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Columbus Natural Winery to Attend Global Wine Fair in New York

Lauren Sega Lauren Sega Columbus Natural Winery to Attend Global Wine Fair in New York
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Unlike craft beer, natural, “biodynamic” wine has taken a while to take off in the United States, but the trend may not be too far away. The RAW wine fair, featuring hundreds of vintners from dozens of countries, will be in the states for the first time, and Via Vecchia — Columbus’ own natural winery — will attend.

“In 2003 I brought my grandfather’s winemaking equipment from Europe to Columbus,” said Paolo Rosi, Via Vecchia Co-owner and Vintner in a press release. “I shared with my friends the natural winemaking techniques I’d learned from my Tuscan father, and that led to founding the winery here in the Brewery District.”

Rosi and wine merchants like him hold wine to a high standard. His winery is one of only a few American wineries to be at the RAW fair, an event committed to celebrating “wines with emotion,” and wines that say something about their country of origin. But it’s not just about the end product; the process through which the vintner makes the wine is crucial.

“Our wines have always been honest – we use natural yeasts that arrive on the grapes and are in the environment, causing spontaneous fermentation and retaining the true terroir and character of the grape,” Rosi said. “Our winemaking relies upon a meticulous and labor-intensive process to bring a minimal intervention wine to the public. Our wines taste clean and contain the mark of a natural wine.”

Wineries like Via Vecchia often have a cult following of “wine snobs,” who strongly oppose the marketing-centric nature of most wines found in a Kroger or Weiland’s in favor of living wine. These connoisseurs, as well as amateurs will be at the RAW fair in New York to taste new wines as well as old favorites.

Rosi hopes that with the fair’s presence in the United States, and with wineries like Via Vecchia committing to traditional farming and cellar practices and philosophies, natural wine is taking off in the country and in Columbus.

“The fair’s expansion to New York shows the American public’s interest in high-integrity wines,” said Rosi. “But here in Columbus we’ve been ahead of the trend. Wineries don’t have to list all the adjustments and additives put into wines; this has allowed some to hide behind marketing and slick labels and not declare their treatments.”

The RAW fair will hit New York on November 6 and 7. One and two-day tickets are available for $50 and $80 respectively.

For more information visit newyork.rawwine.com.

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