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Macy’s Closing Tuttle Crossing & Eastland Mall Locations

Walker Evans Walker Evans Macy’s Closing Tuttle Crossing & Eastland Mall Locations
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Last fall, Macy’s announced that it would be closing around 100 stores in 2017. Local retail analysts told Columbus Underground at that point in time that this news could possibly affect local stores at The Mall at Tuttle Crossing and Eastland Mall.

Today, Macy’s confirmed that speculation as truth.

Both stores (one at Eastland and one at Tuttle) will be shuttered within the next several months as 68 stores across the US go dark. The Mall at Tuttle Crossing currently has two Macy’s anchors, and the second store will remain open. Clearance sales are expected to begin on Monday, January 9th and will last approximately eight to twelve weeks, placing the final store closure dates sometime in March or April.

“It is essential that we maintain a healthy portfolio of the right stores in the right places,” said Terry J. Lundgren, chairman and chief executive officer of Macy’s, Inc. “Our plan to close approximately 100 stores over the next few years is an important part of our strategy to help us right-size our physical footprint as we expand our digital reach. We are closing locations that are unproductive or are no longer robust shopping destinations due to changes in the local retail shopping landscape, as well as monetizing locations with highly valued real estate. These are never easy decisions, and we are committed to treating associates affected by these closings with respect and transparency.”

A total of 125 local employees will be affected by the closure of the two stores, and a combined 348,000 square feet of vacant anchor retail space will hit the two suburban shopping malls.

The only two other Ohio store closures include Macy’s locations in Sandusky and Steubenville.

Representatives at The Mall at Tuttle Crossing and Eastland Mall have been reached out to for comment, but have not responded as of the time of publishing.

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  • nohio

    Which one of the 2 Macy’s at Tuttle are they closing -the one they canabalized when Federated did the name switch to all Macy’s that was an old Kaufmann’s , all-junk all the time, or the regular Macy’s at the other end of the mall?

    • The release/info I saw doesn’t give an address (do they have different addresses?) and describe it thusly (if this helps):

      Mall at Tuttle Crossing (furniture/home/kids/men’s), Dublin, OH

      I’ve been to Tuttle just once in the past 10 years, and didn’t go in either Macy’s, so I’m not sure how to tell them apart.

    • AkronRonin

      My guess is the “Hayden Run” location–the former Marshall Fields/Kaufmann’s location. It’s always been the lower volume of the two locations, and it clearly shows. The one closer to 270 is far better positioned and substantially higher volume.

  • nohio

    Thanks Akron and Walker-
    The Dispatch chimed in and indicated it would be the Hayden Run (former MF/Kaufmann’s.) I feel for the folks that patronized the Eastland Mall location for decades-even though that mall has been on life-support for a very long time.

    • Responsibility1

      As a life long east side resident, I’m amazed that Eastland is still open. I haven’t allowed my wife to go there alone for the last 15 years.

  • TempoNick

    I’m sure they were probably sitting on the other store at Tuttle just to keep another anchor from moving in. (There are probably lease provisions that allow the mall to take back that space.)

    Eastland? No surprise.

  • Ron Newman

    Surprisingly, Eastland Mall was *not* one of the many Sears closings that were also announced today.

  • Dan Middleton

    I always thought it was bizarre Tuttle had two Macy’s.

    I remember going there circa 2010 after not having gone in that mall for years, coming in at one end by a Macy’s, walking to the other end, and finding myself standing in front of… another Macy’s… and briefly wondering if I was going insane.

    It was like the episode of Seinfeld where Kramer gets lost, realizes he’s at the corner of “1st and 1st” and concludes he must be “at the nexus of the universe” because “how can the same street intersect itself?”

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