Our City Online

Messageboard - Development

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

New Eight-Story City of Columbus Office Building

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development New Eight-Story City of Columbus Office Building

This topic contains 91 replies, has 30 voices, and was last updated by  WJT 3 years ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 92 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #972605

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    It doesn’t matter the height of the building it just seems like this city wants to tear down and start over so quickly. Do we really need the green space they are planning for the project? How about the land they are building the parking garage on? I’m no expert but the building seems pretty structural sound.

    I’m also totally against the new Parking garage being built when the project could probably hold at least 4 or 5 stories of parking underneath.

    You’re right, I see you don’t have expertise about 109 North Front. It is actually two buildings joined together, and the floor levels don’t match up between the two. This makes handicap access a nightmare. The building is not set up well for 21st century offices, is not energy efficient, and trying to retrofit it would be ungodly expensive. While tearing down old buildings certainly isn’t fun, it’s the only logical solution here.

    As far as the parking garage goes, they have the right idea as well. It wasn’t specified in the article because it’s not a done deal, but the city is probably going to buy the parking lot on the northwest corner of Long & Front. I think most people would agree that parking garage > parking lot, especially because it’s not difficult to retrofit street level retail in the first floor if the demand warrants.

    #973035

    NDaEast
    Participant

    I’m sure this had to have been evaluated, but it seems that Building and Development Services coming downtown from Carolyn Avenue is not very customer-friendly. Unless the City can come up with a better parking solution, it seems like it will be a pain in the butt to come downtown find and pay for parking to do all the things that have to be done planning, zoning, and executing construction projects. I may be off-base here since I am just relaying my personal experiences, but I’m surprised the building industry hasn’t objected.

    #973129
    Stephen43215
    Stephen43215
    Participant

    In less than a mile I counted 9 large parking structures along Front Street that’s not including the surface lots or the parking garages that cluster in the Arena District behind Front. I get we are going to lose another building but couldn’t the city at least put a little more thought into the parking part of the project?? Is this really the best solution for the space being 2 blocks from the wonderful new riverfront?

    #973424
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    In less than a mile I counted 9 large parking structures along Front Street that’s not including the surface lots or the parking garages that cluster in the Arena District behind Front.

    The number of garages doesn’t really matter, though. The more important question is — are those garages used? Or not used?

    #973517
    Stephen43215
    Stephen43215
    Participant

    It matters to make a city more vibrant and active, also to the pedestrians walking on Front Street. Nobody will be attracted to a street with northing but parking. I still see it as being such a waste of prime real estate right in the middle of a urban core. Its almost like a dead zone.

    #973518
    Stephen43215
    Stephen43215
    Participant

    Something more mixed use for the space +100! A single standing parking structure that will stand in this space for 50 or so years is so negative!

    #973549

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    I don’t object to a parking garage, but parking garages are not created equal. It shouldn’t *just* be a garage, with no street presence or connection to the surrounding area. There are 27 garages and more than 300 surface lots Downtown. Not a one of them has that connection. We can build better. Just because it’s a city garage doesn’t change that.

    #973552

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Stephen43215 wrote:</div>
    In less than a mile I counted 9 large parking structures along Front Street that’s not including the surface lots or the parking garages that cluster in the Arena District behind Front.

    The number of garages doesn’t really matter, though. The more important question is — are those garages used? Or not used?

    But the intense concentration of massive single-use parking garages is a major detriment to the vitality of this area of downtown. Adding yet another one into the mix, on one of the last open developable lots, does matter a lot. The city already owns one structured garage directly across the street. How to best utilize existing assets and encourage alternate modes of commuting should be the focus of the discussion, not building more garages.

    There are more than ample parking spots in the area now if workers could only bear to walk a couple blocks from their car to the office. If rush hour commuters were better incentivised to park further afield in existing facilities or take advantage of transit, the adjacent spots would still be available for short-term customers/visitors, and productive uses could be developed on surface lots to lessen the complete “dead zone” there now.

    The city shouldn’t contribute to and exacerbate an existing problem downtown, they should be proactive and work to find a better solution. COTA’s new headquarters doesn’t provide any parking spaces directly on-site, and yet their workers have still managed to find reasonable parking and transit accommodations from what exists in the immediate area.

    #975565

    tonloc620
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Walker Evans wrote:</div>

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Stephen43215 wrote:</div><br>
    In less than a mile I counted 9 large parking structures along Front Street that’s not including the surface lots or the parking garages that cluster in the Arena District behind Front.

    The number of garages doesn’t really matter, though. The more important question is — are those garages used? Or not used?

    But the intense concentration of massive single-use parking garages is a major detriment to the vitality of this area of downtown. Adding yet another one into the mix, on one of the last open developable lots, does matter a lot. The city already owns one structured garage directly across the street. How to best utilize existing assets and encourage alternate modes of commuting should be the focus of the discussion, not building more garages.

    There are more than ample parking spots in the area now if workers could only bear to walk a couple blocks from their car to the office. If rush hour commuters were better incentivised to park further afield in existing facilities or take advantage of transit, the adjacent spots would still be available for short-term customers/visitors, and productive uses could be developed on surface lots to lessen the complete “dead zone” there now.

    The city shouldn’t contribute to and exacerbate an existing problem downtown, they should be proactive and work to find a better solution. COTA’s new headquarters doesn’t provide any parking spaces directly on-site, and yet their workers have still managed to find reasonable parking and transit accommodations from what exists in the immediate area.

    I couldn’t agree more, we refer to this area of downtown as the parking garage district. The streets in this area during rush hour are less than inviting especially with all the one way streets.

    #975682
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    But the intense concentration of massive single-use parking garages is a major detriment to the vitality of this area of downtown. Adding yet another one into the mix, on one of the last open developable lots, does matter a lot.

    I’m not advocating for the addition of a single-use parking garage. And I fully agree that developing open areas in this part of Downtown in a smart way would be beneficial for everyone.

    My point was that just because there are other parking garages nearby, it doesn’t mean that additional parking is not still required.

    #976079

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>heresthecasey wrote:</div>
    But the intense concentration of massive single-use parking garages is a major detriment to the vitality of this area of downtown. Adding yet another one into the mix, on one of the last open developable lots, does matter a lot.

    I’m not advocating for the addition of a single-use parking garage. And I fully agree that developing open areas in this part of Downtown in a smart way would be beneficial for everyone.

    My point was that just because there are other parking garages nearby, it doesn’t mean that additional parking is not still required.

    In principle, I agree with you. Especially if a private developer was proposing a residential or mixed-use building, additional parking would certainly be an expected component.

    But, because this is the City we’re talking about, and specifically it’s additional parking for their office workers, I honestly have absolutely zero faith in them to get this done right, or propose anything other than a single-use parking garage.

    #976112

    Pablo
    Participant

    Agree on the parking garage district. Garages should be hidden behind other uses. This automated garage used to be located immediately north of the Leveque tower:

    Modern robotic parking garages use less space than traditional garages which may offset the cost due to less land cost or more leasable commercial space that otherwise would have been taken up by parking. http://www.roboticparking.com/

    #976136

    MHJ
    Participant

    I’m not sure what other cities folks in this thread have visited, but no matter what, a block that is full of government office buildings is not going to be “vibrant.” And the government buildings on Front Street stretch from Rich Street to Long Street. It’s not meant to be the most walkable, exciting portion of downtown. The pedestrian can walk a block over to Civic Center Drive or High Street if he or she is interested in activity. Especially with the move of city offices from the North Side to downtown, there will be a need for parking for more city workers as well as for people coming downtown to take care of business. The vast majority of people are not going to take the bus to do their business.

    #976345

    InnerCore
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Stephen43215 wrote:</div>
    It doesn’t matter the height of the building it just seems like this city wants to tear down and start over so quickly. Do we really need the green space they are planning for the project? How about the land they are building the parking garage on? I’m no expert but the building seems pretty structural sound.

    I’m also totally against the new Parking garage being built when the project could probably hold at least 4 or 5 stories of parking underneath.

    You’re right, I see you don’t have expertise about 109 North Front. It is actually two buildings joined together, and the floor levels don’t match up between the two. This makes handicap access a nightmare. The building is not set up well for 21st century offices, is not energy efficient, and trying to retrofit it would be ungodly expensive. While tearing down old buildings certainly isn’t fun, it’s the only logical solution here.

    As far as the parking garage goes, they have the right idea as well. It wasn’t specified in the article because it’s not a done deal, but the city is probably going to buy the parking lot on the northwest corner of Long & Front. I think most people would agree that parking garage > parking lot, especially because it’s not difficult to retrofit street level retail in the first floor if the demand warrants.

    I agree with most here outside of the bolded part. If a parking garage is not designed with commercial space lining the street level then its extremely hard and in some cases not economically feasible to add it later.

    #1027112
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster
Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 92 total)

The forum ‘Development’ is closed to new topics and replies.