– while I know the Columbus Commons is fairly un-designed, I think that is part of what may make it a very useful space. It can be used for a lot of different purposes, and it is not so precious that people won’t feel comfortable really using the space intensely. If it becomes too precious, it won’t be utilized, and I think utilization of the space will be key to its success.

    #459161

    Brant
    Participant

    Walker, thanks for the detailed recap of the event. It sounds like “pep rally” was a pretty apt description. Like Jon, I’m puzzled by the timing of the event (9 years after Rise of the Creative Class was published) and the lack of any coordinated framework to take those important next steps as a community.

    Maybe Mr. Landesman’s visit also had something to do with the GCAC’s Our Town grant from the NEA.

    At any rate, I’m glad that people seemed energized by the event. Your art/development idea sounds promising and I look forward to seeing what you have in store for us :)

    #459162
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    HeySquare said:

    And I can’t agree with jpizzow– while I know the Columbus Commons is fairly un-designed, I think that is part of what may make it a very useful space. It can be used for a lot of different purposes, and it is not so precious that people won’t feel comfortable really using the space intensely. If it becomes too precious, it won’t be utilized, and I think utilization of the space will be key to its success.

    Yes,I agree. Ongoing utilization of the park is key with concerts, kickboxing, or whatever. That is just one purpose the park SHOULD fulfill. But, it’s not the only purpose. That lawn is plenty big enough to handle the type of events targeted without much need for more space. My focus, I guess, was more towards the grassy areas abutting High Street. I believe it would be benefiical to have large art installations (some interactive) to pull people off of the street for some random encounter, sort of what like Millennium Park does for Chicago, just on a smaller scale. You cannot help but to be pulled off of Michigan Avenue to explore the park. What you see from High St. is basically grass and, to be fair, if you have a child, a carousel, but that’s about it. And, unless you have shorts on under your suit, then you won’t be kickboxing either. haha, anyways. It’s the random encounters that make urban areas unique and I just don’t see too much visually appealing about the Commons in order for residents, visitors or office workers to become more emotionally attached to it. I don’t like the notion that this park, in some ways, is treated as a “temporary” central park. It should be THE central park for downtown and given the amenities capable of leaving a lasting impression.

    Like the mayor, Gee and others have said, we need to make our built environment the best it can be in order to make up for our geographical handicaps.

    #459163

    BCNation
    Participant

    For those of you who weren’t able to make it, WOSU Channel 34 is airing this on Sunday @ 1PM.

    #459164

    JonMyers
    Participant

    Brant said:
    Walker, thanks for the detailed recap of the event. It sounds like “pep rally” was a pretty apt description. Like Jon, I’m puzzled by the timing of the event (9 years after Rise of the Creative Class was published) and the lack of any coordinated framework to take those important next steps as a community.

    Yep, puzzled is right. I don’t get the reminder part:

    Bob Barker reminding you: help control the pet population. Have your pet spayed or neutered. Goodbye, everybody!

    So, it was a PSA for the arts and Wexner is Bob Barker? Seems like the equivalent.

    #459165
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    HeySquare said:
    I don’t agree with the comment that the Short North evolved “organically.” It’s more that the Short North has had a confluence of factors, which when combined, provide a framework for revitalization. The same factors contributed to the revitalization of German Village, although not necessarily in the same proportions or with the same vision. These factors include:

    “a confluence of factors, which when combined, provide a framework for revitalization”

    That sounds like the exact definition of “organic growth”. ;)

    My point is that there was no “Short North Master Plan” that was handed down from City Hall or a single private developer in 1979 that dictated how the neighborhood would look today.

    The opposite would be the Arena District, which did put together a Master Plan that explained every detail of what we have today.

    http://msidesign.com/index.php/arena-district-mp/

    #459166
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Brant said:
    Maybe Mr. Landesman’s visit also had something to do with the GCAC’s Our Town grant from the NEA.

    Probably. It was mentioned at the event.

    Is there (or was there) a better time/date for this event that would have made more sense?

    #459167

    Coreroc
    Member

    JonMyers said:
    It sounds like a word for word rehash of the discussions I’ve heard about Columbus arts and economic development for the last 6 years.

    Whats’ the outcome? Everyone is more enlightened…

    In the last 6 years groups like FAD, Couchfire Collective, Crafty Catillion, Cowtown Lowbrow, Cap City Creatives, Creative Arts of Women, Mother Artists at Work, Gallery 83, and Wild Goose Creative have grown into forces in the community. Those groups have spawned everything from new real estate investemnts to festivals like Independents Day. Art events like Agora, c note, Por Vida, Urban Scrawl, Art al Fresco, and Haloween Highball have come to be great events the city supports and follows. We created a new moniker for the city “the independent arts capitiol of the world” no matter how much it isn’t said these days. I think the last 6 years in Columbus has proven to be a great time and place for the arts and artists alike to step away from seed money and prove that no matter what our city has culture and is a place that welcomes and embraces creative energy. I think that speaks volumes about the potential here with more money in the pot. I’m satisfied with that outcome more than the alternitive of everyone buys art at target and/or odd lots.

    #459168

    Andrew Hall
    Member

    @Coreroc

    I don’t think Jon or I are saying that Columbus lacks for a vibrant art scene. What I think is that almost none of the positives you mention are a result of top-down ‘support the arts’ mentality represented by the NEA and others.

    What I would like to see is the next stage where we move from an event or ‘special’ mentality of separation with art and into more of a value-added aspect where those energies, creativity and processes enhance all the other facets of the economy. That is the key to economic development with respect to the arts.

    And I think that vision exactly meshes with your last line.

    A.

    #459170

    myliftkk
    Participant

    I guess I find it ironic that no one on the panel actually built anything in the Short North, but they all think they understand its’ lesson and how it can be applied elsewhere. That’s not a knock on their expertise or value of their various organizations, substantial it is. If you really want to understand how the arts fit into an economic story like the Short North, you might start with an actual panel of long-time proprietors. You’ll get a lot more value and a lot more candor about how the interaction between arts, economics, and government really works in practice.

    #459171

    Brant
    Participant

    Walker said:
    My point is that there was no “Short North Master Plan” that was handed down from City Hall or a single private developer….

    True, but Sandy Wood would come pretty close.

    Walker said:
    Is there (or was there) a better time/date for this event that would have made more sense?

    I guess 2003 or so, soon after Florida’s book came out and there was still a lot of buzz about it. This event kinda seemed like a “Creative Class Reunion Tour 2011.”

    #459172
    Chris Sherman
    Chris Sherman
    Participant

    Brant said:
    True, but Sandy Wood would come pretty close.

    I guess 2003 or so, soon after Florida’s book came out and there was still a lot of buzz about it. This event kinda seemed like a “Creative Class Reunion Tour 2011.”

    timing is perfect for what we are trying to achieve in the kld and franklinton. im going to guess its a good thing to have the chairman of the NEA, les wexner, the mayor and the cols foundation having these discussions. to me it felt like an audition. im glad franklinton and the kld had a moment to shine in the conversation.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 77 total)

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