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Latitude 41 Recipe – Hot Chocolate & Marshmallows

Walker Evans Walker Evans
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21 Responses to Latitude 41 Recipe – Hot Chocolate & Marshmallows

  1. shmack
    shmack April 7, 2008 8:47 am at 8:47 am

    xanthum gum. yummy. :roll: this might be a good example of keeping the secrets in the kitchen. full disclosure not necessary.

    otherwise, coconut and spiced chocolate sounds delicious.

  2. Walker Evans
    Walker April 7, 2008 8:56 am at 8:56 am

    shmack wrote xanthum gum. yummy. :roll: this might be a good example of keeping the secrets in the kitchen.

    It may not sound like something tasty, but Molecular Gastronomy is HOT these days. ;)

    Check out some of the other recipe videos for all sorts of great tasty items. This one was more an example of technique.

  3. lisathewaitress
    lisathewaitress April 7, 2008 10:14 am at 10:14 am

    Walker wrote

    It may not sound like something tasty, but Molecular Gastronomy is HOT these days. ;)

    I can’t wait for it to be OUT.

    That being said, it doesn’t seem as though Latitude 41 uses a lot of chemicals in their food – they probably just use that so the choc won’t separate and look gross 10 minutes after being served.

  4. Walker Evans
    Walker April 7, 2008 10:25 am at 10:25 am

    Yeah, most of what they do is pretty much chemical-free, as you can see from the rest of the videos.

    I have to admit that I like some of the crazy techniques shown on Top Chef just to see some of the possibilities that can be achieved with a scientific approach to food. But the taste is always the most important thing. ;)

  5. desecration
    desecration April 7, 2008 12:01 pm at 12:01 pm

    That was interesting to watch. Walker, do you happen to know of any other local restaurants that use molecular gastronomy?

  6. joev
    joev April 7, 2008 12:08 pm at 12:08 pm

    lisathewaitress wrote
    Walker wrote

    It may not sound like something tasty, but Molecular Gastronomy is HOT these days. ;)

    I can’t wait for it to be OUT.

    That being said, it doesn’t seem as though Latitude 41 uses a lot of chemicals in their food – they probably just use that so the choc won’t separate and look gross 10 minutes after being served.

    Me too! I like honest food.

  7. Manatee
    Manatee April 7, 2008 12:10 pm at 12:10 pm

    lisathewaitress wrote
    Walker wrote

    It may not sound like something tasty, but Molecular Gastronomy is HOT these days. ;)

    I can’t wait for it to be OUT.

    +1000.

  8. Walker Evans
    Walker April 7, 2008 12:21 pm at 12:21 pm

    desecration wrote That was interesting to watch. Walker, do you happen to know of any other local restaurants that use molecular gastronomy?

    Hrm. Not off the top of my head, but I’m sure a lot of the fancier/modern places around town use these types of techniques, especially when making fancy desserts. Perhaps Mr. Hall can shed some light on this search?

    joev wrote Me too! I like honest food.

    Check out the rest of the video links then up top. They do a lot of good honest food. Mostly classic recipes with a few modern twists. They also get as many local and seasonal ingredients as possible from around the Central Ohio region. We even shot a few videos out at one of the farms where they get a lot of their produce.

  9. Brewmaster
    Brewmaster April 7, 2008 12:27 pm at 12:27 pm

    C’mon now people…how could you not want to eat a fake egg made out of coconut and carrot? Didn’t you ever play with your food when you were kids?

    http://soundbites.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/wd50_egg.jpg

    So what if it’s got a little agar agar or guar gum in it? Aren’t those “natural” too? :lol:

  10. joev
    joev April 7, 2008 12:28 pm at 12:28 pm

    Walker wrote
    desecration wrote That was interesting to watch. Walker, do you happen to know of any other local restaurants that use molecular gastronomy?

    Hrm. Not off the top of my head, but I’m sure a lot of the fancier/modern places around town use these types of techniques, especially when making fancy desserts. Perhaps Mr. Hall can shed some light on this search?

    joev wrote Me too! I like honest food.

    Check out the rest of the video links then up top. They do a lot of good honest food. Mostly classic recipes with a few modern twists. They also get as many local and seasonal ingredients as possible from around the Central Ohio region. We even shot a few videos out at one of the farms where they get a lot of their produce.

    Oh, I know – I really like what Latitude 41 is doing, especially with their local, seasonal ingredients. I was commenting on the trend of molecular gastronomy. If a restaurant is serving me something filled with chemical stabilizers and whatnot, they’re not doing their job. Those chemicals can stay in the processed food section of the grocery store, thank you.

  11. shmack
    shmack April 7, 2008 3:09 pm at 3:09 pm

    as a movement, molecular gastronomy has so much promise to poke fun at the hoity toity food snob. (me? no way.) i have to admit that i’m a fan. especially when it is done well. i had the tasting menu at WD-50 a couple years ago when Wylie Dufresne and Sam Mason were fresh on the scene and i had such a blast. i mean, how do you think i felt when i tasted nothing but a burger king whopper during the braised tongue + onion streudel + fried mayonaise course?

    but for the most part, molecular gastronomy and it’s applications are gratuitous. there’s a really good Chez Pim post about molecular gastronomy gone bad, right in elBulli’s backyard.

  12. Mercurius April 7, 2008 3:20 pm at 3:20 pm

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/chezpim/

    Yeah, I love that blog. Good read.

  13. lisathewaitress
    lisathewaitress April 7, 2008 3:46 pm at 3:46 pm

    Mercurius wrote http://www.flickr.com/photos/chezpim/

    Yeah, I love that blog. Good read.

    + 1

    I only wish I had her resources for flying around the world and eating at the best restaurants in the world.

    And I loved that post about MG gone bad. Especially where she goes into the library and sees the book with his bio underlined. Priceless chef hubris & ego, right there.

    Agar has been used forever in Japanese and other Asian cuisines, so for me it’s hard to see it as molecular gastronomy, because I’ve been eating agar-hardened desserts for a long time.

    Sometimes, though, you miss out – for instance, aspic, gelatin made from meat (protein), melts at body temperature, so if you have meat set in aspic, it will melt in your mouth. Agar, however (a vegan setting agent derived from seaweed), doesn’t melt – which makes it nice for shelf-stable products or hot preps – so it doesn’t have that same mouth-coating quality as a meat-based gelatin.

    I can see the fun of the carrot & coconut egg, and some other things, but most of the time I like to be able to identify my food.

    Also, additives interfere with flavor. Even cornstarch, one of the most basic of stabilizers, mutes flavors when added to anything. Unlike alcohol (and fat), which carries flavor. Which is why sauces made from meat, wine, and butter are delicious, and sauces made with cornstarch or potato starch, or soy lecithin or whatever are seriously lacking.

    just my humble opinion.

  14. TimFitz April 7, 2008 4:25 pm at 4:25 pm

    After seeing the hot chocolate was made with heavy cream, and then topped with coconut milk, you might as well garnish with bacon fat. Xantham gum takes a back seat to this “airy” dessert. Plus, it sounds like Walker added in some audio when the first whipped cream charger went in…come clean!

  15. lisathewaitress
    lisathewaitress April 7, 2008 7:47 pm at 7:47 pm

    not to nitpick, but it’s CO2 which goes into the cream whipping, not N2O. I’m sure the kitchen guys would be much happier if it were nitrous. . .

    And, just for anyone who would want to recreate this at home, you could make something very similar without the chemicals by:

    melt your chocolate over double boiler, dissolve your spices in a pinch of hot heavy cream and combine with the chocolate & allow to cool slightly.

    Whip your cream (equal to amt of choc used) in a stand mixer and gently fold it into the cooled chocolate, half at a time.

    you can get a foam with a cream whipper without using chemicals (other than the carbon dioxide charger), but it might not hold indefinately. You can also use gelatin or egg whites to creat the foam. You could also use a similar method as above – use a coconut cream like coco lopez and heavy cream. Whip your cream and gently fold in the coco lopez with no sugar.

    And to Tim – that is what it sounds like when the charger goes in. it’s also weird because the liquid inside the canister turns cold all at once; you can feel it on the outside.

  16. TimFitz April 7, 2008 8:12 pm at 8:12 pm

    Lisa, I’m down with the usage of the whipped cream charger. I’m just saying, listen to the sound when the first one is released, and then listen to the sound of the second one in the video, and I’m telling you Walker did some ProTools nonsense there.

  17. Walker Evans
    Walker April 7, 2008 10:01 pm at 10:01 pm

    TimFitz wrote Lisa, I’m down with the usage of the whipped cream charger. I’m just saying, listen to the sound when the first one is released, and then listen to the sound of the second one in the video, and I’m telling you Walker did some ProTools nonsense there.

    I may have used the audio from the other mic (two cameras, two mics) but I didn’t insert any sound effects in there. Why would I have? To make the charger sound more chargery? :lol:

  18. Walker Evans
    Walker April 7, 2008 10:06 pm at 10:06 pm

    I just re-watched to see what you were talking about and the second one did sound a lot quieter for some reason. There was a cut right after though too, so perhaps I cut it before the rest of the sound was there? Or perhaps the chef just turned the first one slower than the second so it came out slower?

    Either way, what a nice detail to focus on! :lol:

  19. Andrew Hall
    Andrew Hall April 7, 2008 10:46 pm at 10:46 pm

    There is no one in town doing molecular gastronomy.

    To provide a bit of context, Pim is the SO of David Kinch, the chef at Manresa. I consider Manresa to be the best restaurant in the country. David has a garden, is very focused on produce, ingredients and sourcing. He is not of the mad scientist persuasion, but is no stranger to molecular gastronomy either. If I recall correctly, both of them have had extremely positive experiences at Heston Blumenthal’s ‘The Fat Duck’ which is one of the epicentres of MG. I can also say I had a dinner w/ Pim and others at Manresa where it ended at about 2am with Chef coming out of the kitchen and saying ‘you win.’ One of the best meals ever. My feet are firmly in both camps. Pim’s is as well, in no small measure.

    When MG goes wrong, it goes horribly wrong. Alinea (Chicago) is another of the ultra-practioners of MG and I had the most horrid meal there and in the company of a table where everyone at the table had dined at El Bulli. It was just atrocious, despite the incredible talent of Grant Achatz and the level of ingredients he used. When it goes wrong, it really sticks in the memory far more than a typical meal. I would say that people are way more forgiving of bad meals in a traditional vein and use MG bad meals as ‘I told you so’ examples. To give Grant his props, three months later, I had a sublime meal there where everything clicked. Brilliant stuff.

    If I look at the ratio of successes to failures, I can easily say MG meals win out. I have had far more bad meals as a percentage at restaurants which emphasize ‘real’ food or ‘taste’ than at MG places.

    It is very easy to pick out MG dishes and make fun of them, especially removed from context and personal experience. And it is stupid. For example, Wylie’s egg. The basic flavor components are spiced carrot and coconut – a basic and yummy combo that was even on the menu in a soup in a very pedestrian restaurant I was in tonight. The dish is a fun play on that, designed as part of a multi-course meal. If you think of meals as ‘three and done,’ it will never be part of that. It works in a WD-50 meal as it both tastes really good and brings a smile to your face.

    A lot of it depends on how you look at food. If you accept food as an artistic medium, what Ferran, Grant, Heston or Wylie are doing is well in that tradition. A lot of people will be very (and publically and snottily) avant-garde in their art or music but act ultra-conservative when it comes to their gullet. Like minimalism or abstract representatialism, it takes a refined and incredible degree of skill to do it well. Where the cognesceti will rightly reject both the bad versions of these arts and those who ignorantly mock them, it is necessary to do the same with MG. A bad practitioner of MG does no more to discredit the movement than a bad painter or composer does to their respective genres.

    Without trying to be mean, I also have to say that unless you’ve had the food of these people, you simply are in no position to accurately comment. Seeing what someone does on TV or reading about it is no substitute for experiencing these dishes within the context the chef intends them. I think also that some of the dishes only make sense to or work with diners who have sufficient traditional dining experience to ‘get’ them – like certain visual or musical arts.

    I think the ideal is a balance. I recently had a meal with a brilliant chef who not only pulls out the chemistry set, but has his own farm and made butter and milled grits for our meal. Sublime in both taste and as a symphony to the intellect and the palate. Food that an 8 yr old laughed with and that he devoured. Food that two jaded palates revelled in, foodgasm’ed over and marvelled at. Food that chef’s eyes twinkled as he described the technical wizardry and when he showed his fire ant bite from the garden. You really can’t ask for anything more.

    I would also add that what cracks me up is that proponents of MG are not zealots or exclusionary – there is joy in both a traditional meal and a MG extravaganza. We are really happy people. OTOH, those who attack MG tend to be zealous in their reactionary attitudes as if MG is a threat and theirs is the One True Way. Silly. MG is a complement, an expansion and is both inspired by and gives back to traditional cuisines.

    In a totally off-the-wall way, I will paraphrase a quote which I think explains a lot. There was an interview with Spike Jones’ son where he said something to the effect of ‘People don’t get what a musical genius Dad was. You can’t just replace a G Sharp with a gunshot, it has to be a G Sharp gunshot.’

    A.

  20. shmack
    shmack April 7, 2008 11:00 pm at 11:00 pm

    Wow, Andrew, beautifully written. Thanks for posting such a wonderfully balanced commentary on one of the more recent trends in the long history of the culinary arts.

  21. Manatee
    Manatee April 8, 2008 2:21 pm at 2:21 pm

    That was great, Andrew. I really enjoy reading your writing.

    My thing with MG is that I hate fads. I mean, what’s Emeril up to lately? I hope nothing ’cause I never want to see that guy’s face again.

    I would love if a few techniques from MG were used occasionally to add another level of care to a great meal. I would hate if it was embraced as “the next big modern thing” in Columbus, cresting here just as the rest of the world tires of it.

    That’s all I guess.

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