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Council Selects 15 Finalists for Vacancies Left by Stinziano and Page

Lauren Sega Lauren Sega Council Selects 15 Finalists for Vacancies Left by Stinziano and Page
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Columbus City Council has narrowed down a list of finalists to fill the two vacancies left by Michael Stinziano and Jaiza Page, who both won their elections this year. Fifty-six people applied, from which 15 finalists have been chosen. After a public hearing, Page’s successor will be chosen in January 2019. A date has not yet been set to select Stinziano’s successor.

Following is a list of the 15 finalists, along with their job experience, priorities, and a quote from their application essay.

Nicholas J. Bankston

  • Experience:

Project Manager for the City of Columbus’ Department of Neighborhoods (2017 — present); Director of Community Affairs for the Mayor’s office (2015 — 2017); Outreach Director for Andrew Ginther for Mayor (Jan. 2015 — Nov. 2015)

Presently on the boards of the Columbus Urban League Young Professionals, the Rickenbacker-Woods Foundation, and the Reeb Avenue Center

  • Priorities:

Education, housing, transportation

  • What he had to say:

“Accessibility to jobs, education, healthcare, food, family and friends is essential to the quality of life of our residents and the sustainability of our growth. A city that is accessible by all and to all provides opportunity for all.”

Lourdes Barroso De Padilla

  • Experience:

VP of National Events at City Year Inc. (2012 — present); Director of Latina Mentoring Academy (2009 — present); Executive Director of City Year Columbus (2006 — 2012)

Served for Adelante Latino Democrats, the Create Columbus Commission, Directions for Youth and Families, and United Way of Central Ohio Diversity & Inclusion Committee, among other service organizations

  • Priorities:

Economic mobility, affordable housing, workforce development

  • What she had to say:

“As we ensure steady and continuous growth that attracts talent and big business we have an obligation to create communities that are economically balanced by keeping affordable housing options in communities where significant investments are being made.”

Stefanie Lynn Coe

  • Experience:

Secretary, General Counsel, and Director of Health & Safety at MPW Industrial Services Group, Inc. (2009 — 2018); Associate General Counsel at MPW Industrial Services Group, Inc. (2006 — 2009); Assistant City Attorney — Environmental Prosecution (2005 — 2006); Assistant City Attorney (2004 — 2005)

Presently serves for the City of Columbus Civil Service Commission, the Association of Corporate Council, the Columbus Bar Association, The Ohio State Bar Association, The American Bar Association, and the Ohio Women’s Bar Association

  • Priorities:

City leadership in state and national issues (immigration, gun control, etc.), police-community relations, affordable housing

  • What she had to say:

“I believe council is at a critical ‘fork in the road’ with respect to how it leads in the future. Two members of Council are moving on to other roles, both attorneys, and this will leave Columbus with no attorneys on City Council. Many issues that Council must address have important legal consequences and I believe that someone with a legal background can help provide insight to the other members of Council and the community as those issues are considered.”

Nancy Day-Achauer

  • Experience:

Ordained Minister and Director of Addiction Ministries at the United Methodist Church (2008 — Present); Executive Assistant to SVP, General Counsel at Dignity Health (2000 — 2005); Executive Assistant, Chase H & Q (March 2000 — August 2000)

Launched the Hilltop Senior Services Initiative; co-founded the Prairie Township Community Health Action Team; founded the United Westside Coalition

  • Priorities:

Opiate epidemic, economic segregation

  • What she had to say:

“Poverty is a complicated, systemic social issue necessitating attention to a variety of contributors including, but not limited to: education, transportation, childcare, housing, trauma, and employment. With 42 percent of job gains in the metro area being lower-wage jobs, the solution is not simply more jobs. We need to address the spectrum of social determinants with a multifaceted approach which will require public/private partnerships.”

Rob Dorans

  • Experience:

Chief Legal Counsel of the Legal & Research Department at ACT Ohio (2013 — present); Recreation & Parks Commissioner for the City’s Recreation & Parks Department (2016 — present); Research Associate for the Legal & Research Department at ACT Ohio (2011 — 2013)

Admitted to the Ohio State Bar Association and the Columbus Bar Association

Currently a member of the American Constitution Society — Columbus Chapter, the National Alliance for Fair Contracting, the Franklin County Democratic Party Executive Committee, and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local Union 683

Volunteers for Big Brothers & Big Sisters of Central Ohio and the Columbus Legal Aid Society

  • Priorities:

Housing, workforce development

  • What he had to say:

“Continued economic development requires the availability of a skilled local work force which meets the demands of employers. Columbus’ growth has been spurred by a dynamic, skilled, and educated workforce that has matched the needs of expanding employers in the City and region. By working with community partners, the City has the opportunity to ensure businesses have access to the skilled labor it needs, but also provide increased economic prosperity for residents.”

Albert Edmonson

  • Experience:

Owner and operator at A Cut Above the Rest barber shop (1993 — present); Neighborhood Revitalization Coordinator at the City of Columbus (2008 — present); Center for Clinical and Transitional Science Investigator (2015 — 2018)

Presently serves as President for the Mount Vernon Avenue District Improvement Association, as Founder and President of Making A Difference, Inc., and as Minority Outreach Coordinator for the Ohio Democratic Party

A Gulf War veteran, Edmonson served in the U.S. Army from 1987 until his Honorable Discharge in 1993, and was awarded the Bronze Star for bravery

  • Priorities:

Affordable housing, living wages

  • What he had to say:

“As a Columbus business owner, in a district that has been economically distressed for decades, I’ve witness the struggles families go through to make ends meet. Of course, the housing discussion is directly tied to the issues of income inequality and workers who are underprepared for the 21st century economy. I want to help make Columbus a national leader in skilled jobs training. It’s time to seriously disrupt the cycle of poverty, wherever it exists in our city.”

Shayla D. Favor

  • Experience:

Assistant City Attorney (2014 — present); Legal Investigator Paralegal at the City Attorney’s office (2013 — 2014); Legal Intake Officer at the City Attorney’s office (2012 — 2013); Law Clerk at the City Attorney’s office (2011 — 2012)

Currently serves as a member of the Creative Control Fest and the Columbus Urban League Young Professionals

  • Priorities:

Abating nuisance properties, housing

  • What she had to say:

“I would love to play a more significant role in our City’s effort to reduce economic disparity starting with addressing the affordable housing crisis. The abatement of nuisance properties across columbus has helped to revitalize vulnerable communities that had been overlooked in the past. The resurgence of communities like Milo-Grogan, Franklinton, Olde Towne East, and King-Lincoln cannot be at the expense of long-term residents who are unable to compete with the rising costs of rent.”

Catherine A. Girves

  • Experience:

Executive Director of Yay Bikes! (2013 — present); Founder and Executive Director of University Area Enrichment Association (2003 — 2013)

Currently part of the Transportation Policy Committee at the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC), the MORPC Community Advisory Council, the Franklin County Democratic Party Central Committee, and the Franklin County Democratic Women’s Club

  • Priorities:

Safe neighborhoods, affordable housing, living wages, transportation

  • What she had to say:

“Sustainable development is essential to continue providing residents exceptional public services. Sprawl stresses our capacity to fiscally and environmentally support development with adequate policing, clean water, quality healthcare, and good transportation options. Council’s emphasis on infill development, sustainable transportation, and green infrastructure is essential to mitigate impacts of climate change and create strong, healthy neighborhoods of choice.”

Chenelle Jones

  • Experience:

Program Chair of Public Safety Programs at Franklin University (2018 — present); Lead Faculty of Criminal Justice Administration at Franklin University (2017 — 2018); Assistant Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Ohio Dominican University (2012 — 2017); Adjunct Professor for Texas Southern University (2011 — 2012)

Serves on various committees at Franklin University, including the Diversity Dimensions Committee, the Student Success Initiative Committee, and the Assessment Committee

Has published non-peer reviewed and peer-reviewed volumes, book chapters, articles, reports and presentations on criminal justice reform, race discrimination, civic engagement and recidivism

Currently a Graduate Research Fellowship Program Reviewer for the National Institute of Justice and the National Director of Research for the Teen and Police Service Academy

  • Priorities:

Infant mortality, public safety, education

  • What she had to say:

“According to Columbus Public Health, the infant mortality rate is 7.8 per 1,000 live births, implying a rich opportunity to expand initiatives like Celebrate One to improve prenatal care to expecting mothers and offer better healthcare to newborn babies. In 2017, the City of Columbus experienced a record 143 homicides, demonstrating a critical need to enhance safety initiatives and improve police/community relations. In 2018, the Ohio Department of Education gave Columbus City Schools a failing grade on theOhio School Report Card, a clear indicator of the need to implement innovative pedagogical approaches and enhanced tutoring initiatives, especially in underserved communities.”

Marco Miller

  • Experience:

Agent and Owner at Marco Miller Insurance; President and Co-Founder of Grassroots Strategies; Co-owner of Friday’s Creations; former Lieutenant and EMT at the Columbus Division of Fire

Member of Veterans of Foreign Wars, Knights of Columbus Marion Council, AMVETS Post 2000, Stonewall Democrats of Central Ohio, and the Franklin County Democratic Party Central & Executive Committees

  • Priorities:

Opioid crisis, employment, housing, renewable energy

  • What he had to say:

“While Columbus has seen tremendous growth in the past few decades, we have seen many hardships hit residents such as the opioid crisis, continued pockets of high employment disparity, and blight. I would be honored to join the council to work with you as we look for the solutions Columbus needs for our residents to keep Columbus the best place to work, live, and raise a family.”

Michelle Moskowitz Brown

  • Experience:

Executive Director of Local Matters (2014 — present); Director of Operations of Local Matters (2011 — 2013); Director of Operations for the Foundation for Jewish Culture (2006 — 2010)

Served on the board of InHealth Mutual and VSA

  • Priorities:

Education, housing, transit, food accessibility

  • What she had to say:

“Like most US cities, Columbus suffered from disinvestment in the 1970s, and was negatively impacted by highways that cut through neighborhoods and cut people off from each other, needed services, and capital. These data manifest in our day-to-day lives: if you live south of Franklinton, your life expectancy is 26 years less than if you live in Dublin, Ohio…If you live east of I-71 in Linden, you do not have convenient access to a supermarket. To address the challenges facing Columbus, we have to anticipate what changing markets will mean for residents — whether it comes to transportation, jobs, or food access.”

Rick Neal

  • Experience:

Candidate for U.S. Congress in Ohio’s 15th district (2017 — 2018); Executive Committee Member of the Ohio Democratic Party (2012 — 2016); volunteer and supporter of other Democratic campaigns (2008 — 2016)

Active partner with Equality Ohio, Stonewall Democrats, and Stonewall Center

Has advocated for humanitarian needs in central Africa, Oxfam UK, Burundi, Jordan and D.R. Congo; served in the Peace Corp as an education and public health volunteer in Morocco

  • Priorities:

Economic inequality, opioid crisis

  • What he had to say:

“As Mayor Ginther has explained, our challenge for 2019 and beyond is that while two-thirds of our city has never done better, one-third is still struggling…The contrast in Franklin County between increases in median annual household income that are better than the state as a whole, and a poetry rate that is worse, is just one sign that even for folks who work full-time, it is increasingly difficult to get ahead. Looking ahead, economic storm clouds are on the horizon, gathering due to risk of recession but also from the disruptive technologies like automation and artificial intelligence — and we need to be prepared to weather the storm.”

Ramona Reyes

  • Experience:

Director of Our Lady of Guadalupe Center, Catholic Social Services (2015 — present); Columbus Board of Education board member (2009 — present); Human Resources Specialist at Nationwide Insurance Enterprise (1992 — 2015)

Serves on the East Coast migrant Headstart Board, the Mt. Carmel School of Nursing Board, Columbus Association for the Performing Arts board, and the NAACP Chair of Elections Steering Committee; volunteers with Big Brothers Big Sisters

Associate Publisher of Who’s Who in Latino Columbus

  • Priorities:

Poverty, housing, education

  • What she had to say:

“Columbus has expanded its boundaries, and while this growth has generated more employment and new neighborhoods, there is a constant challenge to balance growth with providing essential and high quality services to all our neighborhoods.”

Sam Shim

  • Experience:

VP of Worthington City Schools Board of Education (2016 — present); Worthington City Schools Board Member (2014 — 2016); Advisory Board Member at FCBank (2018 — present); Founder and President of the Ohio State University Asian & Pacific Islander Alumni Society (2016 — present); VP of the Family Mentor Foundation (2017 — present)

  • Priorities:

Development, economic segregation, public safety, education

  • What he had to say:

“We need to sustain policies that raise wages and ensure affordable healthcare for all residents. Rising wages, along with workforce development, help to counter food insecurity and soaring rents. Affordable housing is especially near and dear to my heart. My family struggled with it. Growing up, my two brothers and I all shared one crowded bedroom. Gentrification is causing housing to be unaffordable for local residents, and senior citizens to be priced out of their neighborhoods.”

Erin Synk

  • Experience:

Director of Government Relations for LNE Group (2009 — present); Policy Aide to Speaker of the House at the Ohio House Democratic Caucus (2009); Legislative Aide at the Ohio House of Representatives (2006 — 2009)

Currently serves as Commissioner and Vice-Chair for the Columbus South Side Area Commission, as Commissioner for the Community Safety Advisory Commission, as board member for YayBikes!, and as a community member of the South Side Human Trafficking Task Force

  • Priorities:

Transportation, housing, education

  • What she had to say:

“As a member of the Columbus South Side Area Commission, I work with a diverse community. Alongside residents, I strive to address infrastructure and housing issues that will serve us not just today, but tomorrow. I have seen first-hand how seemingly small decisions, such as where to place a cross walk, can alter the opportunities afforded to our neighbors. The best solutions are formed when a variety of people, perspectives, and experiences are at the table.”

Council is having interviews this week with all of the finalists. There will be a public hearing on the list of finalists being considered on Jan. 10, 2019 at 5 p.m.

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