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Scioto Peninsula: Save the "HUB"

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This topic contains 30 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Darren G. 1 year, 8 months ago.

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  • #521365

    Rockmastermike
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    DavidF said:
    You should really put some mention of the singularity into your proposal.

    TIMECUBE

    #521366

    Darren G.
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    I wouldn’t miss out on a chance to bring in a discussion on the singularity principle if it applied to this situation. Perhaps you are referring to some of my other posts regarding the Ohio Foundational Mythology I’ve constructed by way of the Logos. Nice association DavidF, given those were posted about a year ago.

    #521367

    Darren G.
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    What is a smART COMPLEX?

    When in the course of brainstorming the universe a new idea actually comes along, it is often times necessary to develop a new descriptive vocabulary–symbolic term or icon–to try and define meaning for that idea. The phrase SMART COMPLEX is a very good example of this phenomenon. Consider how, just by looking at the smART COMPLEX declarative word tag, a person is able to gain an intuitive sense of what the “HUB” Stadium Superstructure is all about. This branding technique is all the rage in marketing and politics these days, although the concept behind it originally developed as a philosophical undertaking, the results of which led to structuralism, poststructuralism, postmodernism, deconstruction and other linguistically oriented analytic movements as a whole.

    Consider the single word complex. Webster describes complex as “a whole made up of dissimilar parts in intricate relationship.” Through a process of memory association, the word complex brings to my mind things like the military-industrial complex, the prison-industrial complex and the university complex. A derivation of this complex idea is the megaplex (a concept first developed in Columbus, Ohio… of all places). Taking into account its location as a varietal of the complex family, I would describe the role of a smART COMPLEX as being a hybridization of the university complex and the megaplex specifically designed to function as a provocative and proactive cultural measure to stem the growing tide of self-destructive social tendencies that feed into the less desirable–matricidal and infanticidal–military- and prison-industrial complex systems.

    To gain further insight into how a smART COMPLEX functions, however, some special attention needs to be given the “SMART” word proposition. Immediately apparent is the way in which the word ART is prominently displayed inside the word smART. This clever little syntactic device is very poignant if understood to be a descriptive metaphor of the relationship between creativity and intelligence, as well as a symbolic link to Columbus College of Art and Design’s 30-foot tall Art sculpture. People often lose sight of the fact that it is not how much one knows but how one can adapt what one knows to solve various problems of lateral thinking, thinking tangentially related to knowledge capacity, that distinguishes a person of great knowledge from a person of true genius. Yet the arts, which stress the creative application of both practical and learned knowledge, are consistently underappreciated; not by the status quo, mind you, but by the policy makers of the educated and political elite. Such negligible behavior begs the rhetorical question: How intelligent is our society when it’s being bled dry from a depreciating set of social values caused in part by its appreciable lack of art education?

    This paradox of perspective becomes more apparent when the two words “SMART” and “COMPLEX” are seen in tandem. Displayed as the phrase smART COMPLEX, the reference words ART and COMPLEX combine to create ART COMPLEX. Initially the idea of an ART COMPLEX is pretty self-evident: a building or group of buildings designed for the creation or viewing of art. However, if understood to be more a critical theory–a social-psychological (art) complex–instead of a physical (art) object, the expression is a double entendre that illustrates the psychoanalytic rationale behind society’s aversion to the arts. As it ironically turns out, Webster’s other definitions of the word complex are “a fixed idea or obsession” and “a persistent set of attitudes, having a decisive influence on the personality, and partly determined by unconscious motives.” This type of complex reading structured around the concept of art is very sociologically revealing.

    Simply, bluntly and rather crudely stated: People don’t like art because it gives them a complex, meaning it makes them feel dumb. And when people feel dumb they become defensive or timid. But the reason people feel dumb and intimidated around art is because most people haven’t learned the historical context or language related to art’s various domains of production. Yet, without an understanding of language or context, how can people be expected to fully appreciate art, much less wholly conceptualize its social function? As a consequence people tend to either neglect art, take it for granted or try to dismiss its significance in some disparaging way. The problem here is that when people as a whole don’t appreciate something, that thing, through a process gene-culture coevolution, becomes even more devalued and stigmatized within a given social structure. Thus, to the extent art is no longer viewed as being of primary importance, there is little to no outrage when it is absent from an increasingly sterile and inadequate educational system. Is it any surprise then that as art loses its cultural relevancy the perception of its social value becomes equally diminished? So, because people don’t like to feel dumb, and because people don’t like to feel as if they have been cheated out of something in life (i.e. neglected a proper education), and because people are generally afraid of that which they don’t understand, art has through the ages become increasingly isolated, segregated and alienated from the everyday life of a majority of the population. Unfortunately, once art has been removed from the ordinary lives of everyday people, art’s wonderful ability to empower folks–instead of make them feel inadequate–or bind a community together–instead of serve as just another divisive social-economic barrier–becomes all but lost to a very select and priviledged few (those who are the artist/practitioners along with the wealthy patrons who can afford to buy such unique and beautiful “luxury goods”). As a result of this anti-intellectual, anti-art trend culture as a whole has been lessoned and devalued as the masses gravitate towards cheap, trashy and fetishized pop-culture market consumerism to fill the desperate void created by an increasingly vulgar, spiritually challenged and materialistic society. Such is the vicious cycle of a socialized (art) complex.

    My “HUB” Stadium smART COMPLEX, however, is designed to change all that. How? By creating a single environment so unbelievably beautiful and vital it changes the way people look at and relate to art, changes the way people think and relate to their environment, and, greater still, changes the way people think and relate to each other: The ability to transform one’s perception of reality is the art of the alchemist’s medicinal stone.

    Ultimately the guiding principle behind this Columbus, Ohio, smART COMPLEX is to create an attraction so compelling and inviting that it functions like a giant cultural magnet, tickling people’s curiosity and attracting their attention, to the extent it brings folks in from all over the city, the county, the state, the country, et all, for the sole purpose of intellectual, aesthetic and social-recreational activities. Then, once drawn inside the “HUB” Stadium Superstructure, people won’t be able to help but become completely awed, mesmerized and enamored as they have a chance to explore history in a way that is more revealing, expand one’s creative interests and curiosities in a way that is more fulfilling, and do so in an environment devoid of vice-related worries. Such an experience would be more than memorable, it would be completely transformative.

    But the real judge of success for the “HUB” Stadium smART COMPLEX will be the level of inner satisfaction you’ll get knowing “I-I left the HUB Stadium smART PARK Superstructure Complex smarter than when I-I went in.” Such is the varietal nature of a hybridized smART COMPLEX. (At least that is what I venture to suggest!)

    #521368
    roy
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    Darren, you haven’t changed your shtick in more than fifteen years. You still equate capitalism with ‘cronyism,’ refuse to proofread for verbosity, or edit your many treatises to a manageable length. You continue to self-publish material intended to position your superiority, your genius, your brand of creativity above all others. In 2003 it seemed like youthful enthusiasm, but now you just seem crazy.

    Insulting others (“People don’t like art because it gives them a complex, meaning it makes them feel dumb.”) and unwillingness to adjust an approach that has failed for a decade and a half doesn’t build credibility. Instead of dismissing capitalism, consider exploring the concept of meritocracy and why your rigid worldview hasn’t won any supporters.

    #521369
    lazyfish
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    Yikes, what a terrible location, I won’t speak to the “idea” others can do that….can we please leave the greenspace alone.

    I got my metro parks magazine the other day and am blow away by how puny the Audubon center is compared with the other metroparks (which ain’t all that significant). The “development” site is heavily polluted, next to train tracks and is better served as greenspace.

    Driving thru downtown yesterday I was surprised how little green there is in the urban core, puny mangled street trees, postage stamp parks, seems our only green corridors are the scrub and poorly maintained highway berms….how sad.

    #521370
    Snarf
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    A decade old article from the Columbus Alive? Powerful stuff.

    #521371

    Darren G.
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    Darren, you haven’t changed your shtick in more than fifteen years…. do I know you? To what extent are you familiar with my work? You know what they say about assuming. It makes an ASS out of U and ME (ASS-U-ME, get it?)

    You still equate capitalism with ‘cronyism’… Ever heard of the Occupy Wall Street Movement? Don’t think I’m the only one. I suggest maybe you pick up a book on crony capitalism, there are plenty out there on the subject matter, unless of course you are the type of person who doesn’t like to challenge what it is you think you believe. Convenient escapist strategy for an apologist of the crony capitalist system.

    [you] refuse to proofread for verbosity… i do get carried away sometime. Can’t help it. I like big words. They stretch my imagination.

    or edit your many treatises to a manageable length…that’s a problem when dealing with a complexity theory. By definition, because a complexity theory deals with an entire system, it is an irreducible product. Because my work represents a type of complexity model they take time to write, time to read, and time to contemplate. That’s why repetition is so key.

    You continue to self-publish material intended to position your superiority, your genius, your brand of creativity above all others… not above all others, but certainly on par with many others. And assuming I have a brand of creativity, why should my ideas or my voice be silenced? That sort of goes against the whole principle of creative expression, doesn’t it? The question is, if i do have a brand of creativity (and i thank you for that high compliment; not an easy task to accomplish), and that brand speaks to the issue of trying to better this community by goading the Establishment into supporting a bigger and better arts infrastructure, why does that upset you? What sort of inferiority complex are you burdened by or what element of crony capitalism are you trying to protect? Funny how the mayor talks about Columbus’ need to show more swagger, but when a person like myself struts his stuff, he gets criticized for it. Basic cow-town BS when looked at that way and basically my point.

    In 2003 it seemed like youthful enthusiasm, but now you just seem crazy… it’s a fine line between crazy and inspiration. Anyone who ever made a difference in this world was labeled crazy at some point. I guess only time will tell which category of creator I fall under. The fact that half the people call me crazy and the other half call me brilliant should be a good indicator as to which I am. But the fact that this is even an issue should tell you something, if, that is, you know anything about the subject matter.

    Insulting others (“People don’t like art because it gives them a complex, meaning it makes them feel dumb.”)… Would you prefer ignorant? It’s a known fact people are intimidated by things they don’t understand. My point was this ontological deficiency is a cybernetics issue, which is a critique and judgment of our educational system. If you reread my position with a little more objectivity and a little less subjectivity you might not find yourself feeling so insulted – unless of course you feel defensive because deep down you feel dumb.

    and unwillingness to adjust an approach… always working on it

    that has failed for a decade and a half doesn’t build credibility… no, but it does give me enough material to publish my work in a book format. Once published, that will be the point at which my work will be judged along with the cultural image of Columbus. Better hope your analysis is spot on. For if experts find the work compelling and engaging, and hail it even moderately as some sort of breakthrough art piece, then this city is going to look like a bunch of chump ass bitches, especially the local “art media.” Gauging by my past history of either being hailed a madman or a visionary, I’m hoping this city decides to change its attitude towards the creation of a new “HUB” Stadium smART Complex. Best to hedge one’s bets.

    Instead of dismissing capitalism… I haven’t dismissed it at all. I just don’t think its the only game in town. When it pretends it is, or tries to shut out competition that threatens its power dynamic, that’s what I’m dismissive of. I suggest you read Peter Barnes’ book Capitalism 3.0 if you want a better context as to what the function of a Commons is and why monolithic ideologies are so destructive to the betterment of the good.

    consider exploring the concept of meritocracy… If we had a meritocracy I would be able to put my Scioto Peninsula/”HUB” Stadium concept to a public vote, with my ten plus years of work – which you acknowledge I have devoted to this project – the basis of my merit value. But since we don’t live in a meritocracy, and local politicians and media don’t seem to see much value in such the system either (wonder why?), then I suggest we shoot higher and seek a synocracy; since a meritocracy is only a transitional phase to a synocracy anyways.

    and why your rigid worldview hasn’t won any supporters… keep telling yourself that, my friend. Maybe one day you might become enlightened.

    Thank you for your input. I look forward to reading more of what you have to say.

    #521372

    Darren G.
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    A decade old article from the Columbus Alive? Powerful stuff… if you liked that article, here’s another.

    Why do all the cool kids leave town?

    Studies and stats only tell part of the story: Every young artist, musician and college grad who moves away takes with them a little part of what Columbus could be

    By J. Caleb Mozzocco

    If there’s an expert on leaving town, it may be Tim Easton. Easton, an alt-country singer/songwriter and former leader of Columbus Haynes Boys, grew up in Akron, spent some of his early years in Tokyo, then came to Columbus, like so many do, to go to college. Something of a wandering soul, he’s left town–repeatedly–and called California, Georgia and Europe home in the past.

    [[snip]]

    #521373

    cbustransit
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    yo–for someone trying to create a smart, well-designed art complex, you really need a new name. I get that there are a couple cool elements, but “the HUB stadium smART complex” is long. and doesn’t mean a whole lot to me. why is it a stadium?

    I’m thinking I’m getting your idea–something like a new-age art museum–but you really haven’t explained it well. Its new and innovative–how? there are no specifics despite the work at length. can i get an executive summary? lol

    good luck

    #521374

    Dubreuil
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    I would enjoy a new museum way more than state-of-the art apartments and condos that will, no doubt, turn into “the majority of what is downtown” now. I am only “joe public”, but the only reason I go downtown is for an event or an outing.
    As hard as everyone has tried to make it inviting to live there, I see nothing that would make me live there, let alone bring up a family there.
    No, I think that the majority of folks living in or near Columbus would love an arts complex or something similar. I do not think we have enough road warriors willing to live in the confined spaces of downtown. Let’s face it, there is no clean water, no mountians, no ocean, and at the best crappy weather year around. This is an unfortunate fact.

    #521375
    Snarf
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    I didn’t think you were allowed to cut/paste entire news articles, regardless of the fact no body cares.

    #521376
    JeepGirl
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    Snarf said:
    I didn’t think you were allowed to cut/paste entire news articles, regardless of the fact no body cares.

    Yup.

    My take on this guys writings:

    #521377

    Darren G.
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    For anyone who believes no relationship exists between traditional development models to crony capitalism, I redirect you to a recent three-part series in the New York Times that dealt with the issue of corporate welfare. The author of the series was then interviewed on NPR’s Fresh Air program. The TIFF incentive to develop the Scioto Peninsula is one type of corporate welfare that governments give to corporations – representing one model of crony capitalism. The timing of the article is yet another proof of the relevancy/timeliness of my “HUB” argument.

    Posted: December 5, 2012

    In her new series for The New York Times called “The United States of Subsidies,” investigative reporter Louise Story examines how states, counties and cities are giving up more than $80 billion each year in tax breaks and other financial incentives to lure companies or persuade them to stay put.

    The states and localities want jobs and economic growth; the companies want free land, free buildings, property tax abatement, “anything you can think of that would be financially beneficial,” Story tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross.

    The companies, she says, know they can get what they want, which is why they ask, and officials are so afraid to risk losing a current or prospective local employer that they readily comply.

    “The beneficiaries come from virtually every corner of the corporate world,” she writes in the series. However, the rewards from the incentives are difficult to calculate, Story writes, because job growth as related to incentive packages is rarely tracked.

    And yet, Story tells Gross, “I don’t think you’ll find a company out there that has not received financial incentives from local government.”

    As Dale Craymer, president of the Texas Taxpayers and Research Association, says to Story, the question is: “When does economic development end and corporate welfare begin?”

    [snipet]

    #521378

    Darren G.
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    yo–for someone trying to create a smart, well-designed art complex, you really need a new name

    …The “HUB” is just a generic name to indicate its role in the community as a central focal point. The stadium component is intended to imply scale and the type of WOW! factor that goes along with this type of cultural attraction. Other than that, my suggestion would be to hold a competition for naming rights, best name voted on by the public in an open public forum. This type of sight would be perfect for that kind of thing if the operators would be willing to organize it.

    #521379
    rus
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    Darren G. said:
    yo–for someone trying to create a smart, well-designed art complex, you really need a new name

    …The “HUB” is just a generic name to indicate its role in the community as a central focal point. The stadium component is intended to imply scale and the type of WOW! factor that goes along with this type of cultural attraction. Other than that, my suggestion would be to hold a competition for naming rights, best name voted on by the public in an open public forum. This type of sight would be perfect for that kind of thing if the operators would be willing to organize it.

    That could be hilarious.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/13/4chan-mountain-dew_n_1773076.html

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