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"Slow Food on a Fast Food Budget" Potluck, March 13

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This topic contains 21 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by Bear Bear 3 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #85510
    Bear
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    Slow Food Columbus announces…

    “Slow Food on a Fast Food Budget” Potluck

    North Market Dispatch Kitchen

    59 Spruce Street, Columbus

    Sunday, March 13, 2–4 p.m.

    Free of charge

    One indicator of how messed up our food system has become is this: People with very little money now believe that having someone else prepare your food for you is less expensive than cooking it for yourself.

    We’re trying to rectify that. “Slow Food on a Fast Food Budget” is a kitchen primer that we have been developing to help people learn to cook better, cleaner, and fairer food for themselves, for less money than it would cost them to eat out. Our goal is to publish it in such a way that sales will fund additional copies that will be donated to local community centers, food banks, and charities.

    We’d like your help. We have some recipes for the book already, but we’d like more. If you think you have a recipe to contribute to the book, bring it, along with a completed recipe information sheet about the recipe itself, to our potluck on March 13 from 2-4 p.m. in the North Market Kitchen. The ideal recipe should:

    * be inexpensive and simple to make;

    * involve a small number of ingredients; and

    * be surprisingly good—if you were on the fence about whether or not to cook, this should be a recipe designed to convince you.

    Crucially, they should involve no pans other than a cast-iron skillet and/or a 6-quart Dutch oven, and no electrical equipment such as KitchenAids or Cuisinarts—though a blender is OK. (The very short set of equipment that we recommend for first-time cooks is included in this book excerpt.) You can come prepared to make or re-heat your food, but kitchen space is very limited. The recipes will be evaluated by a panel of people on limited budgets without advanced cooking skills—Ohio State University graduate students. Those recipes that best meet the above criteria will be included in the book, and everyone who contributes a candidate recipe will be thanked in the preface. The event is free; a quick RSVP would be appreciated, just to help us plan.

    #430909

    Twixlen
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    My problem is this – my brain is overrun with recipes!!

    I think I have just the one, though… it’s one of the first things I could make without consulting the printed version, which was the real turning point for me between cooking & not.

    #430910
    Lauren Wilson
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    I like this idea. I have three cheap and easy ideas…two would be a pain to assemble there and wouldn’t travel well, but I think my potato/broccoli/leek soup could hit the spot.

    #430911
    Roland
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    I have a decent kitchen but i don’t have a cast iron skillet OR a dutch oven!

    #430912
    joev
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    Yeah, what’s the deal with cast iron skillets and dutch ovens? Seems like a weird requirement.

    #430913
    Cats With Thumbs
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    joev wrote >>
    Yeah, what’s the deal with cast iron skillets and dutch ovens? Seems like a weird requirement.

    I agree…it sounds kind of like a “foodie” kind of thing to say, in this instance at least.

    I think a crock pot would be a good addition to the list of appliances…and it travels well too!!!

    #430914
    Lauren Wilson
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    It doesn’t sound “foodie” to me at all. Those were staple items in my grandma’s kitchen…passed from her mother and likely even older than that. They were people of very meager means, and their tastes in food were extremely simple…not “foodies” in the least. They’re recommended for people starting from scratch because they’re versatile, affordable, and incredibly durable. I love my cast iron skillet that I got for $19 and the dutch oven I’ve been eying is $30. That’s much cheaper than some of the cookware I’ve purchased that’s ended up being disposable crap.

    At least that’s what I’m guessing. :)

    But the recipe I’m thinking of will be made in a stock pot because that’s what I gots. :)

    #430915
    Lauren Wilson
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    But I agree that crock pots = rad.

    #430916

    KSquared
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    I have to agree with Lew. I think they were going with the most versatile and affordable cookware that would last the longest.

    #430917
    joev
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    If it’s rubbing people who actually have that equipment the wrong way, then maybe it’s something Slow Food should think about a bit more – that’s all I’m saying.

    #430918
    Bear
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    KSquared wrote >>
    I have to agree with Lew. I think they were going with the most versatile and affordable cookware that would last the longest.

    Bingo.

    #430919
    Cats With Thumbs
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    I guess I was thinking about college/broke days where the only the only cookware I was using was stuff handed down to me, or cheaply bought at the grocery store.

    The tools you guys are talking about totally make sense and I own them myself now (and agree with you on the “passed down from grandma” idea on cast iron skillets, etc)…I was just thinking about the cupboards of my friends who don’t cook, and what they have NOW, as opposed to what they could easily OBTAIN to get started (not that someone who doesn’t cook at all would own a crockpot either).

    #430920
    drew
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    joev wrote >>
    If it’s rubbing people who actually have that equipment the wrong way, then maybe it’s something Slow Food should think about a bit more – that’s all I’m saying.

    Those items were mentioned because we’re recommending them in the cookbook as the most inexpensive way to get quality, versatile equipment for those who may be putting together a set of kitchen tools from scratch.

    Nobody’s saying you have to have these exact things to use the cook book (or for that matter, to participate in the potluck) – for most purposes any stovetop pan will work fine – so if you have other equipment that serve the same purpose, then great.

    I’m not sure why these particular items trigger such a strong response, but really – if you look at the actual investment required and reasoning behind their selection, you’ll see it just isn’t warranted. The simple point is that these two pieces serve the largest number of functions well for the lowest cost. Many people have many more items (and often each cost more than what we’re recommending) in their kitchen that collectively don’t do anything more than what these two items do. We’re trying to avoid that.

    #430921

    Twixlen
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    Cats With Thumbs wrote >>
    I guess I was thinking about college/broke days where the only the only cookware I was using was stuff handed down to me, or cheaply bought at the grocery store.
    The tools you guys are talking about totally make sense and I own them myself now (and agree with you on the “passed down from grandma” idea on cast iron skillets, etc)…I was just thinking about the cupboards of my friends who don’t cook, and what they have NOW, as opposed to what they could easily OBTAIN to get started (not that someone who doesn’t cook at all would own a crockpot either).

    Not intending to speak for Bear, but my take on it is this – it needs to be a meal that can be thrown together in one pan; stove to table. For some folks, they already have that pan, are comfortable using it, etc, and it’s not a cast iron skillet or dutch oven.

    For a lot of folks, just starting out, thinking about outfitting a kitchen is overwhelming & so seemingly expensive that it seems more cost effective and certainly easier, to just grab a burger. I think the intent of the lists in the cookbook are to take away that intimidation factor, to let folks know it doesn’t have to cost a fortune to cook at home.

    Plus, there is the fact that if your only pan is an 8″ saute, you can’t exactly cook a meal that will provide some left overs for the week, which kills some of the cost effective, time-saving properties of cooking that one good pot of food for yourself.

    #430922
    cyclist II
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    I bought a 14 inch cast iron skillet at a yard sale for $1 a few ago. I asked the guy if he wanted more, but insisted on selling it at $1.
    When I was in college I attended many potlucks and cooked at home alot as I had a very ample kitchen that was well equiped with hand-me-downs too.

    I don’t think students are allowed to cook in the dorms other than with a microwave.

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