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This topic contains 392 replies, has 80 voices, and was last updated by bjones7 bjones7 1 week, 3 days ago.

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  • #429174
    JeepGirl
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    thirstychef said:
    I don’t think that, but Columbus does have a resilency that helped us weather the economic climate of the last few years.

    I much prefer a government that would do things to help stimulate the energy of the city as well as the businesses that are located throughout the city.

    The Buckeyes, Crew, Clippers, and Blue Jackets (all sports teams) are good for the city. They create jobs, create tax revenue, and also synergy in the downtown/campus area.

    I want leadership that will do what it takes to get that going. It goes the same for the leadership that continues to get us the hotels that lead to more conventions, which leads full hotels, guests and visitors spending money in local bars, restaurants, and shops.

    If my property taxes go up or the meters on the streets are raised, etc, it is for the continued growth of of the city. Which is bigger than the individuals who post on any message board or blogspot.

    So where do you draw the line on raising taxes and meter rates to so the city can pay for this presumed stimulation of economic activity? Do you have a limit?

    #429175
    thirstychef
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    JeepGirl, that is a good question. I don’t have a set limit. What I have is a set of expectations. Over the last five years, those expectations have been met by the local government.

    If they fail to meet my expectations, then the next voting time comes around, I go against them.

    I can’t say that the NBA would succeed, but am happy to see the people voted into office are thinking big.

    We all know there are other powerbrokers behind the scenes, but that is probably for another thread. :)

    #429176
    JeepGirl
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    thirstychef said:
    JeepGirl, that is a good question. I don’t have a set limit. What I have is a set of expectations. Over the last five years, those expectations have been met by the local government.

    If they fail to meet my expectations, then the next voting time comes around, I go against them.

    I can’t say that the NBA would succeed, but am happy to see the people voted into office are thinking big.

    We all know there are other powerbrokers behind the scenes, but that is probably for another thread. :)

    Fair enough. Agreed that thinking big is good if it’s a realistically achievable goal. I would rather see my elected officials spending their paid time working to bring realistic benefits to the city vs day dreaming about very questionable and unlikely opportunities.

    #429177
    Walker Evans
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    JeepGirl said:
    I would rather see my elected officials spending their paid time working to bring realistic benefits to the city vs day dreaming about very questionable and unlikely opportunities.

    +1

    If we’re going to take risks with public investments for economic growth, why not mitigate that risk by spreading it across a wide variety of projects?

    In other words… instead of shelling out $100 million (totally making that number up) in tax breaks and incentives to a single entity like an NBA team, divide it up and give out $1,000,000 to 100 smaller projects all over the city.

    I’m sure a cool million could put a serious jumpstart on a project like the Linden Cleve Theater Renovation which could become a great pride point, culture creator and potential job center for a neighborhood that might not feel any economic ripples from something like a new NBA team.

    #429178

    I am 3
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    Walker said:
    +1

    If we’re going to take risks with public investments for economic growth, why not mitigate that risk by spreading it across a wide variety of projects?

    In other words… instead of shelling out $100 million (totally making that number up) in tax breaks and incentives to a single entity like an NBA team, divide it up and give out $1,000,000 to 100 smaller projects all over the city.

    I’m sure a cool million could put a serious jumpstart on a project like the Linden Cleve Theater Renovation which could become a great pride point, culture creator and potential job center for a neighborhood that might not feel any economic ripples from something like a new NBA team.

    Wonderfull idea, and a much better use of money

    #429179

    mrpoppinzs
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    As an Arena District resident and property owner, I think Mayor Coleman is just trying to help people partially lured by tax benefits to the downtown entertainment area. My condo is severely underwater and when the tax abatement ends there will be many people like myself questioning their investment. I see this as Mayor Coleman keeping an inferred promise to help expand residential living in downtown Columbus. He has helped before and I think he will continue his path.

    Thank you Mayor Coleman, you have true urban vision! The Arena District owes you a major debt.

    #429180

    columbusmike
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    mrpoppinzs said:
    As an Arena District resident and property owner, I think Mayor Coleman is just trying to help people partially lured by tax benefits to the downtown entertainment area. My condo is severely underwater and when the tax abatement ends there will be many people like myself questioning their investment. I see this as Mayor Coleman keeping an inferred promise to help expand residential living in downtown Columbus. He has helped before and I think he will continue his path.

    Thank you Mayor Coleman, you have true urban vision! The Arena District owes you a major debt.

    Sorry to hear your situation. I’m not sure Coleman wants to lure an NBA team to Columbus to help pad condo prices. I think he sees it as another opportunity to grow Columbus into a great, vibrant city. There is already so much to do in this city, and an NBA team would just be another draw for those considering relocating to the 614.

    #429181

    mrpoppinzs
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    Yeah, I thought there might be some other reasons too, but I won’t complain if it helps my hood.:) Seriously though, Columbus has a growing multifaceted image. I think outsiders are seeing Columbus is not just OSU and Campus. People are coming to Columbus to see the SN, and Arena District. In the long run I think efforts such as this will bring more people into the core and help further diversify the local entertainment economy and experience.

    The AD is a great place to live and big ideas like bringing a franchise to downtown will trickle into the whole area and imho speed its growth. Having multiple reasons Columbus is on the national map will definitely add to its draw. I am very optimistic that there is a long term commitment to grow Columbus on the national level.

    #429182
    JeepGirl
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    mrpoppinzs said:
    As an Arena District resident and property owner, I think Mayor Coleman is just trying to help people partially lured by tax benefits to the downtown entertainment area. My condo is severely underwater and when the tax abatement ends there will be many people like myself questioning their investment. I see this as Mayor Coleman keeping an inferred promise to help expand residential living in downtown Columbus. He has helped before and I think he will continue his path.

    Thank you Mayor Coleman, you have true urban vision! The Arena District owes you a major debt.

    Geez, another risky $100 million (Walkers made-up number) poured into the AD to further protect rich condo owners (of course, you knew that tax abatement would end at some point and still choose to move there) or as Walker suggested, spread those monies around the city for the benefit of a greater population as well as delude the risk on public funds. Walkers idea trounces Colemans.

    #429183

    mrpoppinzs
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    While I applaud Walker’s idea and still think it can happen, it is more intramural in nature. Columbus is a great city with many diverse neighborhoods and grassroots efforts to improve quality of life. Those efforts though are much easier seeded on a community level. Putting Columbus on the national stage is different and maybe a much harder endeavor. It pushes the comfort zone. It takes a lot of swagger to play outside your home court. ;)

    #429184

    lifeontwowheels
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    Walker said:
    +1

    If we’re going to take risks with public investments for economic growth, why not mitigate that risk by spreading it across a wide variety of projects?

    In other words… instead of shelling out $100 million (totally making that number up) in tax breaks and incentives to a single entity like an NBA team, divide it up and give out $1,000,000 to 100 smaller projects all over the city.

    I’m sure a cool million could put a serious jumpstart on a project like the Linden Cleve Theater Renovation which could become a great pride point, culture creator and potential job center for a neighborhood that might not feel any economic ripples from something like a new NBA team.

    Absolutely

    #429185
    thirstychef
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    Then everyone’s arguments are sound in their own right. It just depends what you want/need out of the city’s investment/spending.

    I do think at some point a neighborhood (business and home owners) need to take responsibility and make the improvements that will revitalize their areas.

    A community expecting a handout from ths city is no different than a condo owner hoping to have his property value go up with the money poured into the Arena District.

    #429186
    Pickerington_Kyle
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    Or what if we invest 200 million? 100 million for an NBA team and 1 million to 100 small local projects? :)

    #429187
    JeepGirl
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    thirstychef said:
    Then everyone’s arguments are sound in their own right. It just depends what you want/need out of the city’s investment/spending.

    I do think at some point a neighborhood (business and home owners) need to take responsibility and make the improvements that will revitalize their areas.

    A community expecting a handout from ths city is no different than a condo owner hoping to have his property value go up with the money poured into the Arena District.

    As long as there is some sort of balance in the distribution of public funds. In Columbus there isn’t.

    You make a good point that residents/business owners should step up. Since they’ve already received substantial city/public investment over the years, wonder if the Arena District condo/business owners would consider investing in their neighborhood and fronting the $100 million to bring an NBA team to Nationwide? I mean it’s their property values that would increase, correct?

    #429188
    thirstychef
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    JeepGirl said:
    As long as there is some sort of balance in the distribution of public funds. In Columbus there isn’t.

    You make a good point that residents/business owners should step up. Since they’ve already received substantial city/public investment over the years, wonder if the Arena District condo/business owners would consider investing in their neighborhood and fronting the $100 million to bring an NBA team to Nationwide? I mean it’s their property values that would increase, correct?

    And I thought I was a cynical person….;)

    I would say that the average person who lives in the AD, KLD, Arlington, Clintonvile, Grandview,etc, has more of a positive impact on the city in general, than those who live in the Bottoms, Southside, East Side, etc.

    So if there is choice for the government to invest in, which is going to get a better return on the investment?

    The areas that have been developed by the city have been an asset to everyone, but the poor people who used to live in those “revitalized” areas have just moved to another part of the city.

    Ironically the people who need the investment the most are the people who are already pissing away much of the government’s money. Granted that isn’t the case for everyone in a specific area, but it is the norm.

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