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Here's how you get fat...

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This topic contains 101 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by Coremodels Coremodels 1 year, 8 months ago.

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  • #530234

    GCrites80s
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    I’ll maintain that mandatory food labels actually made people fatter. When people grocery shop they look at the label and try to get all those numbers on the top half as low as possible. In order for them to do that, they have to take all the flavor, fullness and substance out of the food. So they eat their 172 calorie 2g of fat dinner. Then comes the 10pm pigout on ice cream and chocolate (or a late night pizza order) because they snapped from trying to survive on the bird food from earlier. And they wind up being unable to stand to eat at home often and wind up eating out all the time because they made their home food is so unfulfilling with all this “Lite” fake food.

    This doesn’t apply to everyone of course, but I think it’s happening a lot more than people think on the surface.

    A lot of that Outerbelt food is like that Cheescake Factory example. I read one of those “Eat This Not Thats” that my mother handed me to read. Some of that stuff was shocking. Good thing I don’t eat Outerbelt food that often.

    #530235

    derwentez
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    Coremodels said:
    I’d say a bigger reason people are fat is that restaurants like Cheesecake Factory are serving chicken dishes with more calories than a 12 piece.

    BTW, that wasn’t even their worst offering…They’ve got one called the Bistro Shrimp Pasta…sounds like a low fat, healthy option…I mean it says bistro.

    3,120 calories and 89 grams of saturated fat.

    far more people believe, and participate, in the anti-fat fad than eat these calorie-laden meals. i would guess the ratio is ridiculously large.

    #530236
    Coremodels
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    1. I don’t disagree with the labels and anti-fat thing. A great example is all the “low fat” products (particularly dairy) people buy that are actually sky high in sugar.

    2. Don’t underestimate the Cheesecake Factory numbers. They sell about a billion and a half dollars a year of this stuff.

    #530237
    Alex Silbajoris
    Alex Silbajoris
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    I posted this here in 2007

    No burger, no fry.
    No burger, no fry.

    Said said

    Said I remember when we used to snack
    on the hot hamburger, and the french fry.
    Before all the doctors warned us off the fat,
    and it would mingle with the good flavors we had.

    The weight we gained, the weight we lost, along the way…
    In the low-fat future, you can forget your past.
    So dry your chin, I say.

    And, no burger, no fry.
    No burger, no fry.
    Dear little darling, don’t shake no salt.
    No burger, no fry.

    Said I remember when we used to snack
    on the hot hamburger, and the french fry.
    And then Georgie would get the fire lit
    and it was lump wood burning through the night.
    Then we’d cook a meal on it
    (of which I’ve had a few)

    My diet is my only plan now,
    and so I’ve got to push on through, and while I’m on
    Everything is gonna be low-fat.
    Everything is gonna be low-fat.
    Everything is gonna be low-fat.
    Everything is gonna be low-fat.
    Everything is gonna be low-fat.
    Everything is gonna be low-fat.
    Everything is gonna be low-fat.
    Everything is gonna be low-fat.

    No burger, no fry.
    No burger, no fry.
    Pretty little woman, don’t shake no salt
    No burger, no fry.

    #530238

    leftovers
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    derwentez said:
    as long as the butter is unsalted grass-fed (even raw (gasp!)) it’s not bad for you. the anti-fat fad is another reason people are fat and/or unhealthy.

    +1 agreed

    I have no idea what kind of butter he uses (but it probably comes from GFS).

    Though dieting is 80% what you eat, I found that exercising helps keep you honest. It is pretty startling to be on elliptical for 30 minutes and only burn 400 calories. It makes me less likely to order that 390 calorie large fries with my burger.

    #530239

    tdziemia
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    Chili’s, Cheesecake Factory, KFC, Micky D’s … It’s all total shit, and it’s part of what’s making America sick, poor, and prematurely dead. (Poor because of our health care entitlements and effect on our debt).

    As enumerated by other posters, it’s high in calories (obesity), high in refined carbs (diabetes), high in sodium (high blood pressure). No redeeming nutritional value.

    I’m gonna add Starbucks to the list, too, but then admit it’s my “go to” place for a small, reasonably priced dessert every now and then (read: brownie). But golook at the calories in a grande latte, even with skim milk, and you’ll likely be shocked outta your mind.

    But if you’re reading this thread, it’s preaching to the choir, right?

    #530240

    pez
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    Coremodels said:
    “Most people wouldn’t sit down to eat a 12-piece bucket of Original Recipe KFC all by themselves, says CSPI. Yet The Cheesecake Factory somehow crams about that many calories into a single serving of its Crispy Chicken Costoletta—though the bucket of KFC has less than half the saturated fat, “only” two days’ worth as opposed to the four-and-a-half days’ worth in the costoletta.”

    http://cspinet.org/new/201301161.html

    In reality, the occasional crispy chicken costoletta is not going to make anyone fat. The long term poor nutritional and exercise choices of people are what makes them fat, this item is just an example of one of those poor decisions. I do advocate for posting nutritional information, but in the end those that are going to make bad choices will continue to do so.

    #530241

    myliftkk
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    leftovers said:
    The problem is as a customer you do not really know what is going into your food. A friend who is a cook in the SN often laughs and tells me how much butter he uses. I went on a diet and he basically told me to avoid eating out.

    Nor do I know what’s in most grocery boxed items except that they have the most amazing chemical names. General rule of thumb: if it tastes like a stick of butter, it’s probably got a stick of butter in it.

    I eat to live though, and on most days that’s the only reason I eat at all. If I could get away with being breatharian 90% of the time, I would do so. Eating out I do for simplicity sake, because the time cost/benefit is better for me to do so than not. I don’t recommend it to people who have a habit of making bad food choices over and over, but it’s completely doable to eat carryout virtually every meal (granted I eat only twice a day at most) for years and not see any noticeable difference.

    #530242

    tdziemia
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    pez said:
    I do advocate for posting nutritional information, but in the end those that are going to make bad choices will continue to do so.

    Amen. My kids had the example of home cooked meals on the table most nights (despite two demanding careers), a bowl of fresh fruit on the counter, and relatively little in the way of unhealthy snacks lying around (pretzel nuggets and low fat Cheezits were the family faves). They did go through a period of excessive Gatorade consumption related to high school athletics, but as soon as they had to buy it for themselves, and saw the effect of the calories when their activity levels decreased, they gave it up. As young adults they are relatively fit (by American standards), pay attention to what goes into their bodies, and are beginning to cook for themselves.
    If the parents set a poor example, the kids are almost sure to follow. That’s what’s been going on in Ameica for the lat two generations, and we need to find a way to stop it, before we bankrupt the country taking care of all the peventable disease that stems from poor diet.

    #530243
    Jason Powell
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    Prepare fresh food at home on weekdays (many DO have the time but cooking seems to be a lost art), splurge once or twice on the weekend (so as not to get burnt out) and do a little exercise. Simple as that. Not too difficult. Most Americans are just too lazy and/or uneducated on how easy it is to live a fairly healthy life.

    #530244

    tdziemia
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    You don’t have time to cook if you’re watching 4 hours of TV per day :-) (just to like two of America’s ills.(

    #530245

    tdziemia
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    .. oops, meant to say “just to LINK two of America’s ills.

    #530246

    Jman4ever
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    My contribution to this thread.

    I used to work in the corporate office at Max & Erma’s and we/they were a part of the problem no doubt.

    One of the founders (Barry Zacks) was ahead of his time on a number of fronts. (There is little doubt that the chains downturn began after his passing) One of his ideals was to put nutritional info on the menus. He wanted to do this in the early 80s (81 or 82) So he brings in a nutrionist to get the numbers together.

    Turns out back then the lowest calorie item on the menu.

    Hot Apple Pie alamode (not alamode wasn’t a specifically stated menu option)

    Ideal scrapped.

    As far as the Cheesecake Factory goes they are a volume volume volume outfit. Their meals are typically big enough for 2 sittings at the least.

    The Cheesecake Factory in Las Vegas for one New Years Eve did the same business volume($$ wise) in that day as an above average Max & Erma’s does in a month. They had something like 3 shipments of food delivered during that day.

    #530247

    pez
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    myliftkk said:
    Nor do I know what’s in most grocery boxed items except that they have the most amazing chemical names. General rule of thumb: if it tastes like a stick of butter, it’s probably got a stick of butter in it.

    Or an even worse for you artificially flavored frankenbutter. Within reason, butter is actually not a bad choice compared to its substitutes.

    #530248
    Scapino
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    GCrites80s said:
    I’ll maintain that mandatory food labels actually made people fatter. When people grocery shop they look at the label and try to get all those numbers on the top half as low as possible. In order for them to do that, they have to take all the flavor, fullness and substance out of the food. So they eat their 172 calorie 2g of fat dinner. Then comes the 10pm pigout on ice cream and chocolate (or a late night pizza order) because they snapped from trying to survive on the bird food from earlier. And they wind up being unable to stand to eat at home often and wind up eating out all the time because they made their home food is so unfulfilling with all this “Lite” fake food.

    This doesn’t apply to everyone of course, but I think it’s happening a lot more than people think on the surface.

    A lot of that Outerbelt food is like that Cheescake Factory example. I read one of those “Eat This Not Thats” that my mother handed me to read. Some of that stuff was shocking. Good thing I don’t eat Outerbelt food that often.

    Let’s not pretend this is limited to the poor suburbanites’ chain restaurants. The chain restaurants are much more likely to have a 500 calories or less section and will be subject to mandatory disclosure of nutritional information.

    Places like Skillet, Knead, Dirty Frank’s, and Schmidt’s aren’t exactly health food, as much as I love them. Just remember that the better the food tastes, the more butter they’re using.

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