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Columbus Makes Art Presents: Glass Artist Michael Hric

Kim Nagorski Kim Nagorski Columbus Makes Art Presents: Glass Artist Michael HricMichael Hric's art will be on view as part of The Best of 2017 through June 18 at the Ohio Craft Museum.
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The Ohio Craft Museum will showcase work by its members in the annual juried exhibition, Best of 2017, now through June 18. Glass vessels by Columbus artist Michael Hric will be featured; Hric received the Artist Scholarship Award, which will allow him to attend a workshop at the Corning Museum of Glass in New York.

Kim: What drew you to glass as a medium?
Michael:
I began working with glass in the fall of 2003. During my first year at the Cleveland Institute of Art, I would visit the different departments when I had free moments between working on foundation course projects. One evening, I walked through the glass department and watched fourth- and fifth-year students blow glass. To say the least, I was mesmerized. At that moment, I knew glassblowing was what I wanted to pursue.

Kim: How long have you been working in Columbus?
Michael:
After graduating from the Cleveland Institute of Art in 2007, I moved to Columbus. Initially, I had no connections in the glass community and worked at Franklin Art Glass for about a year. My time there allowed me to learn about leaded glass and stained glass, which I had very minimal knowledge of at the time.

A year passed and an opportunity to assist another local artist presented itself. I began to assist multiple glass artists at Glass Axis and slowly began making my own work.

I now work as studio manager for Crystal Remembrance, which creates glass memorials. In my downtime, I can utilize the studio to create my art.

Reticulated Vessels by glass artist Michael Hric.

Kim: What process do you use to create your work?
Michael:
My current body of work employs the Venetian technique of applying cane to create my line patterns and color designs. The “reticulated” pattern within my work was born from altering a traditional cane technique.

I usually draw a small sketch of a form, which will then be made from glass. Many times, the initial sketch is only a base or foundation for a final piece. From the start, I keep elements of proportion, balance and shape in mind, but the line designs from the cane are unique in each piece.

During the creation of my pieces, especially sculptural work, a more pleasing and exciting form will take shape. Glass has the tendency to be its own creature. It will allow a certain amount of control, but you need to be able to know what it desires. Over time, manipulation of the material has become second nature.

Kim: What is the importance of being juried into the Ohio Craft Museum’s Best of 2017?
Michael:
The Best of 2017 offers me a chance to share my work with collectors and enthusiasts within Ohio. It also allows me to see what other artists and craftspeople are creating within our community. Each year, I am impressed with the quality of work presented through “Best of.”

The Best of 2017 will be on view through June 18 at the Ohio Craft Museum, 1665 W. Fifth Ave., Columbus 43212. Hours are Monday–Friday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Saturday–Sunday, 1-4 p.m. For details, see www.ohiocraft.org or call (614) 486-4402.

Columbus Makes Art Presents is a bi-weekly column brought to you by the Greater Columbus Arts Council – supporting art and advancing culture in Columbus. The column is a project of the Art Makes Columbus campaign, telling the inspiring stories of the people and organizations who create Columbus art. Each column will be written by a different local arts organization to give you an insiders look at how #artmakescbus.

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