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Grandview Yard - News & Updates

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This topic contains 737 replies, has 91 voices, and was last updated by Josh Miller Josh Miller 2 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #452729
    rus
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    columbusmike said:
    A smaller store often means fewer choices, not necessarily higher prices. If you go to a Kroger or Giant Eagle, they stock about 20 varieties of ruffled potato chips, where as a small store might only stock 3 varieties of potato chips.

    Only true if the smaller stores can purchase goods from distributors at the same prices as larger stores. In other words, a smaller store that’s part of a large chain may be cost competitive with those larger stores but a small independent likely wouldn’t be. Instead, they’d focus on different goods.

    #452730

    columbusmike
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    rus said:
    Only true if the smaller stores can purchase goods from distributors at the same prices as larger stores. In other words, a smaller store that’s part of a large chain may be cost competitive with those larger stores but a small independent likely wouldn’t be. Instead, they’d focus on different goods.

    I’ve done some price checking at Huffman’s Market (small, independent grocery store in UA) compared to Giant Eagle/Kroger. It wasn’t exactly scientific, but the prices were comparable. Obviously, deals on different items at different times made it hard to tell exactly, but there wasn’t anything that made me go “yowzers”!

    I’m happy that there are big grocery stores in town….I think it’s great to have a place where you can get a wide variety of items for parties, etc. I just don’t know if it’s a great idea to abandon/prohibit more neighborhood-scaled grocery stores that can serve people 90% of the year without the need of a car/lots of driving.

    #452731
    Walker Evans
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    rus said:
    If cheaper goods is your goal, how does having lots of little stores get you there? If anything, the lower volumes would indicate a higher per unit cost and, thus, higher consumer prices.

    How are you defining “little” stores? I’m saying that the cost of goods for the consumer doesn’t vary between a 30,000 sqft Giant Eagle and a 100,000 sqft Giant Eagle. So to that end, it would be better for a community to have three smaller stores rather than one big one.

    rus said:
    We’ve already seen that consumers will chose a lower cost item over a higher cost one of equal value ( see walmart, target, etc. ).

    Generally speaking, yes. But niche markets don’t always hold fast to the national trends. I’d argue that many Grandview and Victorian Village shoppers are more inclined to pay more for quality and convenience over big box pricing.

    Even the big boxes understand that urban neighborhoods are different market than what their suburban stores have traditionally provided. And they’re looking to adapt:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43414111/ns/business-retail/t/wal-mart-other-big-boxes-try-out-smaller-boxes/

    rus said:
    People may say they want walkable neighborhoods and local shopping, but haven’t been paying for it. Instead, they drive to a big box or a strip mall.

    Because they don’t have much in the way of a choice. And if someone here on CU wants to try to affect change in what should expected of a retail developer, you’re usually the first person to counter argue that the developer should be allowed to do whatever they want and customers should just deal with it.

    rus said:
    Seems like people prefer that rather than figuring out which little shop is carrying which thing they want or making do with what they find.

    It seems like people here are saying the exact opposite of that, for what it’s worth. Not that you’re interested in listening to something that goes against your own thoughts on a topic. :P

    Anyway, you shouldn’t worry too much about this. No one is going to pry the big box stores away from you. If anything, this area is getting a bigger Giant Eagle.

    #452732
    rus
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    columbusmike said:
    I just don’t know if it’s a great idea to abandon/prohibit more neighborhood-scaled grocery stores that can serve people 90% of the year without the need of a car/lots of driving.

    As I read that, it strikes me that abandon and prohibit are vastly different ideas. If people don’t choose to shop at a certain store they’re abandoning it… very different thing from government stepping in to remove it.

    If people want a smaller grocery store they can walk to, pay for it by shopping there. Figure that’s why Rife’s is still in business. Helps that Rife’s offers some products you don’t see in other places as well, of course.

    #452733
    rus
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    Walker said:
    How are you defining “little” stores? I’m saying that the cost of goods for the consumer doesn’t vary between a 30,000 sqft Giant Eagle and a 100,000 sqft Giant Eagle. So to that end, it would be better for a community to have three smaller stores rather than one big one.

    If you mean three competing smaller stores, then the competition might be useful sure.

    Walker said:
    Generally speaking, yes. But niche markets don’t always hold fast to the national trends. I’d argue that many Grandview and Victorian Village shoppers are more inclined to pay more for quality and convenience over big box pricing.

    Even the big boxes understand that urban neighborhoods are different market than what their suburban stores have traditionally provided. And they’re looking to adapt:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43414111/ns/business-retail/t/wal-mart-other-big-boxes-try-out-smaller-boxes/

    Possible, I suppose. I really hate agreeing with people here, but I live in the area and tend to buy a good bit of stuff locally.

    Sounds like I should do something else.

    Walker said:

    It seems like people here are saying the exact opposite of that, for what it’s worth. Not that you’re interested in listening to something that goes against your own thoughts on a topic. :P

    Oh right, because limited variety / selection is exactly more choice. :P

    #452734

    kit444
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    When I lived in Chicago, going grocery shopping was the one time I wished I had a car. Walking to the grocery store sounds romantic, but walking back loaded with groceries is a pain in the ass.

    #452735

    mrpoppinzs
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    ^ +1 to that…

    #452736
    rus
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    kit444 said:
    When I lived in Chicago, going grocery shopping was the one time I wished I had a car. Walking to the grocery store sounds romantic, but walking back loaded with groceries is a pain in the ass.

    Having schlepped groceries on a subway train… yeah.

    #452737

    myliftkk
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    Doesn’t carryout solve this problem?

    #452738

    columbusmike
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    rus said:
    If people want a smaller grocery store they can walk to, pay for it by shopping there. Figure that’s why Rife’s is still in business. Helps that Rife’s offers some products you don’t see in other places as well, of course.

    I think you’re assuming people recognize that their consumer choices have results ;)

    #452739
    rus
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    columbusmike said:
    I think you’re assuming people recognize that their consumer choices have results ;)

    HA! Or even that people have to pay, one way or another, for what they want. ;)

    #452740
    Walker Evans
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    rus said:
    If people want a smaller grocery store they can walk to, pay for it by shopping there.

    In many areas, this option doesn’t exist, so that idea of supporting something with your wallet is not an option. You have to do it vocally first, which is exactly what is going on right here in this very thread.

    #452741
    rus
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    Walker said:
    In many areas, this option doesn’t exist, so that idea of supporting something with your wallet is not an option. You have to do it vocally first, which is exactly what is going on right here in this very thread.

    Putting aside the idea that complaining on a internet forum is somehow effective and that if people have never had such a thing how can they possibly know it’s a good idea…

    Figure if GE does move to the yard and shutters one or both currently walkable locations then people who’d prefer a walkable location could shop somewhere else and inform GE of their choice along with their reasoning.

    Perhaps additionally point out the existing locations to competitors ( kroger, trader joes, whole foods, what have you ) as well.

    Figure if the move hurts GE’s bottom line they’ll get the message. Also, if a competitor moves in successfully that provides a case study which proves the concept to the industry.

    Nothing like greed to motivate people.

    Provided, of course, there’s enough people who want to spend money in walkable grocery stores.

    #452742
    Walker Evans
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    rus said:
    Putting aside the idea that complaining on a internet forum is somehow effective and that if people have never had such a thing how can they possibly know it’s a good idea…

    1. Discussions on this site have often had real-world impacts in this city. Not saying that’s always the case… but if you don’t think information here is read by decision makers, then you’re wrong.

    2. You’re really going to make it a requirement for people to have whatever you personally deem as an appropriate amount of experience with something in order to be allowed to state a preference for something? I guess that also means that no one is allowed to be in favor of a Giant Eagle on Third Avenue because they’ve never had one there. How could they possibly know if it’s a good idea?

    rus said:
    Figure if GE does move to the yard and shutters one or both currently walkable locations then people who’d prefer a walkable location could shop somewhere else and inform GE of their choice along with their reasoning.

    Perhaps additionally point out the existing locations to competitors ( kroger, trader joes, whole foods, what have you ) as well.

    Figure if the move hurts GE’s bottom line they’ll get the message. Also, if a competitor moves in successfully that provides a case study which proves the concept to the industry.

    Nothing like greed to motivate people.

    Provided, of course, there’s enough people who want to spend money in walkable grocery stores.

    I agree that people can shop elsewhere and vote with their wallets, even if they aren’t exactly what you might individually want (driving to Trader Joe’s instead of having one closer to home). But that’s not quite the same as what you said earlier with “If people want a smaller grocery store they can walk to, pay for it by shopping there”. That’s still not always an option.

    #452743
    Caleb
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    I say we complain to GE and if they do build one.. boycott it :P

Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 738 total)

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