entrepreneurs – ColumbusUnderground.com http://www.columbusunderground.com News, opinions and reviews on all things Columbus, Ohio. Sat, 24 Jun 2017 13:50:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 Startup Accelerator Announced as Part of Smart Columbus http://www.columbusunderground.com/startup-accelerator-announced-as-part-of-smart-columbus-bw1 http://www.columbusunderground.com/startup-accelerator-announced-as-part-of-smart-columbus-bw1#respond Mon, 08 May 2017 13:36:27 +0000 http://www.columbusunderground.com/?p=1165086 A Silicon Valley think tank will bring a ten-week startup accelerator program to Downtown Columbus in the fall, the latest in what has been a steady stream of announcements in recent months from the Smart Columbus team. Singularity University announced the program today, to be called the Smart City Accelerator. It will be open to […]]]>

A Silicon Valley think tank will bring a ten-week startup accelerator program to Downtown Columbus in the fall, the latest in what has been a steady stream of announcements in recent months from the Smart Columbus team.

Singularity University announced the program today, to be called the Smart City Accelerator. It will be open to both local and national businesses, ranging from two-person startups to established corporations (who would be able to send a small team).

Only ten businesses will be selected to take part in the program, which will run from September 12th to November 17th. The selected applicants will be eligible to receive up to $100,000 in funding from Columbus-based venture capital firm NCT Ventures.

“The SU Smart City Accelerator will attract innovators from around the world and amplify the successes Columbus already has achieved in becoming recognized as a global center of technology and innovation,” said Mayor Andrew Ginther in a press release.

“We are committed to giving the innovators and entrepreneurs who participate in this world-class accelerator program full access to our community as a living laboratory so that we can learn together what business models and technologies are going to make our cities better in the future for all people,” added Alex Fischer, President and CEO of the Columbus Partnership.

The program will be housed at 107 S. High St., with the selected businesses receiving access to co-working space in the building.

The website for potential applicants lists five broad areas of focus for businesses looking to participate:

  • Mobility (including logistics and automated vehicles)
  • Connectivity (including wireless and satellite technologies)
  • Data/Analytics (including artificial intelligence and machine learning)
  • Infrastructure/Energy (including battery technology, charging stations, and “alternative propulsion systems”)
  • Manufacturing/Production (including 3D printing and micro-manufacturing)

“When Columbus won the U.S. Department of Transportation Smart City Challenge, Singularity University wanted to be part of – and contribute to – the innovation ecosystem here,” said Nick Davis, Singularity University Vice President of Corporate Innovation.

The accelerator marks Singularity’s first long-term program outside of its home base in California.

The initial Smart City grant application had a relatively narrow focus – new technology would be used to improve access to transportation and to provide specific benefits for neighborhoods like Linden. Although those ideas are still being pursued, as more partners are brought in and more initiatives get placed under the Smart Columbus umbrella, the scope of the program has grown.

“This accelerator will empower entrepreneurs to leverage breakthroughs in technology, from autonomous vehicles to efficiencies made possible by object awareness, to enhance lives and improve standards of living,” said Rich Langdale, Managing Partner of NCT Ventures. “The Smart Cities initiative is more than a challenge. Civilization is at a turning point and Columbus has the opportunity to promote innovation and pioneer what it means to live in a smart city of the future.”

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Is Columbus Finally Embracing its “Tech City” Status? http://www.columbusunderground.com/tcetra-is-columbus-finally-embracing-its-tech-city-status-ls1 http://www.columbusunderground.com/tcetra-is-columbus-finally-embracing-its-tech-city-status-ls1#comments Tue, 07 Feb 2017 15:00:55 +0000 http://www.columbusunderground.com/?p=1156026 The path to launching a successful startup or tech career seems narrow and obscured, but local experts describe the Columbus tech scene as a roadmap, with the city having more express lanes to success than any other in the Midwest — or beyond. That’s the city’s message for potential talent. Tech talent, far from meeting […]]]>

The path to launching a successful startup or tech career seems narrow and obscured, but local experts describe the Columbus tech scene as a roadmap, with the city having more express lanes to success than any other in the Midwest — or beyond.

That’s the city’s message for potential talent. Tech talent, far from meeting current demand, wants to live in a tech-aware city overflowing with resources and success.

With CoverMyMeds’ recent acquisition by McKesson, that’s one success in the books. Before the company existed, patients could end up waiting days for prescriptions to be approved by their insurance company. Now, with businesses like CVS and Walgreens implementing their electronic prior authorization software, for physicians, pharmacists and millions of patients, life without CoverMyMeds is unimaginable. All that’s left for the city to do is convince tech professionals near and far that Columbus is a spot primed for creating more CoverMyMeds.

The company, founded in Twinsburg, funded by Cleveland-based JumpStart Ventures, further invested in by San Francisco-based Francisco Partners, and nurtured by Columbus and state resources, is a true culmination of efforts that is described in Columbus as “the broader community pulling together,” by Mike McCann, Vice President of Partner and Program Engagement at Rev1 Ventures.

Through advisement and public and private investment from Rev1 Ventures, Columbus 2020, NCT Ventures, Drive Capital and others, local startup entrepreneurs have access to an extensive support network. To fill those startups with smart, tech-savvy brains, they’ll need to continue creating ways to draw in outsiders and keep the homegrown at home.

Aside from showcasing success and touting resources, tech professionals need to see a city looking at IT for itself, and Columbus’ Smart City grant could be that pivoting point. Jung Kim, Managing Director of Research and Business Intelligence at Columbus 2020, said it’s a talking point for leaders of cities nationwide. Every metro area wants to be known for its tech innovation. The Smart Columbus project, funded by the grant awarded in June of last year, provides the opportunity to grow the city’s tech presence and prep the scene for more startups.

The City of Columbus, OSU, AEP, Battelle, Honda and about a dozen others are partnering in Smart Columbus to bring about smarter transportation technology, an effort that, on top of potentially inspiring new startups, could add more tech jobs to existing companies, a continuation of the ongoing trend.

“I think you do hear people in the tech scene talk that way: ‘Oh, tech is eating everything,’” Kim said. “I think a lot of the leaders, in whatever industry they’re in, they are thinking about tech.”

Kim talks about tech in Columbus as an exportable good. Huntington’s app development spread to Chase; Abercrombie and Fitch is advancing on-site personalization — “They’re producing it here and it’s being used in the US and around the world,” Kim said.

These local opportunities are often overlooked by Columbus’ own tech population. Programs like Venture for America, connecting recent grads with new companies, and Tech Elevator, offering training to those without a technical background, work to keep tech talent in Central Ohio. And, while students could easily remain within their university bubble for four years, unaware that Nationwide or L Brands are headquartered down the road, the university addresses thousands of freshman at orientation to inform them on Columbus career opportunities and attractions. More than just a place to go to work, the ideal city for the young professional is walkable and possesses a rich culture with plenty of bars, restaurants and venues to frequent. Like tech itself, the approach to feeding the market new and more innovative brains has to be all-encompassing.

“You hear a lot about Columbus being an open city, being a connected city,” McCann said. “That’s what’s so great about what’s going on here is that those dots are getting connected, and because of that, that starts to get the attention of the broader market and helps people see ‘Wow, this is the place to go’ for any type of job, whether it’s kind of what Columbus has historically been known for or in terms of technology.”

tc logo

Our new technology series is presented by our partners at TCETRA.

TCETRA is a software development company based in Dublin, Ohio. Since 2007, the company has been focused on serving the prepaid wireless industry through the development of specific business tools, software, and applications. Our team is made up of talented technical and creative professionals dedicated to delivering innovative solutions to complex problems and helping grow the technology community in Columbus and the Midwest.

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Re:work Furnishings Expanding into Larger Location http://www.columbusunderground.com/rework-furnishings-expanding-into-larger-location http://www.columbusunderground.com/rework-furnishings-expanding-into-larger-location#respond Mon, 23 Jan 2017 19:52:50 +0000 http://www.columbusunderground.com/?p=1154504 After less than two years operating out of a 2,000 square foot workshop just south of Grandview Heights, Re:work Furnishings is making the move to a much larger 10,000 square foot space just north of Grandview Heights. Husband-and-wife duo Alex and Lindsay Remley officially announced the move today, providing details about about that the news […]]]>

After less than two years operating out of a 2,000 square foot workshop just south of Grandview Heights, Re:work Furnishings is making the move to a much larger 10,000 square foot space just north of Grandview Heights. Husband-and-wife duo Alex and Lindsay Remley officially announced the move today, providing details about about that the news means for their business.

“This is exciting and humbling,” said Alex. “Columbus has so many talented, creative people doing cool shit. We’re honored to count many of them as partners — and to be pushing the envelope with them.”

The company has grown rapidly along with the rapid rise in the trend of reutilizing reclaimed barn wood for new furniture and decor, turning discarded lumber into popular items built for both homes and offices. In addition to residential clients, Re:work has created pieces for businesses including Homage, Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams, Abercrombie & Fitch, Giant Eagle and Watershed Kitchen & Bar.

“We are overwhelmed by Columbus’ support,” added Lindsay. “We are excited that customers share our passion for high-quality, sustainable pieces.”

Re:work originally launched as a home business in 2012, operating out of the Remley’s garage. Today, their new space at 1271 Edgehill Road will allow more work shop room and office space for their 10-person team.

For more information, visit www.reworkfurnishings.com.

All photos provided by Re:Work Furnishings.

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Local Alcohol Delivery Startup Partners with Blue Jackets for In-Seat Delivery Service http://www.columbusunderground.com/local-alcohol-delivery-startup-partners-with-blue-jackets-for-in-seat-delivery-service http://www.columbusunderground.com/local-alcohol-delivery-startup-partners-with-blue-jackets-for-in-seat-delivery-service#comments Tue, 17 Jan 2017 13:00:16 +0000 http://www.columbusunderground.com/?p=1153808 While Refill has been delivering alcohol to your doorstep, a new partnership with Nationwide Arena on the ARENA App will bring it directly to your seat. The owners of the Columbus-based app startup just signed a partnership deal with the Columbus Blue Jackets yesterday to provide in-seat delivery for hockey fans cheering on the team […]]]>

While Refill has been delivering alcohol to your doorstep, a new partnership with Nationwide Arena on the ARENA App will bring it directly to your seat. The owners of the Columbus-based app startup just signed a partnership deal with the Columbus Blue Jackets yesterday to provide in-seat delivery for hockey fans cheering on the team live at home games.

“From the moment we launched our direct-to-consumer model in late 2015, Refill has been positively disrupting the marketplace and providing a seamless purchasing experience and superior customer service,” stated Refill CMO Anthony Reynolds. “This announcement represents not only a revolution for Refill, but for the Columbus Blue Jackets. They are distinguishing themselves on the ice this season and we believe that with this announcement, the in-game experience at Nationwide Arena is now without peer.”

In addition to drinks, orders through the Arena App can be placed for food and merchandise, which is then delivered directly to your seat by a Nationwide Arena employee. The service is only available for those seated on the Club Level in Nationwide Arena. The app is available on both iPhone and Android devices.

Next up for Refill is the expansion into the Cleveland market for alcohol delivery, which is expected to go live on February 1st.

For more info, visit www.alcoholtogo.com.

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Forge Columbus Founder Reese Neader Passes Away http://www.columbusunderground.com/forge-columbus-founder-reese-neader-passes-away http://www.columbusunderground.com/forge-columbus-founder-reese-neader-passes-away#comments Wed, 14 Dec 2016 17:46:35 +0000 http://www.columbusunderground.com/?p=1150076 It was reported this afternoon that local community activist and entrepreneurial leader Reese Neader has passed away. “Reese died at 11:59 at Grant,” stated his father Jim Neader on Facebook. “Surrounded by loving family, friends and faith. May this gentle man be welcomed into gods heaven. Will update later with arraignments. He fought a long […]]]>

It was reported this afternoon that local community activist and entrepreneurial leader Reese Neader has passed away.

“Reese died at 11:59 at Grant,” stated his father Jim Neader on Facebook. “Surrounded by loving family, friends and faith. May this gentle man be welcomed into gods heaven. Will update later with arraignments. He fought a long hard battle and lived a wonderful life. Thank you all for your love and prayers.”

Neader had been hospitalized since September after being diagnosed with diabetes, and underwent several surgeries related to ongoing complications.

In 2014, Neader founded Forge Columbus, a local organization that invests in entrepreneurs who want to help build a better city. Forge provides small business services and access to capital to startups with a long-term goal of creating jobs and improving neighborhoods.

“A city that breaks down barriers for collaboration and uses new methods and technology to solve shared challenges has unlimited potential for growth,” wrote Neader in an article on Columbus Underground in 2014. “Columbus already has the energy, the skills, and the resources. We’re here to help.”

More recently, Neader led the efforts as a Kiva Fellow to designate Columbus as an official Kiva City back in July. Due to his leadership, he was able to rally community support to help raise $225,000 to fund future fellowships. Neader won the support of the City of Columbus for the effort, and Mayor Andrew Ginther made the Kiva City announcement a prominent part of his inaugural State of the City address.

“The initial $225,000 in grant support will be leveraged into $1 million in interest-free micro-loans to 200 new, underserved local entrepreneurs over a three-year period, promoting further business development and resulting in a $2 million incremental economic impact,” stated Ginther in February. “This is an opportunity for new local businesses in our community and our neighborhoods to thrive.”

While Neader will certainly be missed, his contributions to the people of the City of Columbus will continue to be felt for years to come.

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Local Restaurant & Local Bakery Team Up for the Greater Good http://www.columbusunderground.com/local-restaurant-local-bakery-team-up-for-the-greater-good-ls1 http://www.columbusunderground.com/local-restaurant-local-bakery-team-up-for-the-greater-good-ls1#respond Sat, 22 Oct 2016 13:00:54 +0000 http://www.columbusunderground.com/?p=1143845 Spurred by TheMetropreneur’s ASPIRE event in September, a partnership between local social enterprises Double Comfort and Food for Good Thought will connect the causes of employing individuals with Autism and feeding the city’s food insecure. Double Comfort owner Mary Lyski and Food for Good Thought co-owner Sarah Duplessis are in the business of helping the […]]]>

Spurred by TheMetropreneur’s ASPIRE event in September, a partnership between local social enterprises Double Comfort and Food for Good Thought will connect the causes of employing individuals with Autism and feeding the city’s food insecure.

Double Comfort owner Mary Lyski and Food for Good Thought co-owner Sarah Duplessis are in the business of helping the community. Double Comfort, a southern-inspired restaurant established in 2008, donates all of its profits to local and regional food pantries. Lyski calls it a win-win; people get good, comforting southern fare, and the money they use to pay for it comforts the chronically hungry with another meal.

Its purpose was to contribute to food security causes without setting up another food pantry begging for dollars from funders like Huntington Bank and The Foundation.

“I thought, ‘What if I just become the revenue stream?’ Lyski recalled. “I don’t want to reinvent the wheel. I don’t want to be another food pantry, but what if I can help the ones that are existing?”

Thus, Double Comfort was born. Every six months, Lyski cuts a check to a new pantry. As chosen by a 12-person charitable advisory board, the latest donation went to NNEMAP, on 5th Avenue, and was good for 84,000 meals. Their previous picks were the Clintonville CRC and Holy Rosary, on Ohio Avenue.

After learning about Food for Good Thought and the bakery’s mission to not only employ individuals with Autism, but act as a connective employment agency, Lyski asked Duplessis if she could get involved by selling Food for Good Thought’s pies at Double Comfort.

“As part of [the mission] we felt that we had to help, you know, all of the community that we can,” Lyski said. “And I loved hearing about what they’re doing, and their pies looked delicious. So I called them and had them come over and tried some.”

From there it stuck. Double Comfort’s dessert menu will feature Food for Good Thought’s apple pies. For the holiday season, when Lyski offers meals for four, a pecan pie will come with the turkey and traditional sides. Fortunately, or unfortunately, that means more business for Duplessis, who said orders have been pouring in ever since being named Social Enterprise of the Year at ASPIRE. Double Comfort was a finalist.

“Since winning the award, as well as all of the other things that have happened in the last couple of weeks, we are slammed,” said Duplessis while winding down with a bit of cake decorating. “I mean, it is crazy. It’s insane.”

Yeah, Columbus residents get excited about local businesses and local causes. Combining both, Duplessis’ surge in customers is only expected. The bakery, offering a gluten-free menu, was founded and is co-owned by Dr. Audrey Todd. Todd’s son, who is on the spectrum, inspired the cause while his diet, limited to gluten-free food, prompted the menu. But rather than being just a bakery who employs individuals with Autism, Duplessis said they wanted to find other jobs for people who don’t like baking or who have a mindset for completely different work.

“We have a client right now who has a masters degree in applied mathematics, and he would never fit into our bakery model,” Duplessis said. “So the reason we went more towards the employment agency side is because there are so many people with Autism that have so many different interests, and with our employment agency we are able to explore all of those interests and get them in a position that fits them.”

People looking for employment at Food for Good Thought will be redirected to government agencies, like the Department of Developmental Disabilities or Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities. Funding through those agencies means families of individuals’ with special needs won’t have to pay out of pocket for the bakery’s services.

Along with their services as an employment agency, Food for Good Thought also partners with Growlers, a local business using spent grains from breweries to make dog biscuits. And next fall they’re hoping to extend this new partnership with Double Comfort by starting an Americorps program.

For more information, visit www.foodforgoodthought.com and www.doublecomfortrestaurant.com.

Don’t forget to subscribe to Columbus Underground on YouTube for more Video Updates:

 

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Opinion: Paid Leave Is Good for Ohio Small Businesses http://www.columbusunderground.com/opinion-paid-leave-is-good-for-ohio-small-businesses http://www.columbusunderground.com/opinion-paid-leave-is-good-for-ohio-small-businesses#comments Tue, 18 Oct 2016 13:30:01 +0000 http://www.columbusunderground.com/?p=1143437 When you talk to business owners about what make their business successful, they often say their employees are their number one assets. That’s certainly true for the Columbus small business I co-own with my father, Wolf’s Ridge Brewing. We want to keep our employees happy, and for us, part of how we do that is […]]]>

When you talk to business owners about what make their business successful, they often say their employees are their number one assets. That’s certainly true for the Columbus small business I co-own with my father, Wolf’s Ridge Brewing. We want to keep our employees happy, and for us, part of how we do that is by offering paid family and medical leave. But paid leave isn’t just about treating our employees well – it’s also boosted our bottom line by increasing employee retention and morale. At the end of the day, people can do a better job focusing on work if they aren’t worried about what will happen if they become sick or injured. Stronger paid leave will spread these benefits across Ohio, which is why we’re committed to supporting a statewide paid leave policy.

When we started our business, we didn’t offer paid leave because we didn’t realize how important it would be to our employees. But during our first three years of business, we had two employees suffer from medical issues that forced them to take unpaid time off. We saw the toll this took on them and how it impacted our workplace morale. Since instituting paid leave, our employees are happier and more productive because they know they can stay home if they have an accident or become ill.

Unfortunately, we live in a state that doesn’t have paid leave policies in place, so we’re a bit of an anomaly in offering paid leave to our employees. While that provides us an advantage in employee productivity and retention, it also means some competitors who don’t provide paid leave can initially undercut us. Putting a paid leave policy in place would create a level playing field for businesses that want to offer paid leave by making the policy universal. Additionally, many proposed paid leave laws provide an extra benefit to businesses by creating insurance funds partially or fully funded by modest employee contributions. This means that businesses won’t have to foot the bill when employees need to stay home to recover from an illness or take care of a new child. For us, that means we could invest extra money in training or new jobs. For businesses that don’t offer paid leave already, this means they can start offering this benefit with minimal financial impact.

Our weak paid leave policies also hurt us because they make Ohio a less attractive place to work. When workers can simply head to neighboring states, like Illinois, for stronger paid leave policies, it means we’re losing out on talented workers –particularly in the food and beverage industry. That’s bad for our economy.

The business case for paid leave is clear, which is why it’s no surprise polling from Small Business Majority found nearly six in 10 small business owners support creating publicly-administered family and medical leave insurance pools funded entirely by modest employee payroll deductions, which could be used by employees to finance paid leave. Additionally, a plurality of small businesses – 45 percent compared to 41 percent – support publicly administered family and medical leave insurance pools paid with small payroll contributions by employees and employers.

Unfortunately, policymakers often hear more from special interest groups than real small business owners on this issue. That’s why we recently hosted a panel at Wolf’s Ridge Brewing small business owners and advocates to discuss the need for stronger paid leave policies in Ohio. Whether business owners thought a paid leave law would improve employee productivity or help level the playing field with big businesses, each panel participant effectively made their case for why paid leave is good for small businesses. This event was a valuable opportunity for policymakers to learn about why small business owners support these policies.

Paid leave is good for small businesses, but too many people hear the opposite from pundits. Policymakers need to listen to real small business owners on paid leave – not special interest groups. I’m spreading the word about why we need paid leave in Ohio, and I hope my fellow entrepreneurs do as well. It’s good for our families and our small businesses.

– Bob Szuter
Co-owner & founder of Wolf’s Ridge Brewing

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Shoppers Disagree on What it Means to “Buy Local” http://www.columbusunderground.com/shoppers-disagree-on-what-it-means-to-buy-local-ls1 http://www.columbusunderground.com/shoppers-disagree-on-what-it-means-to-buy-local-ls1#respond Tue, 13 Sep 2016 12:00:38 +0000 http://www.columbusunderground.com/?p=1138726 As fevered as people are about their love for Ohio and Columbus, a poll posted by Columbus Underground and related research revealed that many aren’t sure how to show their support for local businesses, or even what makes a business “local.” The survey asked readers what they look for when shopping locally and what criteria […]]]>

As fevered as people are about their love for Ohio and Columbus, a poll posted by Columbus Underground and related research revealed that many aren’t sure how to show their support for local businesses, or even what makes a business “local.”

The survey asked readers what they look for when shopping locally and what criteria a business needs to meet before they’re considered truly local.

shop-local-01Respondents generally agreed that if a business is owned by Columbusites and was founded here, it’s on its way to being local. But there were varying answers when it came to defining what percentage of the business’ products need to be locally sourced and also how many locations it should be limited to before it moves from “local” to “chain.”

Roughly half of those who answered said that if a business has more than five locations, it’s a chain — quite a high standard. Still, 90 percent said even if the business opens enough locations to be considered a chain, they aren’t likely to stop going. A quarter said it doesn’t matter how many locations there are as long as they’re all in Columbus or Central Ohio.

“We have three brick and mortars. We have a couple pop ups. We’re also inside music venues, and we have three trucks,” said Jason Biundo, Co-Founder and CCO for Mikey’s Late Night Slice. “We operate mainly local, but, I mean, the trucks go out of state for some events. It seems, to me, like picking a number is kind of arbitrary.”

In a way, it is. Chuck Lynd, Chair of the Support Our Local Economy Coalition (SOLE), said a business can have anywhere between six and 10 locations and still be considered local, but the main standard is that it’s locally owned.

“The survey clearly shows that the great majority of consumers want to buy local,” Lynd said. “The survey also documents the obstacles and really shows some confusion about what’s local and what’s not. It’s not surprising when you consider that the chains have been grabbing market share for decades.”

Lynd cited a national survey from 2011 that found Columbus to be one of the lowest ranking statistical metro areas (350 out of 363) when it came to the presence of local indie retailers in the market. Chains are hugely successful in the midwest and rust belt states, he said, with 65 percent of the market being controlled by national chains compared to the national average of 50 percent.

That means people in the midwest are more likely to come across a Chipotle when they’re hungry than a locally owned burrito shop. Unless people are making the conscious effort to seek out independent retailers, chains are chosen routinely out of convenience.

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This is reflected in another related research study that found that the small business share of the retail market in Columbus was under a quarter compared to the national average of 32 percent. The numbers get smaller away from the city’s core by about 10 to 15 percentage points.

SOLE’s own research determined that just a 10 percent shift from chain to local would keep over $300 million within the local economy and create 5,000 jobs in Franklin County.

So really, any locally owned business that contributes to the local economy can wipe their brow. They’re local. And as far as how much of what they sell should be locally sourced, the standards vary.

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About half of a restaurant’s goods should be from central Ohio compared to 5-10 percent for a retail store, Lynd said. And even though RDP, the food supplier for Mikey’s Late Night Slice, might not get all of its materials from central Ohio sources, RDP is owned and operated here, so they’re still contributing to the central Ohio economy.

Biundo puts it a little more eloquently:

“Our goal is that we want to be recognized, we want to grow, and the sky’s the limit,” he said. “There’s nothing wrong with that, and there’s nothing wrong with wanting to stay a small — like a one or two shop operation — and just do what you do.”

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Sneak Preview: Columbus Idea Foundry Expansion http://www.columbusunderground.com/sneak-preview-columbus-idea-foundry-expansion http://www.columbusunderground.com/sneak-preview-columbus-idea-foundry-expansion#respond Mon, 12 Sep 2016 12:00:43 +0000 http://www.columbusunderground.com/?p=1139310 After a year’s worth of work, the expansion of the Columbus Idea Foundry is approaching an end date. The entire second floor of the 60,000 square foot building at 421 West State Street is being reconstructed, retrofitting what was once a shoe factory into more maker space aimed at attracting creative office tenants, video game developers, […]]]>

After a year’s worth of work, the expansion of the Columbus Idea Foundry is approaching an end date. The entire second floor of the 60,000 square foot building at 421 West State Street is being reconstructed, retrofitting what was once a shoe factory into more maker space aimed at attracting creative office tenants, video game developers, tech startups, and a plethora of new community events.

Idea Foundry founder Alex Bandar recently provided Columbus Underground with a tour of the construction site, as well as a peek at the third level of the structure, which will house some cool lounge areas overlooking the second-floor event spaces as well as a rooftop deck with a skyline view. Bandar said that they’re hoping to have their second floor tenants ready to start moving in by January.

Check out photos from the tour, below.

READ MORE: An Open Letter to Columbus’ Creatives, Techies & Entrepreneurs (That is, to Columbus’ Makers)

To schedule a tour, email kris@ideafoundry.com.

For more information, visit www.columbusideafoundry.com.

Photos by Walker Evans.

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The Confluence Cast: Restaurateurs http://www.columbusunderground.com/the-confluence-cast-restaurateurs http://www.columbusunderground.com/the-confluence-cast-restaurateurs#respond Mon, 22 Aug 2016 20:39:29 +0000 http://www.columbusunderground.com/?p=1137380 What’s it like to own a restaurant and what drives people to do it? This week, we sat down with two restaurateurs with very different perspectives. First up, Sangeeta Lakhani, co-owner of The Table who speaks from her perspective on dealing with customers, employees, and the city. Then, an interview with Joe Deloss, founder and head fryer of Hot Chicken […]]]>

What’s it like to own a restaurant and what drives people to do it?

This week, we sat down with two restaurateurs with very different perspectives. First up, Sangeeta Lakhani, co-owner of The Table who speaks from her perspective on dealing with customers, employees, and the city. Then, an interview with Joe Deloss, founder and head fryer of Hot Chicken Takeover (currently the reigning Best Food Truck in Columbus) who talks a bit about chicken, but primarily focuses on his human resources model.

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