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2015 Columbus Metro and County Population Estimates

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development 2015 Columbus Metro and County Population Estimates

This topic contains 31 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  NEOBuckeye 2 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 32 total)
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  • #1119690

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    The new population estimates are out for metros and counties, and Columbus appears to be gaining even more momentum as far as growth.

    The 2014 unrevised estimate for Franklin County was 1,231,393. The 2015 estimate has the population now at 1,251,722, an increase of 20,329. If one factored in previous-estimates revision that takes place with the new release, the county still grew 2014-2015 by 17,596, which is a slight increase over the previous year. These are some of the highest numbers the county has ever recorded in one year. The county has now grown by 88,308 since 2010, for an average annual growth of about +17,662. Cuyahoga County was estimated to be at 1,255,921 in 2015, so it is now highly likely that Franklin County is Ohio’s most populated this year.

    For the metro area, the 2015 population has grown to 2,021,632, a total growth from the original 2014 estimate of 27,096, also near the very historic peak of any single year. The metro has now added 119,658 people since 2010, for an average annual growth of about +23,932. The Columbus metro is also rapidly closing the gap on Cleveland’s, and should surpass it in the next few years.
    Cleveland’s metro fell to 2,060,810 and Cincinnati climbed to 2,157,719. While Cincinnati has a decent lead on Columbus at this point, Columbus’ metro is growing more than 3x faster now.

    All this means that the city itself is likely growing even faster than last year, when it was the nation’s 13th fastest-growing.

    #1119691

    JMan
    Participant

    Great and welcome news.Yea!

    #1119692

    WJT
    Participant

    I can find a press release about the 2015 estimates, but not the general greater info. Can you provide a link? thanks.

    Would be interesting to see the number and increase for Marion County, Indiana(indianapolis) to see if we gained on them.

    #1119776

    WJT
    Participant

    Ok here are links to County and metro stats:

    Metro: http://www.census.gov/popest/data/metro/totals/2015/index.html

    County: http://www.census.gov/popest/data/counties/totals/2015/CO-EST2015-02.html

    Interestingly, Marion County(Indianapolis, plus suburbs Speedway, Beech Grove, and Lawrence) grew by only about 4500 people. And the three smaller towns have been adding small amounts since 2010, so it is likely that only part of that 4500 is for Indianapolis itself. Depending on how much of the 17,596 in Franklin County is in Columbus, we could now be very close to Indy in population.

    2014 Indianapolis: 848,788
    2014 Columbus: 835,957

    Difference: 12,831.

    Marion County Indiana 2014-2015 + 4,489.
    Franklin County Ohio 2014-2015 + 17,596.

    If two thirds of that growth in Franklin County was in Columbus, we could be within 6,000 of Indy.

    Columbus was also the fastest growing large metro(top ten) in the Midwest 2010-2015, with a 6.3% growth rate, outpacing Minneapolis and Indianapolis which have grown at a 5.2 and 5.3% rate respectively since 2010.

    #1119802

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    http://allcolumbusdata.com/?p=5081

    This is my more extensive post on the state’s county estimates. I’ll be making something about the metros and Columbus’ peers by tomorrow.

    #1119810

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    Great work as always jbcmh, thanks for posting!

    #1119814

    ryan883
    Participant

    You are using two different figures and comparing them as if they are the same. Cleveland’s CSA is 3.5 Million and Columbus is the correct figure you stated at 2M. Greater Cleveland is still much larger than Columbus and will be for a while.

    #1119818

    bwitty92
    Participant

    He was comparing both metro area populations. What you are doing is comparing two different figures as if they are same (Cleveland’s CSA vs. Columbus’ MSA)

    #1119854

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    You are using two different figures and comparing them as if they are the same. Cleveland’s CSA is 3.5 Million and Columbus is the correct figure you stated at 2M. Greater Cleveland is still much larger than Columbus and will be for a while.

    As mentioned above, I was comparing metro areas, not CSAs. Here are the 2015 CSA totals and the change since 2010.

    Cleveland: 3,493,594 -22,052
    Columbus: 2,363,770 +55,261
    Cincinnati: 2,215,326 +41,216

    In any case, I find CSAs useless other than perhaps for media market purposes.

    #1119856

    RedStorm
    Participant

    Franklin County has outperformed Ohio as a whole since 2010? Yikes.

    #1119885
    _calebross
    _calebross
    Participant

    For what it is worth: Greater Cleveland is NOT in fact much larger than Columbus. Greater Cleveland is considered the MSA, not the CSA.

    2015 MSA Figures for Columbus, Cincinnati, & Cleveland:

    Columbus: 2,021,632 (increase)
    Cincinnati: 2,157,719 (increase)
    Cleveland: 2,060,810 (decrease)

    If anything, we will actually surpass Greater Cleveland within five years and Cincinnati probably within 15.

    #1119886

    longtimecaller
    Participant

    Apparently this is all a bit too much to take for Cincy guy who hates Columbus (in comments):

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/03/25/columbus-metro-area-surpasses-2-million-mark-in-population.html

    #1119887

    ohbr
    Participant

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/03/25/columbus-metro-area-surpasses-2-million-mark-in-population.html

    .

    lolz…. raging over city limits on a story about MSA. Wonder what he has to say about Chicago and NYC having larger city limits than our 225?

    #1119893

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    Apparently this is all a bit too much to take for Cincy guy who hates Columbus (in comments):

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/03/25/columbus-metro-area-surpasses-2-million-mark-in-population.html

    One thing that kind of annoys me is the constant reference to MORPC’s 500,000 figure in population growth by 2050. Clearly that is going to be wrong, given that the metro should add almost half of that number just by 2020, and the trends are for even stronger growth with time, not less. If they’re planning for 500K, they need to plan for it by 2030. By 2050, there will be close to double that figure added. I would think the figure being so underestimated will have long-term impacts as far as infrastructure goes.

    Another thing that annoys me is the claim that Delaware County is the fastest-growing. Sure, by % it is, but it has a MUCH lower threshold. In totals, Franklin County destroyed Delaware County in growth. Franklin County is the fastest-growing in the state by the metric that actually matters- total people moving there.

    #1119899

    WJT
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>longtimecaller wrote:</div>
    Apparently this is all a bit too much to take for Cincy guy who hates Columbus (in comments):

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/03/25/columbus-metro-area-surpasses-2-million-mark-in-population.html

    One thing that kind of annoys me is the constant reference to MORPC’s 500,000 figure in population growth by 2050. Clearly that is going to be wrong, given that the metro should add almost half of that number just by 2020, and the trends are for even stronger growth with time, not less. If they’re planning for 500K, they need to plan for it by 2030. By 2050, there will be close to double that figure added. I would think the figure being so underestimated will have long-term impacts as far as infrastructure goes.

    Another thing that annoys me is the claim that Delaware County is the fastest-growing. Sure, by % it is, but it has a MUCH lower threshold. In totals, Franklin County destroyed Delaware County in growth. Franklin County is the fastest-growing in the state by the metric that actually matters- total people moving there.

    If this rate of growth is correct and holds up at the 2020 census they are way off. If we added 120,000 in just five years, by 2020 that will be nearly a quarter million more people just from 2010 to 2020! Will this kind of growth continue though?

    Also where the hell are all of these people moving to? We don’t seem to be building enough housing to take in 90,000 more people in the last five years in Franklin County? Which makes you wonder even more about the ‘relative’ lack of growth of our downtown housing situation.

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