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Curry Up Brings New Approach To Indian Food

Lauren Sega Lauren Sega Curry Up Brings New Approach To Indian FoodRendering via Tim Lai ArchitecT.
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A new take on Indian cuisine is coming soon to Columbus. Curry Up, conceived and nearly executed by Vishal Patel, intends to suspend negative stereotypes that currently surround Indian restaurants. And for the American public still wary about Indian food, he hopes to offer a more approachable outlet.

“Everyone has that statement about Indian restaurants, where you walk in and things are going to be guaranteed,” Patel said. “‘Food is gonna be really spicy; you’re gonna get bad customer service; the place isn’t going to be as clean.’ Just those negative stereotypes that kind of go along with it, and we want to change that.”

curry-up-02To start things off, Patel plans on greenery everywhere. Mint, parsley, cilantro — each of the herbs will be grown within feet of the Curry Up kitchen, and Patel hopes to use the accompanying Curry Leaf Tree for his curry recipes. To keep the tree alive, he’ll probably only use a few leaves every once in a while to make sure the tree lives a healthy life. But Patel assures the kitchen will be at least 90 percent made from scratch.

Curry Up will offer a variety of sauces and spice levels. Patel said each of the sauces are individually created, not blended from base sauces. He stressed that it was a completely different approach than traditional Indian restaurants. Every menu item is considered for its healthfulness.

“The best way I’d like to describe it is we’re more a modern take on Indian cuisine,” Patel said. “All the ingredients that we use are found in Indian cuisine; they just haven’t been put together in this way.”

The service style is individualistic. Guests will come in and pick which ingredients they want in their meal. After sitting down, Patel said a full-service waitstaff will be available for napkins, drink refills and whatever else is needed. He said that, in this way, the restaurant has a hybrid service style.

Servers are yet to be hired, though, he said. His help in the kitchen will have to be well-rounded and prepared to take on manager-like duties. He hopes to prepare his staff for a future in the restaurant business as well has have qualified help during his recovery period.

Patel was in a near-fatal car accident on the eve of Independence Day.

He lost control of his car after a 20-hour work day. Patel said he went into a ditch and hit a storm drain that caused his car to jump. He hit a mailbox and then the outside of a rail. The car rolled five times until he fell into a creek. Patel broke several ribs, got a concussion, and fractured his back.

Vishal Patel — Photo by Walker Evans.

Vishal Patel — Photo by Walker Evans.

“I was extremely lucky to be alive,” he said. “It’s gonna be difficult, but I’m starting physical therapy, and by the end of the month, when we expect to open, I’m hoping I can — I’m not sure if I’ll be 100 percent there, but I’d at least like to — be 50-60 percent the way there and then slowly just work my way back in.”

The site is still under construction, but Patel hopes to open Curry Up on Sawmill Road by the last week of September or first week of October.

Renderings via Tim Lai ArchitecT.

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