Our City Online

Messageboard - Shopping

Is the era of the shopping mall over?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Shopping Is the era of the shopping mall over?

This topic contains 69 replies, has 31 voices, and was last updated by News News 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 70 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #480986

    ricospaz
    Participant
    Login to Send PM

    I liked City Center. Columbus screwed the pooch with that one. so much for downtown development

    #480987

    NerosNeptune
    Participant
    Login to Send PM

    christylwilliams said:
    I’m pretty sure that outdoor malls like Easton are still considered malls. I had assumed the no-new-malls-since-2006 statistic included those. But maybe not. The article doesn’t cite specific sources.

    I wonder how much life Tuttle has left in it. When I worked in Dublin through 05-06 I would go to the Panera for lunch, and it always had more mall-walkers than mall-shoppers.

    There are plenty of open air malls being built right now. One is about to be built in Cincinnati’s suburbs, there was a thread about it on here a couple weeks ago.

    And although it’s had tons of problems and still isn’t completed, stores began opening in 2008 at the closed-mall style Kenwood Towne Center, also outside Cincinnati.

    #480988
    Alex Silbajoris
    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant
    Login to Send PM

    NEOBuckeye said:

    I suspect that more and more retailers have come to look at the mall as being one more barrier between themselves and potential customers. When you know what you want, you don’t necessarily want to walk through an “experience” and dozens of push carts with pushy sales reps assaulting you with chintzy merchandise to get it.

    And you may not want to walk past 500 yards of SUVs and minivans in the lot before you get to the doors.

    #480989

    futureman
    Participant
    Login to Send PM

    NerosNeptune said:
    There are plenty of open air malls being built right now. One is about to be built in Cincinnati’s suburbs, there was a thread about it on here a couple weeks ago.

    And although it’s had tons of problems and still isn’t completed, stores began opening in 2008 at the closed-mall style Kenwood Towne Center, also outside Cincinnati.

    No doubt, they even removed the construction crane last May leaving a rusting 8 story building. http://cincinnati.com/blogs/northeastnotes/2011/05/31/kenwood-crane-coming-down/

    #480990
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster
    Login to Send PM

    christylwilliams said:
    I wonder how much life Tuttle has left in it.

    Average life expectancy of a traditional mall is maybe 20-25 years sans major renovations. Tuttle opened in 1997, so there’s a good chance it will close between 2017 and 2022. That gives it another 5 to 10 years if it’s not renovated soon. If Dublin pushes forward quickly with new mixed-use retail development then I expect that would be the nail in Tuttle’s coffin.

    MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/the-past-present-and-future-of-retail-in-columbus

    #480991

    jbcmh81
    Participant
    Login to Send PM

    ricospaz said:
    I liked City Center. Columbus screwed the pooch with that one. so much for downtown development

    Too much competition, terrible layout, no street presence, etc. City Center was doomed from the start, and honestly, the park seems to be doing a better job of attracting new development Downtown than CC ever did.

    #480992
    dru
    dru
    Participant
    Login to Send PM

    christylwilliams said:
    I’m pretty sure that outdoor malls like Easton are still considered malls. I had assumed the no-new-malls-since-2006 statistic included those. But maybe not. The article doesn’t cite specific sources.

    I wonder how much life Tuttle has left in it. When I worked in Dublin through 05-06 I would go to the Panera for lunch, and it always had more mall-walkers than mall-shoppers.

    the 2006 stat used is from the linked article in the New York Times -
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/06/business/making-over-the-mall-in-rough-economic-times.html?pagewanted=2&_r=2&sq=malls&st=cse&scp=2[/url]
    “…A new enclosed mall has not opened in the United States since 2006, according to Professor Dunham-Jones, and many ambitious projects, like New Jersey’s Xanadu just west of Manhattan, have lain half-finished for years.” (emphasis mine)

    So it appears to be traditional malls. Of course this still leaves the question of it Lifestyle Centers with enclosed portions, like those at Easton, would qualify in the stat.

    #480993
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster
    Login to Send PM

    ricospaz said:
    I liked City Center.

    I thought it was an ok mall. But unfortunately, we were in the minority, which meant fewer customers, fewer stores, and eventual closing. The City of Columbus couldn’t have reversed that. A private developer is needed to renovate or rebuild, and it sounds like there were no takers for renovating that bunker.

    #480994
    stephentszuter
    stephentszuter
    Participant
    Login to Send PM

    I’m glad City Center died. We don’t need a suburban mall in the middle of the city. We need mixed use buildings to comprise a shopping center or district. I still wish some of the bigger names would start to move back downtown. I wouldn’t be too opposed to seeing a Chicago Water Tower-type mall in Columbus, or even a Michigan Avenue-style shopping district. But since things are changing in Columbus, and things are moving back to the center, we have a lot of room to start from scratch.

    Personally, I’m excited to hear that the last mall was built in 2006. It is proof of a trend reversal (although, how often are malls built?)

    #480995
    Porky
    Porky
    Participant
    Login to Send PM

    This got me to wondering about the oldest malls in America and apparently one of the earliest was right here:
    The early shopping center in the United States took shape at the Grandview Avenue Shopping Center (the “Bank Block”) in Grandview Heights, Ohio in 1928, the first regional shopping center in America that integrated parking into the design. This general plan by Don Monroe Casto Sr. became the prototype of shopping centers for several decades.

    #480996

    James
    Participant
    Login to Send PM

    Porky said:
    This got me to wondering about the oldest malls in America and apparently one of the earliest was right here:
    The early shopping center in the United States took shape at the Grandview Avenue Shopping Center (the “Bank Block”) in Grandview Heights, Ohio in 1928, the first regional shopping center in America that integrated parking into the design. This general plan by Don Monroe Casto Sr. became the prototype of shopping centers for several decades.

    Even earlier than that, before cars & parking, was the Cleveland Arcade:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleveland_arcade

    And it’s outlasted indoor malls built 100 years after it.

    #480997

    budser1228
    Participant
    Login to Send PM

    City Center wasn’t allowed by the City of Columbus to get or give any information from a developer near the end.

    I personally saw a developer’s mixed use rendering of what City Center could be turned into but Simon Property Group told the developer that it could not talk to him per the City of Columbus (this was back in 2007-08). I don’t have the specifics of why Simon wasn’t allowed to speak with developers – whether it was the lawsuit by the City against Simon about how they neglected the property, the fact that they leased the land from the City, or if was from a bankruptcy with the City of Columbus being a creditor. Whatever it was, the City then made an agreement with Simon and bought/took control of City Center.

    So, it wasn’t that no one saw the potential, it was that it was too late and the City took control and decided to do what they wanted to do.

    #480998

    christylwilliams
    Participant
    Login to Send PM

    Walker said:
    Average life expectancy of a traditional mall is maybe 20-25 years sans major renovations.

    Talk about planned obsolescence.

    I agree with the original article that just bulldozing these old malls seems like a big waste of valuable infrastructure.

    I miss City Center a lot. With some renovation and re-purposing, it really could’ve been a kick ass mixed-use development. Like its own little neighborhood in the heart of the city.

    #480999

    mrpoppinzs
    Member
    Login to Send PM

    It would have been really cool to have some large scale retail downtown like when City Center was doing well. By the time I got to the AD it was pretty vacant and they were about to tear it down. I still hope that some larger retailers eventually make it back down there. I imagine it would have been pretty great to walk to that much retail downtown.

    This was a Meleca architectural proposal for a revamp:

    #481000
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster
    Login to Send PM

    christylwilliams said:
    I miss City Center a lot. With some renovation and re-purposing, it really could’ve been a kick ass mixed-use development. Like its own little neighborhood in the heart of the city.

    I agree!

    http://www.walkerevanseffect.com/blog/my-city-center-wishlist-a-12-step-program-for-recovery/

    Unfortunately, no one with money was interested at the time.

    I think the park is an adequate temporary use for the space, and eventually we might get that dense mixed-use infill…

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 70 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Lost your password?