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192 year old UA house in danger of being demolished

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion 192 year old UA house in danger of being demolished

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  • #99559

    DouginCMH
    Participant

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2013/11/08/192-year-old-house-may-be-razed-by-developers.html

    Quote:
    With little notice and little money, the Upper Arlington Historical Society is scrambling to delay the destruction of a 192-year-old stone house built by a Revolutionary War veteran.

    The Hutchinson House, which features two rooms with large fireplaces at each end and walnut mantels and beams, was built beginning in 1821 on the farm of Amaziah Hutchinson, justice of the peace in what was then Norwich Township.

    But the house could be demolished as soon as Monday — Veterans Day — as a Westerville developer clears land along Riverside Drive, south of Bethel Road, to build a four-story luxury apartment building overlooking the Scioto River.

    Profoundly distressing.

    #554117

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    History means nothing to those driven by profit.

    #554118

    A161830
    Participant

    This project has been on the drawing board for many months and the City of UA has known about it just as long. Its a shame that they’re scrambling at the last minute to save this house when better coordination between the City and the Historical Society could have avoided what appears to be a lost cause.

    #554119

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    Sad to say but I doubt it’s going to be saved.

    #554120

    labi
    Participant

    No, I think this one is on the developer. What kind of human being could fill out a demolition permit application for a 192-year-old house and not think “there must be a better way,” then make a couple phone calls to see what could be set in motion.

    #554121

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    labi said:
    No, I think this one is on the developer. What kind of human being could fill out a demolition permit application for a 192-year-old house and not think “there must be a better way,” then make a couple phone calls to see what could be set in motion.

    Developers are in business to make money, they don’t really care about the community unless it affects their business somehow.

    #554122
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    Analogue Kid said:
    Developers are in business to make money, they don’t really care about the community unless it affects their business somehow.

    Sounds like the community didn’t care about the house either until the developer came along.

    Like a little kid that couldn’t care less about a toy until he sees his little sister playing with it.

    #554123

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    Maybe they cared but couldn’t match the developer’s money.

    #554124
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    Well, per the article the developer paid about $260k. That is certainly not chump change, but it seems like an attainable amount especially in a city with the size and means of Upper Arlington.

    #554125

    buckeyecpa
    Participant

    It’s amazing how everyone on here always wants to save something. Old places are expensive to do anything to. Realistically many people that have the money to afford the rehab are not interested in doing so. Just because something is over 100 years old doesn’t mean it always needs to be saved. If something historic happened at the site then I can understand. Even moving the house to a new location would be too expensive. At some point you have to ask yourself is it really worth it.

    #554126

    DouginCMH
    Participant

    A 192 year old house built by a veteran of the Revolutionary War?

    Yes, I would say that’s worth it. I mean, we can disagree, of course. But it’s not like structures from this era are a dime a dozen in central Ohio.

    #554127
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    You know, I think in the grand scheme of things, it would be a net positive for the universe if this house is saved.

    But this house is 192 years old and nobody cared about it until exactly one day before demolition. Every entity in the position to save the house has dropped the ball for literally generations.

    The UA historical society isn’t offering money. The City of UA doesn’t want to pay. The only group being asked to give anything up is the big bad developer.

    #554128

    buckeyecpa
    Participant

    DouginCMH said:
    A 192 year old house built by a veteran of the Revolutionary War?

    Yes, I would say that’s worth it. I mean, we can disagree, of course. But it’s not like structures from this era are a dime a dozen in central Ohio.

    So, it gets saved because it isn’t a dime a dozen. But does it matter to people in another few years? I’ve lived in this area for many years and this is the first I’ve heard about this house and it’s past. Does this mean the house isn’t as significant as many would believe. Being cool or great because the era that it was built in doesn’t mean it should be saved. By moving it to the parks it will take future funding for upkeep that will eventually be placed on the parks budget. No one is going to finance the move and upkeep of this house for future years to just let it sit in a park.

    #554129

    columbusmike
    Participant

    Analogue Kid said:
    Developers are in business to make money, they don’t really care about the community unless it affects their business somehow.

    I’m sure not all developers are the evil villain you might pin them as. Looking at the building, I think many wouldn’t think twice about leveling it…I’m guessing they were unaware of the history behind it.

    #554130

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    By moving it to the parks it will take future funding for upkeep that will eventually be placed on the parks budget. No one is going to finance the move and upkeep of this house for future years to just let it sit in a park.

    Ah well, there is the “dam keeper’s house” at Griggs, a larger comparable structure, that was badly falling apart. The city paid for a new roof and boarding it up to keep out vandals, including a fence around it, and a few years later a big tree fell on it and crunched part of the roof. So it stands now. They didn’t have a plan for its use before that incident, and now it’s back to needing substantial repair.

    2007:

    http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2007/04/09/focus1.html?page=all

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