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Short North Closings and Openings

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Closings and Openings

The Short North Insider

Sadly, retail and galleries still seem to be moving or closing in the Short North.

Art Impressions at 714 N. High St. is closing, as is Cowtown Art at 668 N. High St. This added to the list of Curio A Go Go failing at it’s second location and Friday the 13th next to Little Brothers recently closing, although you can still get some of their items from Joel Treadway’s Cringe shop online.

Although, a little farther up the street at 1116 N. High St., What The Rock?! is taking a stab at a variety of different items based on musicians. Europia is now a full fledged state liquor store, while a Vino 100, a chain wine store, opened at 789 N. High St. Two new shoe stores, Shoe Classics at 765 N. High St., and Little Shop of Shoes at 664 N. High adds to the other shoe store, Legs Diamond already in the area. The Lamp Shade at 990 N. High St. also opened recently.

Next to the Shoe Classics spot is a Segway store, although I personally enjoy walking in the Short North, so I doubt they will be getting any business from me.

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89 Responses to Short North Closings and Openings

  1. whackamullet January 16, 2007 8:03 pm at 8:03 pm

    Referring to the Short North as a “gallery district” is a misnomer, and becoming even moreso with each new gallery closing. Sad but true. A town that doesn’t support the arts financially doesn’t even deserve to have a “gallery district.” Don’t get me wrong, I love the Short North for what it is, but calling it a “gallery district” is a far stretch.

  2. Walker Evans
    Walker January 16, 2007 10:03 pm at 10:03 pm

    I think the arty aspect of the Short North has peaked, and now that we’re seeing it becoming more commercialized it’s going to get “worse” for the artists before it gets better again. It’s part of the cycle for any neighborhood. We’ll probably see more new galleries, studios, and other art-related peoples setting up shop in cheaper and more bohemian-friendly areas like Olde Town East, Franklinton, and the King-Lincoln area.

    We’ll probably continue to see a rise there as far as stores and shops and things go, especially with many new housing developments under construction. Perhaps it wont be the plethora of locally-owned boutiques anymore, with a mix of chain-stores as well.

    And so the cycle continues.

  3. whackamullet January 16, 2007 10:34 pm at 10:34 pm

    Walker wrote I think the arty aspect of the Short North has peaked, and now that we’re seeing it becoming more commercialized it’s going to get “worse” for the artists before it gets better again. It’s part of the cycle for any neighborhood. We’ll probably see more new galleries, studios, and other art-related peoples setting up shop in cheaper and more bohemian-friendly areas like Olde Town East, Franklinton, and the King-Lincoln area.

    We’ll probably continue to see a rise there as far as stores and shops and things go, especially with many new housing developments under construction. Perhaps it wont be the plethora of locally-owned boutiques anymore, with a mix of chain-stores as well.

    And so the cycle continues.

    You’re absolutely right about this being cyclical. The most prominent examples of this are SoHo and Chelsea in NYC. Soon it will happen to Williamsburg there. Also, in Chicago it was the Wicker Park area. The writing was on the wall for Wicker Park when MTV Real World posted up there in, I think, 2001. The artists in the area defaced that house daily. :)

    I won’t get on my soap box, but city’s love how cool and interesting artists are and how they tend to gentrify areas. So, city officials offer them financial incentives to populate destitute areas, ostensibly to show their appreciation for the creative class. BUT, when the area becomes trendy and appealing at the hands of the artists, all the young professional hipsters want to live there, rents are jacked up accordingly, and the career artists are forced out. A disheartening cycle. :?

  4. art lyfe January 17, 2007 7:39 am at 7:39 am

    Walker wrote
    Closings and Openings

    The Short North Insider

    Sadly, retail and galleries still seem to be moving or closing in the Short North.

    Art Impressions at 714 N. High St. is closing, as is Cowtown Art at 668 N. High St. This added to the list of Curio A Go Go failing at it’s second location and Friday the 13th next to Little Brothers recently closing, although you can still get some of their items from Joel Treadway’s Cringe shop online.

    Although, a little farther up the street at 1116 N. High St., What The Rock?! is taking a stab at a variety of different items based on musicians. Europia is now a full fledged state liquor store, while a Vino 100, a chain wine store, opened at 789 N. High St. Two new shoe stores, Shoe Classics at 765 N. High St., and Little Shop of Shoes at 664 N. High adds to the other shoe store, Legs Diamond already in the area. The Lamp Shade at 990 N. High St. also opened recently.

    Next to the Shoe Classics spot is a Segway store, although I personally enjoy walking in the Short North, so I doubt they will be getting any business from me.

    READ MORE

    You would think that a publication aout the short north that is doing a story on the short north would at least investigate enough to give the stores the intended name. It’s not SHOE Classics people it’s SOLE classics. anybody up for a orbit smoothie and a trip to dr. major x. rofl

  5. Brewmaster
    Brewmaster January 17, 2007 7:53 am at 7:53 am

    whackamullet wrote BUT, when the area becomes trendy and appealing at the hands of the artists, all the young professional hipsters want to live there, rents are jacked up accordingly, and the career artists are forced out. A disheartening cycle. :?

    Lets not make them out to be such victims. I know plenty of people who made killings in the Short North and Vic Village through appreciation. In many cases, it wasn’t them not being able to afford living there, it was them not being able to turn down offers.

  6. Coremodels January 17, 2007 8:10 am at 8:10 am

    The other side of this too, some other areas are starting to see a boost in their art offerings…particularly the Exchange area of Main St.

  7. Walker Evans
    Walker January 17, 2007 9:31 am at 9:31 am

    art lyfe wrote You would think that a publication aout the short north that is doing a story on the short north would at least investigate enough to give the stores the intended name. It’s not SHOE Classics people it’s SOLE classics. anybody up for a orbit smoothie and a trip to dr. major x. rofl

    I dunno if you followed the link or not, but this came from a personal blog about the Short North, so it’s not really a professional publication. I’m not trying to excuse them from messing up names, but I know I’ve made my fair share of mistakes while typing on Columbus Underground. :lol:

  8. art lyfe January 17, 2007 9:47 am at 9:47 am

    whackamullet wrote Referring to the Short North as a “gallery district” is a misnomer, and becoming even moreso with each new gallery closing. Sad but true. A town that doesn’t support the arts financially doesn’t even deserve to have a “gallery district.” Don’t get me wrong, I love the Short North for what it is, but calling it a “gallery district” is a far stretch.

    Yeah I have to say I’m feeling this statement. The short is more like vanity shops that have a few squares of art up on the wall amungst a bunch of retail items.

  9. whackamullet January 17, 2007 9:54 am at 9:54 am

    Brewmaster wrote
    whackamullet wrote BUT, when the area becomes trendy and appealing at the hands of the artists, all the young professional hipsters want to live there, rents are jacked up accordingly, and the career artists are forced out. A disheartening cycle. :?

    Lets not make them out to be such victims. I know plenty of people who made killings in the Short North and Vic Village through appreciation. In many cases, it wasn’t them not being able to afford living there, it was them not being able to turn down offers.

    Please expand on this, if you don’t mind. Made killings through appreciation? Not being able to turn down offers?

    Coremodels wrote The other side of this too, some other areas are starting to see a boost in their art offerings…particularly the Exchange area of Main St..

    I don’t know about “art offerings”, but, yes, you’re right in that the Exchange is now trying to cater to artists, as are many parts of OTE….which is exactly my point. It’s cyclical! They’re given short-term incentive to populate destitute areas, which will quickly become revitalized and unaffordable for them. This isn’t some sort of conspiracy theory among artists. It’s a fact, with a wealth of case history to support it. Generally speaking, independent career artists can now no longer afford the ridiculous rents in the Short North, the so-called “gallery district,” so they’re forced to re-establish themselves in another area. Hell, the galleries themselves can no longer off-set the overhead in the Short North! In 5-10 years, you’ll see very few artists in Exchange and OTE areas. Next stop: Hilltop Arts District?

  10. Coremodels January 17, 2007 10:44 am at 10:44 am

    LOL…don’t know about Hilltop, but don’t be surprised if it is Westgate.

  11. Walker Evans
    Walker January 17, 2007 11:36 am at 11:36 am

    I doubt Westgate will become an “Arts District”. It’s too residential and doesn’t really have the building structure for art galleries to set up anywhere except maybe the commercial strips along Broad or Sullivant. It would take a lot of major change though as a lot of those buildings are the “set back” structure that people complain about with the few in the Short North (UDF, Swan Cleaners, etc).

    I’d say Franklinton has a very good chance of becoming a new artisit community. There’s some interesting buildings there, the area is still dirt cheap right now, and it’s proximity to downtown and other existing neighborhoods is more appealing for that type of setup than with Hilltop/Westgate that sits a little further out.

    I guess it all just depends on the artists. :wink:

  12. Likes Old Houses
    Likes Old Houses January 17, 2007 12:34 pm at 12:34 pm

    I think we will just see the galleries moving further north on High Street.

  13. whackamullet January 17, 2007 12:52 pm at 12:52 pm

    Walker wrote I doubt Westgate will become an “Arts District”. It’s too residential and doesn’t really have the building structure for art galleries to set up anywhere except maybe the commercial strips along Broad or Sullivant.

    I was j/k about Hilltop :wink:

    However, I’m interested to see what becomes of that stretch of Parsons with this upcoming revitalization.

  14. Walker Evans
    Walker January 17, 2007 12:57 pm at 12:57 pm

    Likes Old Houses wrote I think we will just see the galleries moving further north on High Street.

    True, some may head that way, but there’s only a limited amount of space between the commercialized central area of the Short North, and the commercialized south end of the Campus Gateway. And if that corner of the Weinland Park plan gets underway soon, it will make that gap even smaller.

  15. gramarye
    gramarye January 17, 2007 1:03 pm at 1:03 pm

    Brewmaster wrote Lets not make them out to be such victims. I know plenty of people who made killings in the Short North and Vic Village through appreciation. In many cases, it wasn’t them not being able to afford living there, it was them not being able to turn down offers.

    Only if they owned. If they were leasing their gallery space and renting an apartment, the increase in property values did nothing for them. The people who made out like lottery winners were the ones who bought the cruddy old houses in southern Victorian Village and Italian Village when people would practically pay you to take them off their hands.

    Coremodels wrote The other side of this too, some other areas are starting to see a boost in their art offerings…particularly the Exchange area of Main St.

    Indeed. As our resident Machiavellian big-picture utilitarian, I have to say that I consider this a good thing for the city even if it does make life tough for the artists. From the artists’ perspective, they’re being successively chased north in the Short North and then out of the district entirely, then likewise into Market Exchange, the Discovery District, King-Lincoln, Franklinton, wherever and in whatever order that happens to happen.

    From the city’s perspective, of course, all of a sudden that migration has left a trail of revitalization through four or five neighborhoods, where it would barely have affected one had the city began propping up the community in one specific location with tax dollars.

    Also, in fairness, the Short North has been heading upward since the early 90′s. That means that it’s been fifteen years, or thereabouts. Most people end up moving much more often than that. If the arts community enjoys a similar run in the Discovery District/Market Exchange area, that pegs the next exodus from there at 2020. That’s hardly destabilizingly rapid change.

  16. Brewmaster
    Brewmaster January 17, 2007 1:04 pm at 1:04 pm

    whackamullet wrote
    Brewmaster wrote
    whackamullet wrote BUT, when the area becomes trendy and appealing at the hands of the artists, all the young professional hipsters want to live there, rents are jacked up accordingly, and the career artists are forced out. A disheartening cycle. :?

    Lets not make them out to be such victims. I know plenty of people who made killings in the Short North and Vic Village through appreciation. In many cases, it wasn’t them not being able to afford living there, it was them not being able to turn down offers.

    Please expand on this, if you don’t mind. Made killings through appreciation? Not being able to turn down offers?

    15 years ago that area had more prostitutes and drug dealers than retail shops. People who invested in the area saw a huge appreciation in thier property values. Perhaps the word “offer” was too strong. Maybe it would’ve been more accurate to say that thier rising property values provided a huge incentive to sell.

    Perhaps there were a few artists who rented space that were priced out by landlords, but there had to be at least as many who benefitted than were victimized.

  17. Chris Sunami
    kitoba January 17, 2007 2:39 pm at 2:39 pm

    April and I have noticed this trend for a while now. It’s hardly worthwhile to go south of Buttles anymore if you’re looking for art and not commerce.

    But I can’t see any of this being a bad thing as long as the artists don’t abandon the inner city altogether. There are plenty of depressed neighborhoods that could benefit from the old artistic makeover.

    Not to mention the fact that there are a number of really interesting, meaningful or quirky galleries, restaurants and shops up near the north end of the Short North –just like there used to be further south…

    Of course, the best scenario would be if the artists would move down into downtown proper, and liven that place up a little…

  18. Coremodels January 17, 2007 3:06 pm at 3:06 pm

    OH yeah, make no mistake, growing up here when I was young the Short North was “the hood” filled with serious gangs like the Short North Posse, which was even the target of a multi jurisdictional task force that ended up putting out like 30 life sentences for racketeering.

    you just didn’t go there.

  19. Paul
    Paul January 17, 2007 3:14 pm at 3:14 pm

    What exactly is racketeering?

  20. Coremodels January 17, 2007 3:21 pm at 3:21 pm

    Basically it’s organized crime, or in this case an ongoing pattern of criminal activity that could be defined for RICO statutes, which is a broad kind of vague act that enables you to bust a guy for, say, selling a gram of coke…but turn it into a HUGE deal by connecting it to a pattern of crime and then handing down a life sentence.

  21. Columbusite January 17, 2007 4:02 pm at 4:02 pm

    Coremodels wrote The other side of this too, some other areas are starting to see a boost in their art offerings…particularly the Exchange area of Main St.

    Wait, you mean there’s a reason to go there now? Hopefully more than just one place there.

  22. whackamullet January 17, 2007 4:02 pm at 4:02 pm

    [quote=Perhaps there were a few artists who rented space that were priced out by landlords, but there had to be at least as many who benefitted than were victimized.

    The percentage of career artists who bought in the short north when it was dilapidated and “affordable” was exponentially less than those who rented. With all due respect, to say that there were at least as many who benefitted than were victimized (your term, not mine) is WAY off base. No more artists coming out of CCAD and OSU with ambitions to make art their careers could afford to buy then than now, no matter what area of Columbus. The reason the majority of the artists moved there in the first place was to benefit from RENT control as artists. It’s the same incentive program utilized by bigger (and some smaller, Bohemian) cities for decades. An artist-friend of mine is living in one of hundreds of such places in NYC right now. He had to prove, through past press coverage and letter of recommendation, that he was an active artist in order to be accepted. Many directly attribute this trend to the rise of SoHo, Chelsea, etc. Now, I’m not saying it’s right or wrong, that artists are “victims” or benefactors. I’m all about urban renewal. But, this trend is factual and very few of career artists have ever benefitted through calculated real estate investments in these dilapidated areas.

  23. dru
    dru January 17, 2007 7:33 pm at 7:33 pm

    For the record – Art on High and Cowtown were not so much galleries, as they were retailers. I think Art on High used to rotate its collection more 5-6 years ago, and Ctown did carry some original works, but by and large they were shops.

    The Short North still retains several galleries – Mahan, Roy G Biv, 853, Rebecca Ibel, Kathryn, Ohio Arts League, Sherrie, Kiaca, Studios on High, etc… that routinely rotate their art.

    There’s been some losses over the years that have saddened me – Acme, Hawk [although Sherrie is connected there], Blue Cube, the place that sold swords at the corner of 5th etc…. But it is also is the home to an increasing collection of public art. So to say it’s not an arts district based on the recent loss of 2 retailers is a little strong.

    Over the past 7-years the list of stores up and down the strip has changed dozens of times, and I wince a little with each closing. Lack of a business plan has hurt many, others tire of running a business on a tight margin, some grow old and retire, and some move away. But perhaps we should take some photos of it now, so in 2014 when a shop or restaurant closes, we’ll realize that the venture of making the SN a vital, urban neighborhood has continued on its steady path.

    Oh, and for the love of all, if you need some rock and roll items, go shop and support What the Rock – they seem like nice people trying to make a living doing something they love.

  24. Walker Evans
    Walker January 17, 2007 8:54 pm at 8:54 pm

    dru wrote Oh, and for the love of all, if you need some rock and roll items, go shop and support What the Rock – they seem like nice people trying to make a living doing something they love.

    I’ve walked by that place a few times. It’s pretty close to Surly Girl, right? I’ll have to try to stop in next time I’m near it when it’s actually open. ;)

  25. dru
    dru January 17, 2007 10:49 pm at 10:49 pm

    Walker wrote
    dru wrote Oh, and for the love of all, if you need some rock and roll items, go shop and support What the Rock – they seem like nice people trying to make a living doing something they love.

    I’ve walked by that place a few times. It’s pretty close to Surly Girl, right? I’ll have to try to stop in next time I’m near it when it’s actually open. ;)

    Just a couple of storefronts down. They have a small selection, but if anyone had friends with babies, they have some great punk, metal and reggae bibs. Overall they just seemed like nice people trying to have a fun business.

  26. desecration
    desecration January 18, 2007 8:42 pm at 8:42 pm

    Yeah-Heather and Mike, owners of What the Rock!? are really nice people! They have a good niche with the store and even carry a few items made by me :)

  27. placebohigh January 24, 2007 6:09 pm at 6:09 pm

    I saw Zetas the little greek restaurant right next to Waldos Hair Salon is also closing in the Short North too…:-( That place was soooo amazing.

  28. dru
    dru January 28, 2007 7:48 pm at 7:48 pm

    placebohigh wrote I saw Zetas the little greek restaurant right next to Waldos Hair Salon is also closing in the Short North too…:-( That place was soooo amazing.

    Apparently, one of the owners has been diagnised with a horrible case of lung cancer. I think it became impossible for the other to care for their loved one and run the restaurant. They are trying to sell it.

    Apparently, once can also by the Wells Landing store next to Union Station. I just saw a sign in their window as well.

  29. whackamullet March 2, 2007 9:02 am at 9:02 am

    “Bohemian Today, High-Rent Tomorrow” BusinessWeek.com

    Link: Bohemian Today, High-Rent Tomorrow.

    Maya Roney

    BusinessWeek.com

    February 26th, 2007

    Want to know where a great place to invest in real estate will be five or 10 years from now? Look at where artists are living now.

    Sociologists and policymakers have long been touting art and culture as the cure-all to economically depressed neighborhoods, cities, and regions. The reason? It has been proven that artists—defined as self-employed visual artists, actors, musicians, writers, etc.—can stimulate local economies in a number of ways.

    Artists are often an early sign of neighborhood gentrification. “Artists are the advance guard of what’s hip and cool,” says Bert Sperling, founder and president of Portland (Ore.)-based Sperling’s Best Places and compiler of BusinessWeek.com’s list of the Best Places for Artists in America… More: http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/feb2007/db20070226_149427.htm?chan=search

  30. gramarye
    gramarye March 2, 2007 9:53 am at 9:53 am

    And the best part about is that, since artists can’t afford to keep living there once the neighborhood gentrifies, they have to move on and start fixing up another neighborhood, so you gradually patch up your whole city instead of just one part! :)

  31. brandonphoto
    brandonphoto March 5, 2007 5:55 pm at 5:55 pm

    I’ll miss Cow Town, have bought a lot of cool stuff from there.

  32. The Hegemo
    The Hegemo March 14, 2007 12:27 pm at 12:27 pm

    Coming back from getting lunch today, I noticed that An Open Book has relocated up to the corner of High and Fifth.

    Also, Wells Landing does have a “Business for Sale” sign up. I hope they find a buyer and stay there, because that’s my go-to store for gift buying. I always find nice little items there.

    Cowtown has a “Final Sale” sign up now. I’ll miss that place, too. They had some nice stuff.

  33. rave_til_dawn April 2, 2007 10:08 am at 10:08 am

    Saw signs in the CowTown windows this morning announcing the arrival of a Bath & Body works in the April/May timeframe.

  34. Brewmaster
    Brewmaster April 2, 2007 10:16 am at 10:16 am

    rave_til_dawn wrote Saw signs in the CowTown windows this morning announcing the arrival of a Bath & Body works in the April/May timeframe.

    The Easton-ification of the Short North continues!

  35. Walker Evans
    Walker April 2, 2007 10:22 am at 10:22 am

    Wow. I’ve honestly wondered when we’d see one of the Limited Brands stores popping up in the Short North. I’m surprised it took this long. I would have thought a Bath & Body Works would have moved into the 670Cap the day that opened up.

    I wouldn’t be surprised to see smaller “boutique” versions of The Limited, Express, Victoria’s Secret, or one of their other, more specialty stores opening in the next few years.

  36. The Hegemo
    The Hegemo April 2, 2007 12:33 pm at 12:33 pm

    Brewmaster wrote
    rave_til_dawn wrote Saw signs in the CowTown windows this morning announcing the arrival of a Bath & Body works in the April/May timeframe.

    The Easton-ification of the Short North continues!

    Yeah, Starbucks coming in as well.

    I suppose we’ll see the south end of the Short North become increasingly chained, and more of the independent businesses will shift north…at least it seems like maybe that’s where things are headed.

  37. The Hegemo
    The Hegemo April 2, 2007 12:35 pm at 12:35 pm

    BTW, is there still a Bath & Body Works in City Center, or is that closed?

  38. Walker Evans
    Walker April 2, 2007 12:37 pm at 12:37 pm

    The Hegemo wrote BTW, is there still a Bath & Body Works in City Center, or is that closed?

    Pretty sure it’s still there. Most of the Limited Brands stores are still in there.

  39. Rachel April 2, 2007 12:44 pm at 12:44 pm

    rave_til_dawn wrote Saw signs in the CowTown windows this morning announcing the arrival of a Bath & Body works in the April/May timeframe.

    Ugg I’m so sick of Limited Brand stores, every corner you turn in Easton theres either a B&BW or VS it seems, it’s really annoying. I’m tired of seeing lingerie and lotion everywhere, let’s try something a little different.

    Yeah, Starbucks coming in as well.

    Starbucks isn’t so bad, it’s pricey, but I have to say their caramel frappacinos are to hard for me to resist.

  40. The Hegemo
    The Hegemo April 2, 2007 12:52 pm at 12:52 pm

    I think there’s already been a dust-up on the board (maybe even in this thread?) about the Short North Starbucks and I don’t want to start it again…but, I don’t mind Starbucks; I go there sometimes. It’s just that it’s a big chain that you can go to anywhere, as is Bath & Body Works, and the more places like that open in the Short North, the less the Short North feels like some place special or unique.

    Lennox Town Center is great, it serves a purpose and I shop there a lot, but it’s not a place that if I had friends coming in from out of town, I’d want to take them there to show off Columbus (except when my Canadian friends come to visit; they always want to go to Target because it’s not in Canada yet ;) ). The Short North is a place I like to take out of town guests, and I’m just hoping it’s not turning into Lennox with less parking…

  41. Walker Evans
    Walker April 2, 2007 1:59 pm at 1:59 pm

    The Hegemo wrote I think there’s already been a dust-up on the board (maybe even in this thread?) about the Short North Starbucks and I don’t want to start it again…but, I don’t mind Starbucks; I go there sometimes. It’s just that it’s a big chain that you can go to anywhere, as is Bath & Body Works, and the more places like that open in the Short North, the less the Short North feels like some place special or unique.

    I think a mix of national chains and independent companies will be ok for the area, as long as the balance isn’t shifted too much in favor of the chains. Those chains bring in a lot more visitors to the area, and have a much larger budget for advertising. Everyone in central Ohio will be made aware of the new B&BW store, and visitors to it will add foottraffic for other nearby local stores who may not have money to advertise at all.

    I’m not advocating a Short North Wal-Mart move in next week, but a few smaller versions of national chains that fit the neighborhood could be a big draw that would actually help the local shops and restaurants.

    I’d like to see more chains that don’t already have a presence in Central Ohio open up in the Short North, a la American Apparel. You don’t see too many people complaining about it.

  42. Anne Evans
    Anne April 2, 2007 2:05 pm at 2:05 pm

    I think it would be nicer if limited gave the new bbw a specialized & unique look JUST for the Short North. So if you were going to the “Short North BBW” it would be like you were going to a ‘new’ place.

    I do not want to see it with the same red-checkered awnings or whatever the newer stores look like.

  43. gramarye
    gramarye April 2, 2007 6:32 pm at 6:32 pm

    I also think that people need to acknowledge that not all chains are created equal. (Basically every chain was just one store somewhere at some point.) Sephora and White Castle are both chains, but they do project slightly different images.

    I’m partially surprised that the Limited didn’t decide to move into the Short North with its more upscale health & spa brand, C.O. Bigelow, rather than its more mainstream Bath & Body Works, which is more recognizable as a chain. Maybe they just didn’t want two in one city, even the Limited’s capital city, considering that there are only eight in the country, including the one at Easton. Nevertheless, I think that would have fit right in with the Short North milieu, chain or no chain (and nine would be a pretty small chain anyway). I’ve actually thought the Short North would be a good testing ground for some of the more niche brands of chain giants: brands in the nature of Limited’s C.O. Bigelow, Abercrombie’s Ruehl, etc., except ones that don’t already have a Columbus presence.

  44. vespamary
    vespamary April 6, 2007 3:20 pm at 3:20 pm

    Cowtown art is being replaced by Take 2 Apparel, the consignment shop that’s been over on Warren Street for the past several years. So at least THAT SPACE is safe from the Eastonification! Take 2 is a great alternative to the college kid leftovers available at Rag-O-Rama. But I think others have raved about it on other posts. I think the High Street location will be good for their visibility. And no BBW means Luxe de Vie will continue to have a fighting chance.

  45. desecration
    desecration April 13, 2007 11:44 am at 11:44 am

    Rivet at 1200 N. High St. will be coming soon. :D

    Details to follow.

  46. Brewmaster
    Brewmaster April 13, 2007 12:44 pm at 12:44 pm

    ^ Jeans?

  47. lifeliberty
    lifeliberty April 13, 2007 12:48 pm at 12:48 pm

    no, just rivets.

  48. Brewmaster
    Brewmaster April 13, 2007 1:10 pm at 1:10 pm

    Should fit in well with the Short North’s solid manufacturing base.

  49. desecration
    desecration April 13, 2007 1:34 pm at 1:34 pm

    Brewmaster wrote ^ Jeans?

    Absolutely not. I think others have covered that field. :)

  50. desecration
    desecration April 13, 2007 1:40 pm at 1:40 pm

    lifeliberty wrote no, just rivets.

    Nope… I will be saying more in about a week.

  51. Ndcent
    Ndcent April 13, 2007 1:42 pm at 1:42 pm

    The anticipation is ball blueing.

  52. brandonphoto
    brandonphoto April 13, 2007 7:36 pm at 7:36 pm

    Cool, hip hardware store??? HMMM???????

  53. The Hegemo
    The Hegemo May 6, 2007 5:15 pm at 5:15 pm

    Wells Landing is having their Going out of Business sale now. 20% off everything except for consignment items. They’ll be open until June 30.

  54. BUTerrier May 7, 2007 3:21 pm at 3:21 pm

    Walker wrote
    The Hegemo wrote I think there’s already been a dust-up on the board (maybe even in this thread?) about the Short North Starbucks and I don’t want to start it again…but, I don’t mind Starbucks; I go there sometimes. It’s just that it’s a big chain that you can go to anywhere, as is Bath & Body Works, and the more places like that open in the Short North, the less the Short North feels like some place special or unique.

    I think a mix of national chains and independent companies will be ok for the area, as long as the balance isn’t shifted too much in favor of the chains. Those chains bring in a lot more visitors to the area, and have a much larger budget for advertising. Everyone in central Ohio will be made aware of the new B&BW store, and visitors to it will add foottraffic for other nearby local stores who may not have money to advertise at all.

    I’m not advocating a Short North Wal-Mart move in next week, but a few smaller versions of national chains that fit the neighborhood could be a big draw that would actually help the local shops and restaurants.

    I’d like to see more chains that don’t already have a presence in Central Ohio open up in the Short North, a la American Apparel. You don’t see too many people complaining about it.

    I agree. I would like to see a Target maybe or Wal-mart that is very small, and built for the “urban” population. Maybe a space that is maybe double the size of Trader Joe’s in Dublin. This would definitely attract people from downtown, campus, all to that location in the Short North, and at the same time giving residents a place that they need for everday purchases.

  55. WildmanDan May 7, 2007 7:39 pm at 7:39 pm

    I’m not advocating a Short North Wal-Mart move in next week, but a few smaller versions of national chains that fit the neighborhood could be a big draw that would actually help the local shops and restaurants.

    I’d like to see more chains that don’t already have a presence in Central Ohio open up in the Short North, a la American Apparel. You don’t see too many people complaining about it.

    I agree. I would like to see a Target maybe or Wal-mart that is very small, and built for the “urban” population. Maybe a space that is maybe double the size of Trader Joe’s in Dublin. This would definitely attract people from downtown, campus, all to that location in the Short North, and at the same time giving residents a place that they need for everday purchases.

    Anything but that abomination that is Wal-Mart.

  56. Roland
    Roland May 7, 2007 8:48 pm at 8:48 pm

    Walmart can STAY OUT. Thank you very much.

    There really is no need for one. And who the hell makes “everyday puchases” at Target? These stores are full of cheap junk! There’s already a dollar store on High Street.

    I dont buy socks very often and thats about the only reason I ever walk into one those dumps. Really when it comes to everyday purchases, I can get everything I need from the local grocers.

    Now a hardware store, I’d love to see.

  57. BUTerrier May 7, 2007 9:04 pm at 9:04 pm

    I do my everyday shopping at Target. I would do my everyday shopping at Wal-mart if they were not, for the most part, in the Suburbs. Dollar stores are great, but they aren’t one stop shopping. While a few of you might be adamantly against Wal-mart I think it is fair to say the vast majority of Columbus loves Wal-mart and having a location in that neighborhood would definitely spur growth. I am not sure, but I have heard of “urban Wal-marts” that are built in urban areas of town, and are much smaller.

  58. The Hegemo
    The Hegemo May 7, 2007 10:26 pm at 10:26 pm

    There’s a Target just a couple miles away from the SN at Lennox; it has ample parking, is on the bus line, and within walking distance of the OSU campus. I don’t see what population is horribly underserved by that Target that there’s a need for one in the Short North. Honestly, given that I tend to buy a lot any time I go to Target (I swear, I could go in there for a pack of AA batteries and come out with a cartload of stuff…) I don’t see foregoing the convenience of the big parking lots at Lennox for a small store with limited on-street parking in the Short North.

    If we’re talking about drawing people into the neighborhood to shop from outside, I just don’t see who would go to the Short North for the same store that has a dozen other locations around town.

    (And I don’t shop at Wal-Mart and wouldn’t even if they built a store next door to me, so I’ll leave them aside for now)

  59. gramarye
    gramarye May 7, 2007 10:47 pm at 10:47 pm

    I do shop at Wal-Mart, but regardless, I don’t see either Wal-Mart or Target (or Costco or any other big-box retailer) setting up any kind of presence in the Short North anytime soon. That business model is simply too land-intensive (particularly with respect to the need for parking) for that kind of model to fit with that kind of neighborhood. The same could be said for City Center, which is where I think we’ve had this discussion before (the possibility of a Target or Wal-Mart filling in one of the vacant anchor spaces arose). People simply don’t do bulk shopping, or grocery shopping, anywhere there isn’t a flat parking lot. It would take both some good architectural engineering and some good marketing to convince even a small number of people to change that habit (making it somehow convenient and non-awkward to push carts through a parking garage), and I can’t blame the large-volume sellers for not wanting to take that chance. They haven’t moved in at the Easton Towne Center, either (they’re in the larger Easton area, on the periphery where more normal flat strip centers have been built). The same goes for Polaris.

    On the “urban Wal-Marts”: they definitely do exist, but even so, they take more land than is generally available even with several consolidated parcels in the Short North; they’d have to buy up close to an entire block, or at least half of one. Not likely.

  60. BUTerrier May 7, 2007 10:53 pm at 10:53 pm

    There is a Target at Lennox, but it is not exactly convenient. If I were to live downtown, I would live there because of the convenience it offers, not because of wanting to rebuild the city or any other altruistic reasons. I want to be able to walk to the store, walk to work, walk to dining, walk to a bar, I do not want to have take a bus or have to drive. Frankly, I wasn’t refering totally to the short north, as a target or walmart from the short north all the way to German village would be a great idea. If I am going to pay higher living expenses by living downtown I would like to forgo other expenses such as use of a car, and frankly right now public transportation is not at the level where I want to use it for much more than a ride up or down high street. If you want people to move downtown, you must give us a reason why, and without a place like wal-mart downtown it makes me not want to live there. When I lived in nyc I would do so much shopping at pathmark or Duane Reed and I hated it. They cost too much and do not offer enough. If I can live off of Bethel, and have a Wal mart and a meijer and whatever else all within a short drive with much lower living expenses, what is the point in moving downtown? I will still need to drive, my cost of living will be higher, and it seems like I get nothing out of it. Make living downtown better than living up here, and I would move there, until then I will stay here, and I know a large amount of people who feel the same.

  61. BUTerrier May 7, 2007 11:01 pm at 11:01 pm

    As far as the parking situation, Whole foods and trader joe’s have both dealt with this in larger cities. I have seen both of them in various urban areas, where they provide parking in a garage. I do believe parking is free, if they validate it, but I will not say this for sure, as I was only walking there, and never had a car. City Center would be perfect I believe for some type of big box given the already available parking. The parking is only 1 dollar for 3 hours as it is, I see no reason why a big box retailer could not subsidize this small cost.

  62. Roland
    Roland May 7, 2007 11:43 pm at 11:43 pm

    BUTerrier wrote If I can live off of Bethel, and have a Wal mart and a meijer and whatever else all within a short drive with much lower living expenses, what is the point in moving downtown?

    Is there anything more important then living near a Walmart. :roll:

    BUTerrier wrote …without a place like wal-mart downtown it makes me not want to live there.

    This reminds of me of the movie Idiocracy, where in the future people live inside Costco monstrosities.

    When you choose to live downtown, short north, GV, VV, etc, you give up the bigbox, but gain immediate access to BETTER things. Instead of driving to the city to get to the market or countless restaurants and entertainment locations, you then only need to drive out when you need something from home depot or walmart. If your shopping at a big box retailer, chances are your going to need a car anyway just to transport what your buying. Unless you’re just going to live inside Costco or something. lol

  63. honavery May 7, 2007 11:46 pm at 11:46 pm

    I want to be able to walk to the store, walk to work, walk to dining, walk to a bar

    I live 1 mile south of downtown and can do all these things. I’m not sure what your argument is (other than there aren’t enough Walmart’s in the city).

  64. vestanpance
    vestanpance May 8, 2007 8:35 am at 8:35 am

    I want to be able to walk to the store, walk to work, walk to dining, walk to a bar

    I too live about a mile (maybe 2) from downtown and can do all of this from my house in Harrison West.

  65. Walker Evans
    Walker May 8, 2007 9:15 am at 9:15 am

    For the record, I don’t think a Target would work in the Short North. I agree with Hegemo and Gram that the Lennox store would be too close for that, and parking is already a major issue in the Short North. I don’t think there’s room for even a small Target footprint anywhere on High Street through there, and I’m sure the development committees would be opposed to them knocking down buildings to make way for a new build.

    Roland wrote Who the hell makes “everyday puchases” at Target? These stores are full of cheap junk! There’s already a dollar store on High Street.

    Really when it comes to everyday purchases, I can get everything I need from the local grocers.

    Target has much higher quality stuff than a Dollar Store, and surprisingly a lot of items that are cheaper than what you can find at the grocery store. Certain things like pop are always more expensive, but other things like brand-name soup can be cheaper.

    And a Target would offer a lot more than what you can find in a grocery store (or anywhere else downtown for that matter). There’s pretty much no place to buy electronics or media downtown. If you want a dvd, an ipod, or a memory card for your digital camera, where do you go? If you want to pick up a new shower liner, or a new pair of socks, or a basketball where do you go? Where can you buy toys downtown?

    Some grocery stores do sell a few houshold goods, but they lack variety, and most times are more expensive because they are technically “convenience” items that they sell.

    I’d love to see unique home-grown stores that sell specialized items of these types downtown, and we do already have a few, but it’s wishful thinking to think we can just expect these types of things to magically show up when there’s nothing downtown to draw customers and foottraffic to them. A Target could serve those needs and also serve as that magnet to help other smaller local businesses thrive around it.

    I’d love to see a Target at the City Center as an “anchor” instead of a store like Macy’s or JCPenny’s. I think it could serve the demographics downtown on a much more regular basis. You may not need new socks from Target every day, but how often do you go into a Macy’s in comparison?

    Roland wrote Now a hardware store, I’d love to see.

    Downtown has a hardware store that’s locally owned. Go there! Short North doesn’t really need one.

  66. Ndcent
    Ndcent May 8, 2007 9:20 am at 9:20 am

    I <3 Target.

  67. The Hegemo
    The Hegemo May 8, 2007 9:32 am at 9:32 am

    My post last night was a little flip, so to expand (although other folks have already made a lot of the points I have in mind) –

    It really comes down to a cost/benefit analysis. Are the benefits of having Target/Wal-Mart/Whatever in the SN more than what it would cost to get them there?

    As gramarye already pointed out, even a store which is small by Target/WM standards would be essentially the largest parcel in the neighborhood. Land’s already not cheap there, taking up a block for a discount store just means less land/more expensive land for condos, small shops, etc. And there’s really not even a block down there anymore that is so currently underutilized that they could knock it down for a store. So the #1 cost is that the store would be taking up a large chunk of valuable real estate.

    I’d guess that any big box type retailer going into such a spot would need to greatly customize their standard layout, which means more costs to them. Plus, it’s no doubt a riskier environment than a typical strip mall. Which leads me to believe that to get them to locate in the SN, the city would need to offer incentives, tax abatements, etc. So that’s another potential cost.

    I could see the benefits outweighing the costs if:

    1) the new store is enough of an amenity to the neighborhood that people who would otherwise not consider living there would move there.

    2) the new store is a draw that causes people who live outside the neighborhood to come spend their money in the neighborhood.

    I just don’t see a SN Target/Wal-Mart succeeding at either of those. I get BUTerrier’s point that he doesn’t want to have to own a car and being able to walk to a store like that would be a big selling point. I wonder how many people in Columbus feel that way, though? I live in Victorian Village and have a car (which I have to have for my job, so there’s no getting around it). And honestly, everyone I know who lives in the area also has a car. So for most people, Lennox is already a convenient option. I could see popping into a SN Target to pick something up if I were already nearby, but if I were planning a shopping excursion at Target from home, I can honestly say that 9 out of 10 times, I would go to Lennox. So a Target in the SN would be no more of a draw in terms of living there than the Target at Lennox already is.

    And honestly, even with stores that aren’t already nearby: since I don’t personally go to Wal-Mart, I’ll use the example of stores I do like to patronize that aren’t convenient — say Meijer or Schottenstein’s — although I’d like to have them closer to where I live, I can’t say I’d be doing cartwheels if they announced their intention to build in the SN. I can be pretty much any place in Franklin County in 20 minutes from where I live now, so a monthly visit to Meijer or Schottenstein’s on a weekend isn’t that big a deal. Not enough that proximity to either store would make me change my mind about where I want to live. I’m a five minute drive from work, and that far outweighs being 20 minutes from Meijer’s.

    And on the second point, I don’t see anyone traveling from outside the neighborhood to go to a Target/Wal-mart/Meijer/whatever in the SN. Most suburbanites already live near one or all of those stores, so they wouldn’t represent something people would want to travel to the SN for. Which means they wouldn’t really add much to the neighborhood in terms of encouraging visitors to come spend money. That’s why City Center ultimately failed — because once Easton and Polaris and Tuttle opened, people could go to the same stores in a suburban mall with lots of free parking (I know parking is cheap at City Center, but it’s still not free) and without the real or perceived safety issues of downtown. I think you only really do well drawing people out of the suburbs and into the city when the city offers things that can’t be found in the suburbs. Which is what the SN does now — with Gallery Hop, the restaurants, the new clothing boutiques opening.

    I think urban big box stores work to a degree in cities with higher population density, better public transit, and fewer people who are used to always driving. I realize it’s a bit of a chicken and egg argument — although those things may be desirable in Columbus, we won’t have them until we make that lifestyle more feasible for people. But without those things, a big box discount store in the SN seems unlikely to be profitable either for the city or for the company.

    All that said, what are the plans for the Columbus Coated Fabrics site? That’s not right in the SN, but it’s nearby, and could potentially accommodate some big box retail on a brownfield site, a la Lennox or Rookwood in Cincy. And it could potentially be a boon for Weinland Park, which is more in need of new investment than the SN itself. Or have they already committed to residential development on that site?

    And if we are talking about chain stores we’d like to see in the SN, I’d love one of these:

    http://www.eq3.com/cat-eq3/process/locale/en_US/currency/en_US/page/index.html

  68. Walker Evans
    Walker May 8, 2007 10:11 am at 10:11 am

    The Hegemo wrote I don’t see anyone traveling from outside the neighborhood to go to a Target/Wal-mart/Meijer/whatever in the SN. Most suburbanites already live near one or all of those stores, so they wouldn’t represent something people would want to travel to the SN for.

    As Columbusite recently posted, there are 283,776 people living in the urban ring of neighborhoods, and as far as I’ve read, that number is still growing at a pretty rapid clip.

    I agree that a Target is a bad idea for the Short North for many reasons, but I think having one downtown could draw from this crowd of 280,000+ residents pretty well. Not to mention the thousands of extras who work, play, and go to school downtown.

  69. Roland
    Roland May 8, 2007 10:39 am at 10:39 am

    Walker wrote And a Target would offer a lot more than what you can find in a grocery store (or anywhere else downtown for that matter). There’s pretty much no place to buy electronics or media downtown. If you want a dvd, an ipod, or a memory card for your digital camera, where do you go? If you want to pick up a new shower liner, or a new pair of socks, or a basketball where do you go? Where can you buy toys downtown?

    For these kinds of things I will drive out to purchase. Usually heading over near the Lennox or Bethel or Sawmill. I dont often have the need though. Most of my shopping is for food and household things which are already convenient and frequent stops for me.

    Walker wrote Downtown has a hardware store that’s locally owned. Go there! Short North doesn’t really need one.

    Didnt know about this one. Thanks.

    Somethings gotta happen to City Center and maybe a Walmart would help those living downtown. Personally, I’ll still never need to shop there.

  70. Brewmaster
    Brewmaster May 8, 2007 10:44 am at 10:44 am

    The Hegemo wrote I think urban big box stores work to a degree in cities with higher population density, better public transit, and fewer people who are used to always driving.

    I think you’re right on here. The last time this city saw a sucessful big box store downtown was the Lazarus store. Back then, we had a huge population density, great mass transit with streetcars all converging downtown, and very few cars on the road. I’m not sure big boxes are a good thing for any downtown in today’s reality given their low density and heavy reliance on concentrated parking.

    If living 5 minutes away from the nearest Walmart is that high on someone’s priority list, they don’t really understand what living in an urban environment is about.

  71. Walker Evans
    Walker May 8, 2007 10:45 am at 10:45 am

    Roland wrote Personally, I’ll still never need to shop there.

    Personally, I never need to shop at the majority of the expensive clothing stores in the Short North, but I’m not opposed to those being there for the folks who do shop there.

    8)

  72. gramarye
    gramarye May 8, 2007 1:14 pm at 1:14 pm

    From the corner of Spring St. & High St. to the Target at Lennox is 3.3 mi. (about 8 min.) according to Google Maps. That’s hardly prohibitive. Those 3 miles make a real difference, too, because it’s just enough to get you out of the more expensive neighborhoods, meaning the land comes cheaper out there.

    Most people who shop at Target are not leaving with an amount of goods that they can carry comfortably (if at all). Even if you’ve got only four bags and can physically carry two in each hand, you’re not likely to be interested in walking 2+ miles to get back to your home carrying that. Talking about the pedestrian range to go to Target, therefore, is probably wide of the mark. Bars and restaurants are easy; you’re usually not carrying anything when you leave, and if you are, it’s a doggie box. The same applies to true convenience stores like UDF or any gas station mini-mart, generally. People go to Target for larger orders.

    On the issue of electronics and other big-ticket but low-weight items, however: I actually do most of my shopping for those online. My guess is that for goods that vary little (like electronics–not like clothing, which many will still want to try on, though I buy even that online), online shopping is going to become an increasing part of the commercial landscape. There’s no difference between an iPod you drove 5 miles each way to get at a Best Buy and one you spent 5 minutes buying off the Internet and had delivered to your door.

  73. Anne Evans
    Anne May 8, 2007 1:21 pm at 1:21 pm

    gramarye wrote There’s no difference between an iPod you drove 5 miles each way to get at a Best Buy and one you spent 5 minutes buying off the Internet and had delivered to your door.

    escaping sales tax?

  74. dru
    dru May 8, 2007 1:38 pm at 1:38 pm

    i have to admit, i don’t completely follow the track that this thread has taken. a target or a walmart in the SN? it seems to be a debate about whether “we” want such a thing, when the first issue seems to be that neither of these stores has such a concept in their business model. walmart has created more “urban” stores, but that has simply meant they’ve put in coffee kiosks and sushi bars into stores that are just as immense and surrounded by parking lots as their other stores. i cannot find any information about boutique targets either. but anyways, here is some food for fodder:

    1. Remember that a Wal-mart is slated for the project at Grandview and Dublin-Riverview. That would place it within 2-3 miles of downtown and the SN. At this point, you have both a Target and Wal-Mart w/i 3 miles of the proposed area. We walked to Target from the east side of the SN just this Sunday, it can be done on a nice day. The likelihood of them dropping one closer just seems implausible given the proximity.

    2. All buildings in the VV and IV have major code restrictions. Nobody is ripping anything down or radically reconfiguring anything w/o Commission approval. If I can’t glass brick my basement windows or change the trim color of my house, I think the chance of modifying property to fit the needs of a mega-retailer is slim.

    3. But having said that someone already mentioned the Columbus Coated Fabrics site (which right now is slated by Wagonbrenner for condos/apts) and don’t forget that the southern side of Jeffrey Place is zoned for commerical. So there’s some limited possibilities on the fringes, but I doubt either of these are what they have in mind.

    I know part of the point is discussion for the sake of producing ideas. But, this all reminds me a bit about the flurry of ideas and optimism for turing City Center into an IKEA, even though it completely ran against the business model of IKEA (outside of urban core, highway access, massive tract of land, seas of parking lots).

    What we need to focus on is indentifying those businesses that do go into denser urban areas and trying to attract them.

  75. The Hegemo
    The Hegemo May 8, 2007 1:47 pm at 1:47 pm

    Good points, dru. I think a Target is somewhat willing to modify their usual model in order to get an urban store in Chicago or New York or San Francisco, but probably would not alter their basic store design and business model to put a store in a mid-sized city like Columbus that is already well saturated in suburban and semi-suburban areas with their stores. I’d say that something like Lennox or Center of Cincinnati is about as “urban” as they’re likely to get in second-tier cities.

    Oh, btw, is Wal-mart back on for Dublin & Grandview? I’d heard about a year ago that was off…

  76. dru
    dru May 8, 2007 1:59 pm at 1:59 pm

    The Hegemo wrote

    Oh, btw, is Wal-mart back on for Dublin & Grandview? I’d heard about a year ago that was off…

    that i don’t know. the grandview city council has definitely taken some steps to make sure that the plaza blends into the neighborhood and isn’t just a concrete pad. While this makes fitting in a Wal-mart a little more difficult, I haven’t heard that the proposal has been completely scrapped. Especially since some of the property is in Cbus, not Grandview.

    there’s also still the remaining property around the new Time Warner building, which i’ve heard rumored to be awaiting a Home Depot. But that’s an extensive track of land reaching back into the old Big Bear Warehouses, so there’s plenty of space for a Wal-mart all around.

  77. BUTerrier May 8, 2007 3:47 pm at 3:47 pm

    I wasn’t meaning to say only a target or walmart in the short north. As I also stated anywhere downtown would be great, including city center. Put all of the conveniences I have on Bethel downtown, and I will move there. Until then it is more convenient for me to live out here. I am close to everything I use on a daily basis, from wal-mart, to whole foods, to the tailor, to restaurants. The only reason I go downtown is for nightlife, that alone is not going to get me to move there. Well, I do go to the farmer’s market for lunch sometimes, but that is maybe once every other month.

  78. Walker Evans
    Walker May 17, 2007 7:55 pm at 7:55 pm

  79. DawonHawkins
    DawonHawkins May 18, 2007 9:50 am at 9:50 am

    wow. very cool photos!

  80. gramarye
    gramarye May 19, 2007 3:49 pm at 3:49 pm

    Verrry niiiice … where are those?

  81. Walker Evans
    Walker May 20, 2007 5:13 pm at 5:13 pm

    I think they’re from Chicago and Minneapolis.

  82. desecration
    desecration May 22, 2007 4:15 pm at 4:15 pm

    As briefly mentioned before but now with many more details….

    Rivet will be opening on June 1st. Sorry to disappoint those who guessed it to be a designer jean store or a hardware store. :lol: Rivet is an art gallery and designer toy store. The art gallery will focus on underground, low brow, and pop surrealism art. If anyone attended the Operation: Fragmentation art exhibit in Dec.-Jan. then that is some reflection of what will be found here. I hope that you will take the time to stop by and see what it is all about.

    Address

    Rivet

    1200 N. High St.

    Columbus, OH 43201

    614-294-TOYS (8697) *The phone will not be answered until June 1st.

    Hours

    Tues.-Sat. Noon-7pm

    Sun. Noon-5pm

    (and by appointment)

    We will be open later for Gallery Hop on June 2nd.

    Thank You.

    Laura

  83. turbo ninja May 22, 2007 5:00 pm at 5:00 pm

    Do I understand this right? You’re going to sell designer vinyl toys?

    Or was there punctuation missing in there somewhere, and you’re going to sell designer products, vinyl and toys, like a developed Big Fun?

  84. desecration
    desecration May 22, 2007 5:45 pm at 5:45 pm

    They would be “designer toys”, though many are made from vinyl. Sorry for the confusion, I have edited the initial post.

  85. Jeffrey Collins
    Jeffrey Collins May 29, 2007 11:24 pm at 11:24 pm

    The kind of toys that Seen sells along with many other graf artists? The kind of stuff you can see on Hypebeast?

    I’m intreagued.

  86. desecration
    desecration May 30, 2007 11:14 am at 11:14 am

    Jeffrey Collins wrote The kind of toys that Seen sells along with many other graf artists? The kind of stuff you can see on Hypebeast?

    I’m intreagued.

    Yes. And if you also look at such magazines as Juxtapoz, the kind of toys that are featured there as well.

    Feel free to send me a PM if you have any questions.

    Thanks for the interest.

    Laura

  87. Walker Evans
    Walker June 1, 2007 2:46 pm at 2:46 pm

    In case anyone missed it: The newest store/gallery in the Short North:

  88. turbo ninja June 4, 2007 3:01 pm at 3:01 pm

    I didn’t look back through the archives to see if it was addressed already, but had Wells Landing always been so…gay?

    We stopped in during this last Hop to buy some wine glasses before the store closed for good and I can’t remember ever seeing as much “erotic male art” in there as I did on Saturday. Maybe they just break it out for the Gallery Hops?

    Bad Photoshop-filtered pictures, worse paintings – I can’t imagine why product lines like those weren’t able to keep the place afloat :roll:.

  89. ginger June 21, 2007 3:41 pm at 3:41 pm

    turbo ninja wrote like a developed Big Fun?

    i LOVE big fun!

    the photo booth in there is a relic.

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