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The Only Way to Give Columbus a True Identity

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This topic contains 345 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Gil Ligg 1 year, 10 months ago.

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  • #521793

    jbcmh81
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    InnerCore said:
    I don’t really see this a a grass is greener type of sentiment. I spent the first 25 years of my life living in Columbus before moving away 5 years ago. Before moving I always looked at it like Columbus was a great place to raise a family with a decent cost of living. While other cities had much more to offer in terms of culture, entertainment, etc. you had to sacrifice in terms of cost living, space, etc.

    Now that I have lived other places I realize Columbus has all the potential to be like other place it’s just the mentality of the people that hold it back. Columbus still doesn’t have any kind decent public transit other than buses for example.

    Columbus doesn’t need to be just like other cities but come one, when another city implements electricity and you can see the benefits you don’t refuse to use electricity out of fear of a grass is greener mentality.

    These posts always seem to contradict themselves. No city has everything, so there will always be people bitching about what it doesn’t have instead of what it does. That’s human nature, I guess. Throw in the claims that Columbus should both follow its own path and yet be like everywhere else just doesn’t seem to work logically. Does Columbus absolutely need better public transit? I want to see light rail as much as the next urban lover, but I’m not convinced that the city wouldn’t already have it if it was a necessity. You could blame the highway system, which is still easy to use and relatively light on traffic compared to many places which did get rail. Or you could blame the recent economic times which temporarily (because it will come back sooner or later) shelved plans for a rail/streetcar system. For whatever reason, circumstances just haven’t come together to force the issue. In time, they will, probably sooner than later.

    In any case, Columbus on its own merits is a great and improving city. Constructive critism is all well and good, but I’m not sure it’s going to come from people who compare it to NYC or who moved away to find greener pastures and are inherently biased against it to begin with.

    #521794

    jbcmh81
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    InnerCore said:
    My point is that you can’t improve things like say transit when the mentality of the people is that they don’t want to improve it. Take light rail for example. Columbus and Charlotte are almost identical in size in terms of MSA’s. Charlotte has the blue line and Columbus has nothing. The only reason Columbus doesn’t have anything better is because the people (majority) don’t want anything better.

    No, that’s just what you assume the problem to be, if there really is one.

    #521795

    lifeontwowheels
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    If there’s something I’ve really learned-and appreciate-about Columbus is that it’s incrediby easy to step up and build towards the image you want. The same energy spent letting preconceived ideas fester can be put towards amazing ends.

    I remember walking through 400 with Chris and some others before there was a 400. They were stringing electric cords from the small section that had electric to light the other parts. And look where that project has come in less than a decade.

    #521796
    lazyfish
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    ah jeez, it’s the yearly “identity crisis” discussion.

    Columbus is cool, it is chill and mellow, maybe we are a 5 or 6 for large metro areas. But looks only get you so far. We have personality, are friendly, caring, compassionate (usually). People who get to know us, like us. We may not be NYC, San Fran or LA, but we won’t love you and leave you either. Once you get over the initial shock of waking up here, you’ll see we are fun and a good time.Who cares what your big city friends think of us, grow a pair. Give us a chance, looks don’t last, but community will.

    ps have you seen what the big boys did to Austin, the place is a mess. All Dublin and Powell with the SN on steroids (not for improved athletic performance, more for vanity)

    #521797
    DavidF
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    All great cities have a significant number of people who hate said cities. By that standard, we are well on our way to world class!

    #521798

    Navin R Johnson
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    The constant talk about giving Columbus a true identity, has become it’s identity. Like it or not.

    #521799

    Rockmastermike
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    Navin R Johnson said:
    The constant talk about giving Columbus a true identity, has become it’s identity. Like it or not.

    ^^that^^

    #521800
    Manatee
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    Columbus, the Whatever You Want It to Be City.

    Plus I never thought about this until now, but I seem to remember being able to walk almost anywhere I wanted in Columbus, or take the #2 bus. It was pretty ridiculously easy. But I think as more and more people want to be able to easily reach the expanding suburbs without a car, rail will come. Pretty soon all of greater Columbutron will be one big interconnected shopping zone with people living around the edges. Give it 20 years. Maybe cool hip avant garde people won’t be writing articles about it right now, but you can’t stop people from buyin’ stuff when the cost of living here is so good.

    #521801

    lifeontwowheels
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    Manatee said:
    Columbus, the Whatever You Want It to Be City.

    Plus I never thought about this until now, but I seem to remember being able to walk almost anywhere I wanted in Columbus, or take the #2 bus. It was pretty ridiculously easy. But I think as more and more people want to be able to easily reach the expanding suburbs without a car, rail will come. Pretty soon all of greater Columbutron will be one big interconnected shopping zone with people living around the edges. Give it 20 years. Maybe cool hip avant garde people won’t be writing articles about it right now, but you can’t stop people from buyin’ stuff when the cost of living here is so good.

    I’ve got 3 buses within a 10 minute walk and can be downtown/SN in 20 minutes, dropped roughly at the front door of where I want to be.

    #521802

    InnerCore
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    Obviously people living in Columbus are going to defend Columbus, which is to be expected. I’m sure if I moved back after a couple of years I would be doing the same thing.

    But there seems to be a disconnect about what people who live in Columbus think it is and people who don’t live in Columbus think it is. Now you can cultivate all the local talent that you want but most great cities really need to have an influx of young creative professionals. And I don’t see these people moving here for a host of reasons and the perception of it’s identity is one of them.

    When I tell people I’m from Columbus the first thing I have to do is tell them it’s in Ohio. And soon as they here Ohio they think Buckeyes and cow town. Cities I’ve listed before like Denver, Charlotte, etc. are not much larger but they don’t have that identity or perception.

    #521803

    Rockmastermike
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    InnerCore said:
    When I tell people I’m from Columbus the first thing I have to do is tell them it’s in Ohio. And soon as they here Ohio they think Buckeyes and cow town. Cities I’ve listed before like Denver, Charlotte, etc. are not much larger but they don’t have that identity or perception.

    So what’s your point? A lot of us like it here and we like how the city has developed. If you don’t like that then that’s kind of your problem not ours. If you feel somehow that your sense of personal identity hinges on other people thinking that you live in a ‘cool’ place then I feel really sorry for you.

    The rest of us are just gonna keep being happy with where we live and doing what we think we need to do to make it even better, thank you very much.

    #521804

    lifeontwowheels
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    When I think of Denver, first thing I think of is the Broncos.

    Just to point out that that perception you and your circle have can easily be played back on the cities you mention. Austin? Hook ‘em Horns.

    Again it’s not so much the city’s image, it’s your projection and preconceived notions that can color how you view it. Cast that aside and explore and it may change. Our typical meetup spot amongst my closest friends has almost always been somewhere at Easton, being products of the suburbs growing up. Lately I’ve been dragging them down to SN and downtown favorites and have had a pretty good response.

    #521805

    lifeontwowheels
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    Rockmastermike said:
    So what’s your point? A lot of us like it here and we like how the city has developed. If you don’t like that then that’s kind of your problem not ours. If you feel somehow that your sense of personal identity hinges on other people thinking that you live in a ‘cool’ place then I feel really sorry for you.

    The rest of us are just gonna keep being happy with where we live and doing what we think we need to do to make it even better, thank you very much.

    Yeah, this

    #521806

    jbcmh81
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    InnerCore said:
    Obviously people living in Columbus are going to defend Columbus, which is to be expected. I’m sure if I moved back after a couple of years I would be doing the same thing.

    But there seems to be a disconnect about what people who live in Columbus think it is and people who don’t live in Columbus think it is. Now you can cultivate all the local talent that you want but most great cities really need to have an influx of young creative professionals. And I don’t see these people moving here for a host of reasons and the perception of it’s identity is one of them.

    When I tell people I’m from Columbus the first thing I have to do is tell them it’s in Ohio. And soon as they here Ohio they think Buckeyes and cow town. Cities I’ve listed before like Denver, Charlotte, etc. are not much larger but they don’t have that identity or perception.

    Funny, because everywhere I’ve ever been (or lived, for that matter) outside of Ohio and the US, people know Columbus. They’ve either done business there or know people who live there or have at least heard of it. There’s no question about where it is or which one it is. I’ve been constantly surprised by this. And if anything, Columbus suffers not from its own reputation, but for its location within Ohio, which for whatever reason seems to hold a worse view. But no, I’ve never once encountered a negative view of the city from outsiders… except on forums like this where people who didn’t like the city and moved away think they should be taken as objective sources as to what the city needs or is like. As much as you say that the people here are biased, so clearly, are you. No one is glossing over the problems related to Columbus. They’re debated and talked about here constantly. But not one uses those problems to bash the city or call it a backward cowtown like someone like yourself feels the need to do. I can only assume that this need arises from dissatisfaction in your own location or some desire to feel superior. Either way, it’s not constructive and it’s not particularly honest.

    #521807

    bob.os
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    lifeontwowheels said:
    Yeah, this

    Yup.

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