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Learn Which Suburb Is Among The Best To Live

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WBNS-10TV wrote Learn Which Suburb Is Among The Best To Live

Jan 23 2008 6:52PM

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Hilliard is ranked as the most affordable suburb in Ohio, according to Business Week magazine.

Factors such as home prices, unemployment, crime rates and income helped push it to the top of the list, 10TV’s Kevin Landers reported.

With a population of around 25,000, median home prices of about $185,000 and a 15-minute commute to downtown Columbus, the magazine considers Hilliard an ideal place to live and run a business.

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43 Responses to Learn Which Suburb Is Among The Best To Live

  1. Columbusite January 23, 2008 10:44 pm at 10:44 pm

    Everyone knows Grandview and Bexley are the best followed by Upper Arlington and then Worthington.

  2. daniel
    daniel January 23, 2008 11:50 pm at 11:50 pm

    is there a term for something like

    urban

    tier 1 suburban

    tier 2 suburban

    exurb (i’m assuming that means extra-urban)

    and

    rural

    ?

    It has always seemed to me that any municipality in columbus that included the outerbelt was a suburb, I guess in this model it would be a tier 2 suburb.

    I’ve always felt that places like grandview, clintonville, franklinton and bexly were urban. but in this model they would be tier 1 suburban.

    the grey area for me would be places like italian village, urban or tier 1? whitehall, tier 1 or 2?

  3. MikeReed
    MikeReed January 24, 2008 12:01 am at 12:01 am

    Wow.

    Hilliard is the suburb of Columbus I would be least likely to ever live in.

    All of those place you mentioned Daniel are suburbs for our purposes.

    Exurban means it used to be urban but is no longer (tornado, flood, sinkhole, etc)

  4. Walker Evans
    Walker January 24, 2008 12:21 am at 12:21 am

    I actually lived in an apartment in Hilliard for a few months back around 1999-2000.

    It was god awful.

    Not that all of Hilliard is god awful… but where I lived was.

    I think a lot of potential lies in the small historic “downtown” area which the city officials have recently shown some interested in sprucing back up.

    Oh, and the Starliner Diner is alright too.

  5. gramarye
    gramarye January 24, 2008 1:02 am at 1:02 am

    Exurban means it used to be urban but is no longer (tornado, flood, sinkhole, etc)

    LOL

  6. daniel
    daniel January 24, 2008 1:16 am at 1:16 am

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exurb#Exurbs

  7. Paul
    Paul January 24, 2008 2:05 am at 2:05 am

    Walker wrote I actually lived in an apartment in Hilliard for a few months back around 1999-2000.

    It was god awful.

    Not that all of Hilliard is god awful… but where I lived was.

    Thanks for the good input! With well-rounded informative posts like that you should start a blog about Columbus living!

    Oh, wait… :P

  8. Paul
    Paul January 24, 2008 2:07 am at 2:07 am

    MikeReed wrote Hilliard is the suburb of Columbus I would be least likely to ever live in.

    Even after Grove City, Whitehall, and Reynoldsburg??

    You’ll have to explain this one to me.

    For people not familiar with Columbus, most of Hilliard if very nice, you can get a good home for the money, the schools are good, and it’s only about 10 minutes to downtown.

    I don’t understand all the dissing on it?

  9. gramarye
    gramarye January 24, 2008 2:47 am at 2:47 am

    The houses are very similar to one another … part of the reason they’re good deals is that they were effectively built in “bulk.” Not unlike buying in quantity in anything else.

    That said, I agree. They have outstanding schools and houses that are affordable to people who have children and who don’t have two white-collar working parents. I would much rather live in Hilliard than Groveport, Grove City, Urbancrest, Galloway, or Whitehall; I’d give it a slight edge on Reynoldsburg and Gahanna; and I’d actually personally rather live there than Westerville or Worthington.

    It’s also closer to the city than Powell or Lewis Center.

    It’s basically your stereotypical middle-income bedroom community. I think that’s partly why a lot of people don’t like it.

  10. swan January 24, 2008 7:39 am at 7:39 am

    i believe the correct answer to this thread is “none of the above.”

  11. Daz January 24, 2008 7:41 am at 7:41 am

    gramarye wrote

    It’s basically your stereotypical middle-income bedroom community. I think that’s partly why a lot of people don’t like it.

    Bingo.

    Hilliard wasn’t a “bad” place to live (save the traffic on Hilliard-Rome.. jesus), but it sure was boring.

  12. MikeReed
    MikeReed January 24, 2008 8:29 am at 8:29 am

    Paul wrote
    MikeReed wrote Hilliard is the suburb of Columbus I would be least likely to ever live in.

    Even after Grove City, Whitehall, and Reynoldsburg??

    You’ll have to explain this one to me.

    For people not familiar with Columbus, most of Hilliard if very nice, you can get a good home for the money, the schools are good, and it’s only about 10 minutes to downtown.

    I don’t understand all the dissing on it?

    I just don’t like the sound of the name. I’m sure those other places are more miserable for one reason or another. I just don’t like the sound of the name ‘Hilllard’.

    That’s a novel definition for exurbs from Wikipedia. I like my explanation better.

  13. Ndcent
    Ndcent January 24, 2008 8:49 am at 8:49 am

    What no Pickerington love? P-town represent!

  14. Walker Evans
    Walker January 24, 2008 9:19 am at 9:19 am

    Paul wrote Thanks for the good input!

    Thanks for the good response!

  15. enzo
    enzo January 24, 2008 9:29 am at 9:29 am

    Upper Arlington–schools are incredible

    Bexley-good schools

    Gahanna—it is the Herb Capital of Ohio!!!

  16. Walker Evans
    Walker January 24, 2008 10:17 am at 10:17 am

    Paul wrote Even after Grove City, Whitehall, and Reynoldsburg??

    Paul, could you please explain your unadulterated hatred for Grove City, Whitehall, and Reynoldsburg? Your lack of detail in posting is a constant disappointment.

    These are good affordable neighborhoods where red-blooded Americans can make a nice life for themselves.

    Why do you hate America?

  17. shroud
    shroud January 24, 2008 10:40 am at 10:40 am

    The vast majority of my friends have moved out into Hilliard proper, or very close to it (still within Columbus itself, or out beyond Hilliard into whatever that is out there).

    Most (but not all) work at OSU, so the commute time to campus was a big factor for some, as was the relative cost compared to some of the other suburban options. School district factored in for quite a few of them (those actually within Hilliard) too. The fact that others in our group were already in the area probably contributed for some as well, I’m sure.

  18. dnm January 24, 2008 10:54 am at 10:54 am

    I spent 22 years in Grove City and I can tell you its not a bad little town. The biggest concerns are the taxes, traffic and the lack of city-planning. $150,000 in Grove City will buy you a small newer home, or a larger home built in the 50′s-70′s. Theres alot of retail there now, but since Ive bought my own place, I know that my neighborhood now is better than where I lived. Ive lived here less than 6 months and I know everyone for at least 6-7 houses in any direction.

  19. wyliemac
    wyliemac January 24, 2008 11:32 am at 11:32 am

    MikeReed wrote

    I just don’t like the sound of the name. I’m sure those other places are more miserable for one reason or another. I just don’t like the sound of the name ‘Hilllard’.

    A friend of mine grew up in Hillard back in the 80′s. To this day, he refers to it as “Hilliards”. Cue banjos.

  20. Chris Sunami
    kitoba January 24, 2008 4:51 pm at 4:51 pm

    enzo wrote Upper Arlington–schools are incredible

    When I was growing up in Cbus, UA schools had a terrible reputation –not academically, but as filled with snobby, shallow, materialistic people.

    In all fairness, everyone I’ve met who went to UA has been a perfectly nice person. But many of those nice people have complained bitterly about how cliquish, wealth-obsessed and peer-pressure-y the environment was. I’ve even met people who didn’t want to let anyone know they graduated from UA because of how bad the school’s reputation is around town.

    UA also happens to be one of Cbus’ whitest suburbs. I’ve never been able to confirm this, but I’ve heard –frequently –that the city charter had language excluding blacks and Jews as late as the 1970′s. I’ve also heard that Bexley was created specifically because suburbs like UA would not allow Jews to settle there.

    Because of that, UA will never ever be on my list of acceptable places to live or raise a child.

  21. wyliemac
    wyliemac January 24, 2008 5:18 pm at 5:18 pm

    kitoba wrote UA also happens to be one of Cbus’ whitest suburbs. I’ve never been able to confirm this, but I’ve heard –frequently –that the city charter had language excluding blacks and Jews as late as the 1970′s.

    What?! You’re kidding right?

    While I agree UA is mighty white, I can’t see them having this in their charter as late as the 70′s. Maybe the 50′s.

    Nevertheless, I don’t think you should discriminate against a suburb based on hearsay, and dare I say a stereotype.

    • DontBlameMe March 23, 2014 3:49 pm at 3:49 pm

      My American History teacher actually told us that an African American doctor attemped to move to UA during the 70s, but there was a neighborhood fundraiser to buy the house. I believe the case went to court and the doctor lost.
      Also, UA would not agree to public transportation until the 1980s. They voted to keep public transportation out of UA because they did not want to connect UA to the more urban lower income working class areas of Columbus. I guess you could say that for many years UA has and probably will continue to make an effort to stay segregated.
      My father grew up in the Northland area and when Columbus public began to integrate he would have had to go to a highschool in east Columbus rather than Northland which was a couple blocks down the street. His family (and many others) then moved to the border of UA and Columbus. When I asked him if he would ever move back to UA he told me hell no not in a million years they are to snobby. This is coming from a man I consider to be a very arrogant person that fails to have any sympathy for the average working american. This clearly says a lot. This is just one example I don’t mean to speak for others not really trying to not UA either. Hope this clears a little information up.

  22. Cyclist January 24, 2008 5:24 pm at 5:24 pm

    Hillard’s old name was once Hilliards.

  23. ArtExchange January 24, 2008 7:05 pm at 7:05 pm

    I grew up in UA and loved it. Because of our schools I was able to take part in programs that sent me around the country and abroad. Most of my best friends I’ve known for over 20 years. And I had a loft and a bathtub full of pillows in every classroom in elementary school. I am appreciative of UA.

    That said, it is definitely mostly white, which obviously has a lot to do with this ever existing:

    “As was typical in many developing northern communities of the time, the Thompsons included restrictive covenants in their housing deeds that prevented African-Americans from purchasing homes in Upper Arlington (though the deeds were careful to point out that “colored servants” could still be employed). The covenants also prevented Jews from purchasing homes. The effects of this practice have carried through to the present demographics of Upper Arlington, still almost exclusively populated by whites.”

    Surely you can’t be saying that UA residents now hold the same views as those that settled the area?

  24. gpat January 24, 2008 7:11 pm at 7:11 pm

    Don’t hate on New Albany. WASPs unite!

  25. enzo
    enzo January 24, 2008 8:31 pm at 8:31 pm

    kitoba wrote
    enzo wrote Upper Arlington–schools are incredible

    When I was growing up in Cbus, UA schools had a terrible reputation –not academically, but as filled with snobby, shallow, materialistic people.

    In all fairness, everyone I’ve met who went to UA has been a perfectly nice person. But many of those nice people have complained bitterly about how cliquish, wealth-obsessed and peer-pressure-y the environment was. I’ve even met people who didn’t want to let anyone know they graduated from UA because of how bad the school’s reputation is around town.

    UA also happens to be one of Cbus’ whitest suburbs. I’ve never been able to confirm this, but I’ve heard –frequently –that the city charter had language excluding blacks and Jews as late as the 1970′s. I’ve also heard that Bexley was created specifically because suburbs like UA would not allow Jews to settle there.

    Because of that, UA will never ever be on my list of acceptable places to live or raise a child.

    My son was at St. Joseph’s Montessori which I regard as the absolute best school in the state. Unfortunately, my ex husband decided that he did not want to pay the tuition, so I moved to UA because thewhen I discovered they offer an informal learning program similar to the Montessori approach. As far as the exclusion of other folks, I would love to see the same diversity as the Montessori–perhaps with time. As a parentl, it is my responsibility to provide him with opportunities to learn about the entire world beyond the classroom. I am not worrying if the school meets demographic quotas or seems wonder bread white they take very good care of my child and have wonderful programs that I am very pleased with. UA has served us well. He is young, if it appears to be too homogenized as he gets older, I will take action. I would love to be able to send him to the Maharishi School in Iowa. I just don’t get hung up on all that at such a young age. The bulk of the responsibility for teaching children about the WORLD, compassion for all living creatures and universal conscience comes from the parents. UA is close to downtown which I like, it is clean, lots of sidewalks, great recycling programs, nice neighbors, parks, beautiful trees, WildOats, I like it. I love downtown and my ideal situation would be private school and living near the Montessori an BRISTOL :lol:

  26. ArtExchange January 24, 2008 10:01 pm at 10:01 pm

    as a product of that same informal program, i can tell you as an adult, i am so aware and thankful that i was allowed to have that style of education. it was magical when i was younger and i’d like to think helped me think outside of the box my entire life. it was a very encouraging way to grow up.

  27. MikeReed
    MikeReed January 24, 2008 10:41 pm at 10:41 pm

    I had the same conception of UA as mostly white and was informed that there was a large Asian and Indian population there.

  28. gramarye
    gramarye January 24, 2008 11:15 pm at 11:15 pm

    In terms of quality, UA was, at least for a long time, hands down the best public school in the area and one of the better ones in the state. The number of National Merit Finalists they produce was absolutely stratospheric even for their demographics (white, upper class, overwhelming majority of families with two college educated parents). The rise of the three Dublin high schools and now the wealthier areas beyond (Powell, Lewis Center) may have changed that, along with Columbus Alternative. However, back then, there was just one Dublin High School, and UA was still cleaning their clocks.

    If we’re talking about best value suburb for a middle-income family, however, you can buy a lot more house for your money in Hilliard and still send your kids to a high school that won’t really limit them much. Darby and Davidson are both very solid performers with lots of extracurriculars and good peer groups. Median home sales price in Hilliard last quarter was $177,500. Median sales price in UA was $267,500. Also, as some have mentioned in less flattering terms, the expense of maintaining the kind of lifestyle that some Upper Arlingtonians live is a little more than at either Hilliard school.

    At least, however, with UA, all signs are that you do at least get what you pay for. Not sure I can say the same about Dublin or New Albany, premium communities farther from the city center.

    Lifestyle-wise, there may be some knocks you could level against UA schools. In terms of academics, extracurriculars, and community support, however, they get gold stars running away. It’s a favorite neighborhood for Ohio State professors with school-age children, too, and I know part of that can be explained by how close UA is to OSU, but profs would live a little farther out if they thought it mattered. (They’re obviously not sending their kids to Columbus Public.)

  29. BCOZ January 25, 2008 8:02 am at 8:02 am

    At what point did the topic of this thread change to “What is the best public school system”?

    The decision of which school your kid attends is not exclusive towhere you live. Frankly, you could live in less-rural Columbus and send your kids to private school with the money you save in over-inflated house values and ridiculous property taxes.

    So…the best suburb in which to LIVE, IMO, is Grandview. Sure it’s a little expensive to buy a house/condo…but not due solely to the public schools amenities race (best example: New Albany) . It’s expensive (and IMO most desirable) due to:

    * Proximity to Downtown and OSU

    * low crime rate

    * trees and hills (!)

    * broad mix of traditional homes, condos and rental living

    * Quaitness of homes (no Dominion, M/I clone ‘hoods)

    * strong sense of community

    * non-chain shopping and restaurants

    FYI, I’ve lived in Columbus for 18 yrs and will not ever (likely) move. I work in the Grandview area and base my opinion on what I think others might find important..not just me.

  30. Walker Evans
    Walker January 25, 2008 8:15 am at 8:15 am

    BCOZ wrote Frankly, you could live in less-rural Columbus and send your kids to private school with the money you save in over-inflated house values and ridiculous property taxes.

    +1

  31. MikeReed
    MikeReed January 25, 2008 8:22 am at 8:22 am

    What does it mean to be “a good school”?

  32. gramarye
    gramarye January 25, 2008 8:30 am at 8:30 am

    Walker wrote
    BCOZ wrote Frankly, you could live in less-rural Columbus and send your kids to private school with the money you save in over-inflated house values and ridiculous property taxes.

    +1

    This depends, of course, on how many kids you have.

    Private school is upwards of $7000/yr, however. Most property tax bills come in nowhere near that, let alone the gap between the Grandview property tax bill and UA property tax bill on a similar house. (Plus, of course, you’re paying property taxes even if you send your kid to private school.)

    If you have three or more children, private school becomes one heck of a strain on your budget, whereas your property taxes don’t go up when your family size does (though, of course, you may need a bigger house).

    If I had to pick a Columbus suburb in which to live (forgetting means), Upper Arlington and Bexley would be my two top choices, and UA probably #1. Of course, if affordability enters the picture, right now I don’t think I could do much better than Reynoldsburg, assuming I want to be sure to have a 20% down payment on whatever I would buy. (This, of course, is why I’m *not* buying yet despite the down market!)

  33. MikeReed
    MikeReed January 25, 2008 8:31 am at 8:31 am

    You can do an 80-10-10 to avoid PMI if you don’t have 20% down. You just use a 10% line of credit toward your down payment.

  34. Walker Evans
    Walker January 25, 2008 8:59 am at 8:59 am

    gramarye wrote Private school is upwards of $7000/yr, however. Most property tax bills come in nowhere near that…

    He didn’t say to offset private schooling JUST with lowered taxes. Essentially if you’re paying less for a house, you can pay more for schools.

    MikeReed wrote You can do an 80-10-10 to avoid PMI if you don’t have 20% down. You just use a 10% line of credit toward your down payment.

    You can use the Community Access Mortgage (CAM) program available through Huntington to be able to put zero down, get a low fixed rate, and nix the PMI as well. It’s normally a low-income-based program, but Huntington has partnered with the city of Columbus to make it available for anyone looking to invest in targeted neighborhoods (King-Lincoln, Weinland Park, Franklinton, Merion Village).

  35. MikeReed
    MikeReed January 25, 2008 9:22 am at 9:22 am

    Walker wrote

    You can use the Community Access Mortgage (CAM) program available through Huntington to be able to put zero down, get a low fixed rate, and nix the PMI as well. It’s normally a low-income-based program, but Huntington has partnered with the city of Columbus to make it available for anyone looking to invest in targeted neighborhoods (King-Lincoln, Weinland Park, Franklinton, Merion Village).

    You’re telling me… that regardless of my income I can buy something in the KLD for zero down, a low fixed rate, and no PMI… NOW.

    Cause if that is the case I should start poking around more. Why not?

    The KLD is the next happening neighborhood in Columbus. Everyone knows that.

  36. gramarye
    gramarye January 25, 2008 9:45 am at 9:45 am

    Walker wrote
    gramarye wrote Private school is upwards of $7000/yr, however. Most property tax bills come in nowhere near that…

    He didn’t say to offset private schooling JUST with lowered taxes. Essentially if you’re paying less for a house, you can pay more for schools.

    Hmm. Fair point, but it would still have to be a lot less, especially if you’ve got several children, since you’d then be having to divide the decreased sale price by 13 years or more per child. If private school were $7000/yr, you’d have to pay $65,000 less for the house and save $2000/ye on property taxes … per child. For one child, that might be possible. Even for two, that could be questionable. For three or more, I’d say the odds are stacked against you, though of course, there are bargains out there.

    MikeReed wrote You can do an 80-10-10 to avoid PMI if you don’t have 20% down. You just use a 10% line of credit toward your down payment.

    You can use the Community Access Mortgage (CAM) program available through Huntington to be able to put zero down, get a low fixed rate, and nix the PMI as well. It’s normally a low-income-based program, but Huntington has partnered with the city of Columbus to make it available for anyone looking to invest in targeted neighborhoods (King-Lincoln, Weinland Park, Franklinton, Merion Village).

    Now that I did not know … that’s impressive! Might definitely have to take a look at that in ’09 if they’re still doing that.

    EDIT: I think it might say something about this little corner of cyberspace when you Google this: “Community Access Mortgage” Columbus … and CU (this thread, in fact) is at the top of the list.

  37. Walker Evans
    Walker January 25, 2008 10:09 am at 10:09 am

    gramarye wrote If private school were $7000/yr, you’d have to pay $65,000 less for the house and save $2000/ye on property taxes … per child.

    I’m talking about an offset, not a total 1:1 compensation. $7000/yr is a lot of money no matter which way you slice it. It’s just more affordable in your monthly budget if you opt for a $100k home instead of a $200k home.

    I think this is similar to Brewmaster’s argument that you can afford a more expensive home downtown (if you work downtown) that you could in the burbs because you’re shifting those extra thousands per year from your auto costs to your mortgage.

    gramarye wrote EDIT: I think it might say something about this little corner of cyberspace when you Google this: “Community Access Mortgage” Columbus … and CU (this thread, in fact) is at the top of the list.

    Sadly, it’s a program that Huntington doesn’t advertise much. We had to ask about it. And the only way we knew about it is because Dru mentioned it here awhile back, and there was a Dispatch article a year or two ago that mentioned it as well.

    This is why I wish there were some sort of resource online where any types of loans/grants/tax programs for homeownership in Columbus could all be found on one page. :? I guess I’m going to just have to stop wishing and start setting it up.

  38. MikeReed
    MikeReed January 25, 2008 10:12 am at 10:12 am

    Walker wrote

    This is why I wish there were some sort of resource online where any types of loans/grants/tax programs for homeownership in Columbus could all be found on one page. :? I guess I’m going to just have to stop wishing and start setting it up.

    Put it in The Human Calendar.

  39. Chris Sunami
    kitoba January 25, 2008 2:00 pm at 2:00 pm

    enzo wrote I am not worrying if the school meets demographic quotas or seems wonder bread white they take very good care of my child and have wonderful programs that I am very pleased with.

    Again, I freely admit my opinions of UA schools are second-hand. But I want to make it clear that my point is not merely a question of demographics –I know UA parents and children who characterize the schools as places where students cannot afford to jet off to foreign countries over spring break feel like second-class citizens –not because of anything the teachers or administrators are doing wrong, but because of the peer culture. I think factors like these are legitimate to take into account alongside academics.

    As far as my earlier comments about UA’s reputation in Cbus, however, I should be fair by noting that I graduated high school in 1993… things may have changed greatly since then.

  40. gramarye
    gramarye January 25, 2008 2:17 pm at 2:17 pm

    This is why I wish there were some sort of resource online where any types of loans/grants/tax programs for homeownership in Columbus could all be found on one page. icon_confused.gif I guess I’m going to just have to stop wishing and start setting it up.

    I think part of the problem is that these programs are always changing. I do like the idea of trying to come up with a site to collect (or link to) information on all of them, or as many as possible, anyway.

    Wiki format might be good. At least it would allow for a lot of updaters and fast updates … e.g., if a given partner bank’s page moves, or funding for a given program gets cut, or two smaller programs get consolidated. I remember trying to do a project like this hardcopy for student organizations at Ohio State (for all the various different organizations that gave grants for events or operating funds), but the problem was that by the time I finished writing anything, it was obsolete.

  41. gramarye
    gramarye February 1, 2008 11:37 am at 11:37 am

    Walker wrote
    MikeReed wrote You can do an 80-10-10 to avoid PMI if you don’t have 20% down. You just use a 10% line of credit toward your down payment.

    You can use the Community Access Mortgage (CAM) program available through Huntington to be able to put zero down, get a low fixed rate, and nix the PMI as well. It’s normally a low-income-based program, but Huntington has partnered with the city of Columbus to make it available for anyone looking to invest in targeted neighborhoods (King-Lincoln, Weinland Park, Franklinton, Merion Village).

    Bump for more info on this, FWIW: I talked with a Huntington banker online earlier today and she said that she didn’t know of any products like this being offered by Huntington in the Columbus/Franklin County area. Also, there’s almost no information about this at all on their Web site.

    Maybe the information is hidden somewhere in one of the city’s Web sites if it’s offered through Columbus and Huntington as a public-private partnership. Will look there next.

    EDIT: I did find this page from the Columbus Board of Realtors, though, and this page looks (at least superficially) current. Hmmmm.

  42. Walker Evans
    Walker February 1, 2008 11:50 am at 11:50 am

    gramarye wrote Bump for more info on this, FWIW: I talked with a Huntington banker online earlier today and she said that she didn’t know of any products like this being offered by Huntington in the Columbus/Franklin County area. Also, there’s almost no information about this at all on their Web site.

    Call the Short North or University Branch Offices locally and ask for Brian Connor. He came recommended to us and was very familiar with this program.

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