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3C Passenger Rail Project - News & Updates

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation 3C Passenger Rail Project – News & Updates

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Viewing 15 posts - 166 through 180 (of 1,160 total)
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  • #347482
    hugh59
    hugh59
    Participant

    I want to see more rail transportation. I want to be able to catch a train in Columbus and be able to travel on rail throughout the country.

    But, if the plan is poorly designed and/or poorly implemented, the project will have a greater chance of failing. If this project fails, it will probably end any chance of passenger rail service for Columbus in my lifetime.

    It seems foolish that the rails are owned by private companies and have to pay taxes to the various jurisdictions they run through. Meanwhile, our nation’s highways are (for the most part) publicly owned. Some of them charge fees for their use; many are entirely supported by taxpayer dollars. This gives highway usage an unrealistic advantage.

    It is just too bad that we can’t use the same model for rail travel: have the government own the rails and charge private companies to use them.

    #347483

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    hugh59 wrote >> Meanwhile, our nation’s highways are (for the most part) publicly owned. Some of them charge fees for their use; many are entirely supported by taxpayer dollars. This gives highway usage an unrealistic advantage.
    It is just too bad that we can’t use the same model for rail travel: have the government own the rails and charge private companies to use them.

    if you think they’re screaming “socialism!” now you ain’t seen nothing like what would happen if they tried to nationalize the railroads. Hell they (certain republicans) scream about the current (paltry) subsidies enough you’d think they were murdering puppies instead of subsidizing rail.

    meanwhile almost every other country in the friggin’ world is PWNING us building workable and VERY POPULAR rail infrastructures.

    pathetic

    #347484

    bman
    Participant

    I agree with many who are saying the world is passing us by, seriously the teabaggers would love nothing less than to see a return to 1950’s.

    #347485
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    bman wrote >>
    I agree with many who are saying the world is passing us by, seriously the teabaggers would love nothing less than to see a return to 1950’s.

    Wasn’t there rail service in ohio in the 50’s?

    #347486

    Parker
    Participant

    rus wrote >>

    bman wrote >>
    I agree with many who are saying the world is passing us by, seriously the teabaggers would love nothing less than to see a return to 1950’s.

    Wasn’t there rail service in ohio in the 50’s?

    you bet. My grandpa use to travel for Kroger all over Ohio and the Midwest as well as to DC and NYC by rail. Those teabaggers and their short term memories… they always want to return to days that never were.

    #347487

    agtw31
    Member

    hugh59 wrote >>
    I want to see more rail transportation. I want to be able to catch a train in Columbus and be able to travel on rail throughout the country.

    you can start in Canton.

    my g/f rode the train all the way to Vagas a few years back.

    she enjoyed it,once she got past Chicago.

    #347488

    gramarye
    Participant

    agtw31 wrote >>

    hugh59 wrote >>
    I want to see more rail transportation. I want to be able to catch a train in Columbus and be able to travel on rail throughout the country.

    you can start in Canton.
    my g/f rode the train all the way to Vagas a few years back.
    she enjoyed it,once she got past Chicago.

    There is no rail service to Canton, other than the weekly Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad tour. When I lived in Canton (’07-’09), I had to drive out to Alliance to catch the Amtrak, and the station is unfortunately in a run-down and somewhat disquieting part of Alliance that I might not have felt comfortable hanging around in if I weren’t a single male in my mid-20s.

    #347489

    gramarye
    Participant

    hugh59 wrote >>
    I want to see more rail transportation. I want to be able to catch a train in Columbus and be able to travel on rail throughout the country.
    But, if the plan is poorly designed and/or poorly implemented, the project will have a greater chance of failing.

    I think you’re overlooking the cost component here, though, and I mean cost in terms of both money and time. The advantage of starting small and improving incrementally, particularly when the budget is already tight, is the ability to use existing rail tracks. Laying high-speed rail to start would cost approximately three times as much and would also take substantially longer due to laying new track or substantially upgrading almost all existing track. The benefits side of the ledger may be smaller, but I have a hard time believing that they’re sufficiently smaller to outweigh the advantages of one-third the cost and a faster startup time.

    #347490

    agtw31
    Member

    she just told me it was 1988 when she rode the train to Vegas.

    a few years turns into a lot when you get older,i guess.

    #347491

    Parker
    Participant

    agtw31 wrote >>

    hugh59 wrote >>
    I want to see more rail transportation. I want to be able to catch a train in Columbus and be able to travel on rail throughout the country.

    you can start in Canton.
    my g/f rode the train all the way to Vagas a few years back.
    she enjoyed it,once she got past Chicago.

    Amtrak is the only game in town and they stopped service in most minor Ohio cities like Canton and Youngstown. You now have to go to Cleveland or a few other Northern Ohio cities like Toledo or Elyria, or Cinci, to ride. I think they still have service to Alliance, which is a strange location but there must be a reason for it.

    #347492
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    From here: Will Ohio leave the station?:

    [quote]No country or state has succeeded in launching high-speed rail at the start. Experience advises beginning slow, gradually yet steadily building capacity and drawing passengers. Look at the Pacific Northwest, including rail between Seattle and Portland. The effort began in earnest in the early 1990s, at 120,000 passengers a year and 42 miles per hour. Today? The average speed is 53 miles per hour, and annual ridership has jumped to 775,000.[/quote]

    [quote]The story is the same in North Carolina, including Charlotte and Raleigh, speeds starting in the 40s, passengers climbing since 1991 from 100,000 to 390,000 annually. Ditto for places like Illinois, Maine, Missouri and New Mexico. These areas are laying the foundation for high-speed rail. They have been successful beginning with few trains and top speeds in the range of 79 miles per hour. Now Pennsylvania is moving closer to 110 miles per hour on the route between Harrisburg and Philadelphia.[/quote]

    [quote]Who would ride initially? Experienced states point to college students, seniors, households with one vehicle. Add those without cars, and you have 3.3 million people along the corridor from Cleveland to Columbus to Dayton and Cincinnati. Critics guffawed at the projected 478,000 passengers in the first year of operation (2012). The estimate wasn’t cooked up by a governor desperate for jobs. Rather, a respected engineering firm, familiar with the efforts in other states, put together the projection.[/quote]

    [quote]What’s more, the schedule can be adjusted, Amtrak providing a first draft subject to negotiation with freight lines once the state received federal money.[/quote]

    [quote]The object isn’t to be all things to all travelers at the outset. Many aspects remain in flux, reflecting, to a degree, the pace of the application (recession to stimulus to proposal), leaving much room for the questions posed by Harris and others. What states with a track record stress is the importance of a competitive price, eight cents to 12 cents per mile, slightly better than the bus (13.5 cents), much better than the car (55 cents) and air travel ($1.30).[/quote]

    #347493

    michaelcoyote
    Participant

    I rode back on the Empire Builder from Seattle with a friend in 2005. We sprung for a “roomette” which is basically a closet with the biggest picture window ever. We stocked up on booze and snacks and brought a laptop full of movies.

    Meals were included in the cost of the room and were overall great. We ended up sharing out table with all sorts of folks of all backgrounds, including one guy who was in his late 80s and just rode the trains all over the country.

    That trip was fun as shit.

    #347494

    agtw31
    Member

    i am excited about the Charlotte/Raleigh line.

    Atlanta/Charlotte/Raleigh is a humongous business/job/college corridor.

    i have no doubt this line will do extremely well.

    as for Ohio,i think there is a mass migration away from the midwest states like Michigan,Ohio,and Indiana right now,just like there was in the late 70’s/early 80’s.

    so all that will be left are college students,and the elderly.

    #347495
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    agtw31 wrote >>
    i am excited about the Charlotte/Raleigh line.

    But it’s faster to drive.

    #347496

    anillo
    Participant

    what if we compromise, and drive cars on the railroad tracks. then everybody’s happy!

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