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2013 NHL All Star Game in Columbus

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Sports 2013 NHL All Star Game in Columbus

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 37 total)
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  • #479380

    ehill27
    Participant

    ^ crapola.

    1.8 million people is not a college town.

    #479381

    RBloodworth
    Participant

    Austin would disagree with you. They’re secure in their image, and don’t have any desire to enter into the civic Ponzi scheme that big-time pro sports have become.

    #479382

    ehill27
    Participant

    How about Cinci and Cleveland? Where’s your threshold between major league sports city and college town?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_of_United_States_Metropolitan_Statistical_Areas

    #479383

    RBloodworth
    Participant

    Different story entirely. Both of those cities received their pro sports franchises at a point in their histories when they were A LOT bigger than they currently are. It’s been more than 40 years since either of those cities have received an expansion team (the new Browns are a special circumstance), and both cities STILL have considerably more people in their metropolitan regions than Columbus does.

    Look, I’m not trying to denigrate Columbus by saying that we’re not a pro sports town; just acknowledging reality. To be honest, I don’t think we need major league sports to be a great city. A large part of what makes this city a unique and special place is its relationship with OSU and its sports teams. Let’s focus on what this city does well and be the best at that, rather than try to be something we’re not.

    #479384
    Caleb
    Caleb
    Participant

    RBloodworth said:
    Different story entirely. Both of those cities received their pro sports franchises at a point in their histories when they were A LOT bigger than they currently are. It’s been more than 40 years since either of those cities have received an expansion team (the new Browns are a special circumstance), and both cities STILL have considerably more people in their metropolitan regions than Columbus does.

    Yet we have a bigger city population… honestly we support two(or three) major leagues in this city…. I’m pretty sure we can stablize the ones we currently ha e. Nobody likes a team with a poor record. Its just sports.

    #479385
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    So if we shouldn’t have pro sports in this city, does that mean we shouldn’t spend money on the arts in this city because there are many out there who just don’t like art? Should we not spend money on parks because not everyone uses them and many think it’s a waste of funds? Should we not spend money to pursue light rail because some people living here think it’s a boondoggle? The point I’m getting at is that different people visit and move to this city for different things, because we have a variety of amenities. Having that in Columbus promotes a variety of residents. Many people have chose to move here, whether you believe it or not, because of our choices in sports entertainment. I personally would not want to move to a city that lacks a pro sports team, but that’s just me. There are many out there like me. It’s another tool of attraction for this city and we need all the tools we can get.

    And yes, Columbus is big and rich enough to support pro sports. A 1.8 million metro is nothing to laugh at. When the team starts winning, the people will come.

    #479386
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    We still have the fencing.

    #479387
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    RBloodworth said:
    Let’s stop pretending that we’re anything but a big college town, and own it!

    You’re more than welcome to pretend that college football is the only thing that matters and enjoy it. No reason that anyone else needs to think that way.

    #479388

    RBloodworth
    Participant

    With all due respect, I didn’t say that “college football is the only thing that matters” in this city. My point- made out of resigned frustration and disgust at the current state of professional sports, more than anything else- was that our city shouldn’t be wasting its time investing so much time and capital into a glorified welfare program for billionaire owners and millionaire players that treats its fans and community like garbage. Rather than play this game like a number of other cities, we should embrace our unique identity as the greatest college sports city in the country, and pour our efforts into emphasizing some of the other exciting things (the arts, our food scene, development, etc.) that are happening here. I honestly feel terrible for the business owners and civic leaders here that are going to lose millions of dollars in revenue because of a suicidal labor dispute.

    #479389

    News
    Participant

    NHL cancels All-Star Game, ‘feels badly’ for Columbus hockey fans
    Business First by Doug Buchanan, Managing editor
    Date: Saturday, November 24, 2012, 7:15am EST

    The National Hockey League made official what Columbus Blue Jackets fans have been dreading for months by cancelling the city’s long-awaited shot at hosting the NHL All-Star Game.

    READ MORE: http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/2012/11/nhl-cancels-all-star-game-feels.html

    #479390

    ehill27
    Participant

    Lockout has chilling effect Downtown
    By Michael Arace – Columbus Dispatch
    11.24.2012 at 05:43 AM EST

    From this perch in Columbus, one can only applaud the dopes conspiring to extend the NHL lockout, now in its 70th day. Another chunk of the season, as well as the All-Star Game that was scheduled for Nationwide Arena, were officially wiped out yesterday. Burn, baby, burn. One can argue that the next best thing for Blue Jackets fans would be to kill the whole season.

    There is just one caveat, and it is an important one: The lockout has been an economic detriment to our area and it has hurt some people who can least afford it.

    READ MORE: http://bluejacketsxtra.dispatch.com/content/stories/2012/11/24/lockout-has-chilling-effect-downtown.html

    #479391
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    I’m surprised anyone has even noticed the lockout. Seems like a non-event in town.

    #479392

    YAWN..

    We are over the mediocrity of the CBJ, and just don’t care.

    It’s JUST hockey.

    That said: it sucks for the bar and restaurant owners in the district that are going broke and the staff that are not getting paid, but they too will find other work.

    #479393

    brothermarcus
    Participant

    MoneyDragon said:
    but they too will find other work.

    You have employment for them? Try finding permanent employment this time of year, especially to replace the jobs they were working at the arena.

    I believe the cancellation allows all of the people who had paid for tickets in order to secure their seats for the all-star game to get their money back. Lots of checks will be coming out of the CBJ offices this week, and I wonder how many of those fans choose not to spend money with them next year. What a cluster**** of greed the NHL is.

    #479394

    News
    Participant

    No-Star Weekend
    BEN ZENITSKY

    Nov. 23 was a different kind of Black Friday for Columbus, quipped longtime Columbus Dispatch sports columnist Aaron Portzline. While throngs of holiday shoppers swarmed malls looking for deals the day after Thanksgiving, the National Hockey League made the call very few were surprised to hear: Its annual All-Star Weekend, set for Columbus on Jan. 26 and 27, would be canceled due to the ongoing lockout.

    READ MORE: http://www.columbusmonthly.com/January-2013/No-Star-Weekend/

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 37 total)

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