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Grandview Yard Giant Eagle

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This topic contains 735 replies, has 85 voices, and was last updated by  GCrites80s 1 month, 1 week ago.

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  • #496144
    rus
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    JeepGirl said:
    Guessing that they’re designing the development for the benefit of the type of consumer that would most often shop there. The shear size alone screams automobile arrival. Making vehicle access and parking easy and convenient makes business sense even at the expense of a few urban/pedestrian/cycling enthusiasts.

    Does seem like that, doesn’t it?

    But of course if you’d rather drive to get groceries instead of lugging them on your back whilst hiking in a pool of sweat emanating from your nether regions you’re just old. OLD I SAY.

    #496145

    columbusmike
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    JeepGirl said:
    Guessing that they’re designing the development for the benefit of the type of consumer that would most often shop there. The shear size alone screams automobile arrival. Making vehicle access and parking easy and convenient makes business sense even at the expense of a few urban/pedestrian/cycling enthusiasts.

    Again, we’ve completely lost the understanding and importance of public space in our country. I can’t believe anyone would argue for a city full of parking lots and slight convenience over the richness of a vibrant urban city.

    It’s a failure of our country’s zoning codes.

    #496146

    jbcmh81
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    joshlapp said:
    I would think its obvious. Are you more likely to walk to somewhere that is up against the street and easy to walk to or 100 yards away where to have to walk through a parking lot full of cars fighting over the closest parking spot and not paying attention to you?

    Also which is more appealing to the eye? Its time we stopped building for cars and start building for people. Even by putting the parking in the back or on the side you are vastly improving the pedestrian experience which barely impacting the driving experience.

    Building for cars is not the problem here, it’s where building for cars is happening in this case. The people moving to the urban core don’t want suburbia, they want walkability and public transit. Forcing car-oriented development into the urban core makes zero sense.

    #496147

    columbusmike
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    rus said:
    But of course if you’d rather drive to get groceries instead of lugging them on your back whilst hiking in a pool of sweat emanating from your nether regions you’re just old. OLD I SAY.

    I’ve been to many downtown groceries (in much denser locations) and they have curb-side covered parking/loading. It’s actually extremely convenient and you stay out of the rain while loading up groceries.

    #496148

    ricospaz
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    Twixlen said:
    After driving around Chicago for an hour and twenty minutes, around 9pm one Friday night, looking for a parking spot w/in 4 blocks of our destination, I can’t help but scoff at anyone complaining about parking here. Even during our very biggest events, it’s easy to park somewhere nearby, with a less-than-half-mile walk.

    Do I even need to say this? This isn’t Chicago.

    #496149
    rus
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    columbusmike said:
    Again, we’ve completely lost the understanding and importance of public space in our country. I can’t believe anyone would argue for a city full of parking lots and slight convenience over the richness of a vibrant urban city.

    It’s a failure of our country’s zoning codes.

    Just so I understand what you’re talking about, what part of columbus is “vibrant”?

    #496150
    rus
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    ricospaz said:
    Do I even need to say this? This isn’t Chicago.

    Thankfully.

    #496151

    jbcmh81
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    ricospaz said:
    +1 . lot of complainers on here.

    It’s not complaining to complain. You either want and appreciate good urban design and planning, or you live in New Albany. They both have their own merits, but let’s not act like if you don’t like suburbia in the urban core, you’re just a whiner.

    #496152

    jbcmh81
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    cheap said:
    this looks a lot like Mill Run in Hilliard,where the closed down Big Bear is.

    That was one of the very first places I lived once I got out of my own, in an apartment right near the corner of Roberts and Hilliard-Rome. That was just a strip plaza and a perfect example of suburban building styles. Hilliard-Rome is the furthest thing from an urban landscape I can imagine.

    #496153

    ricospaz
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    jbcmh81 said:
    It’s not complaining to complain. You either want and appreciate good urban design and planning, or you live in New Albany. They both have their own merits, but let’s not act like if you don’t like suburbia in the urban core, you’re just a whiner.

    I guess I’m not understanding what is considered the ‘urban core’ . I bought a house in Grandview that would keep me close to downtown and everything it had to offer as well as the ability to hit Home Depot or any ‘big box’ store that I needed to, without driving for 30 minutes. Would I like it if they put a Home Depot in /near Grandview? Hell yes.

    And yes I KNOW, there’s a Home Depot on Broad, Mill Run, etc.

    This new Giant Eagle is not in the Urban Core, it’s West of it. the River or Olentangy RR defines this to me.

    #496154
    JeepGirl
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    columbusmike said:
    Again, we’ve completely lost the understanding and importance of public space in our country. I can’t believe anyone would argue for a city full of parking lots and slight convenience over the richness of a vibrant urban city.

    It’s a failure of our country’s zoning codes.

    This development is public space?

    #496155

    columbusmike
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    rus said:
    Just so I understand what you’re talking about, what part of columbus is “vibrant”?

    I agree, there aren’t many places. I would say Grandview Ave, High Street, Gay Street downtown, old Westerville. Those are all different scales of vibrancy – none that I would consider overly dense or overwhelming.

    #496156

    columbusmike
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    JeepGirl said:
    This development is public space?

    Every development is public space! From the centerline of the road to the right-of-way on each side is paid for by you and me.

    #496157
    rus
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    columbusmike said:
    I agree, there aren’t many places. I would say Grandview Ave, High Street, Gay Street downtown, old Westerville. Those are all different scales of vibrancy – none that I would consider overly dense or overwhelming.

    To be clear, I wasn’t making a statement. Really don’t know what you mean by “vibrant”. Sounds like you mean “people walking around”.

    #496158

    jbcmh81
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    rus said:
    Yet another reason to avoid chicago and keep columbus from looking like chicago.

    Chicago is a world-class city, and it didn’t become that way catering to Super Wal-Marts. It has problems, like any city, but it also has plenty of suburban areas that people can live too. It doesn’t have to be an either-or scenario where you have ample parking or your city sucks.

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