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Gahanna: Home to ONLY train manufacturer in US?

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This topic contains 20 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  ehill27 1 year, 7 months ago.

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  • #79063

    ehill27
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    According to this article:

    Quote:
    The former Colorado Rail Car, which has since been purchased by a Gahanna-based company and renamed U.S. Rail Car, is the only U.S. manufacturer of the trains.

    Say what?! Really?

    On the web at http://www.usrailcar.com (notice the skyline on the header image). Additional news here.

    Anyone have any more info on this? Are they actually building this plant?

    #319932

    ehill27
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    Well, found some more info here.

    10/23/2009 – Though it has yet to open a factory, a Columbus rail car company is making a name for itself on Capitol Hill.

    US Railcar LLC CEO Michael Pracht has been meeting with congressional members and staffers in recent months, and his efforts are getting the company noticed. US Railcar was the only manufacturer to testify at an Oct. 14 hearing on long-term federal funding questions for American rail projects, and Pracht also took part in a July roundtable on rail issues put on by a House transportation subcommittee.

    #319933
    groundrules
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    i suspec that “gahanna-based” does not necessarily mean ‘gahanna manufactured’. corporate ownership and production are often quite separate.

    #319934

    pez
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    What do they consider ‘train manufacturing’? General Electric makes locomotives in Erie, PA. The interesting thing about trains is that the diesel engine just runs a generator, the actual wheels are propelled by electric motors fed from the generator.

    #319935
    groundrules
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    pez wrote >>
    What do they consider ‘train manufacturing’? General Electric makes locomotives in Erie, PA. The interesting thing about trains is that the diesel engine just runs a generator, the actual wheels are propelled by electric motors fed from the generator.

    I think the “only manufacturer” is in reference to the DMU type trains, not regular freight trains.

    and yeah, while I have no proof in the railroad world, my theory is that the advantage of electric power (via diesel generation) is that an electric motor has very different power delivery properties versus an internal combustion engine. For instance, you can get very near maximum torque (which is nice for hauling a big-ass load) at almost zero RPM, where as an internal combustion engine has an incremental power delivery that increases with engine speed. This requires that you have a transmission so that you can rev the engine to a torque producing speed but still allow the train wheels to turn slowly. An electric motor doesn’t require that, and in fact doesn’t care if it’s running fast or slow or forward or backward.

    there. discuss.

    #319936

    pez
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    groundrules wrote >>

    I think the “only manufacturer” is in reference to the DMU type trains, not regular freight trains.
    and yeah, while I have no proof in the railroad world, my theory is that the advantage of electric power (via diesel generation) is that an electric motor has very different power delivery properties versus an internal combustion engine. For instance, you can get very near maximum torque (which is nice for hauling a big-ass load) at almost zero RPM, where as an internal combustion engine has an incremental power delivery that increases with engine speed. This requires that you have a transmission so that you can rev the engine to a torque producing speed but still allow the train wheels to turn slowly. An electric motor doesn’t require that, and in fact doesn’t care if it’s running fast or slow or forward or backward.
    there. discuss.

    From what I remember, you are right, electric motors can provide significant amounts of their torque at low speed, and you can run them backwards as well as forward, so you’ll often see one of the locomotives on a double or triple engine train in line backwards, but I assume that’s more to ease switching them to new trains at the other end.

    #319937
    Alex Silbajoris
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    I’ve driven electric forklifts and they’re the same way, they have all their torque immediately so they can really launch.

    Locomotives have fan pages. For example, I have a picture of one of the downtown bridges with a CSX train on it, and I can make out the number 8018. So google CSX 8018 and you get its fan page:

    http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/locopicture.aspx?id=1120

    Those things get around.

    #319938

    ehill27
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    groundrules wrote >>
    I think the “only manufacturer” is in reference to the DMU type trains, not regular freight trains.

    Ahh… that makes sense. Thanks.

    I don’t know what was more shocking… not having any clue about this company in the area, or the notion that there is only one train manufacturer in the entire US.

    #319939

    pedex
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    groundrules wrote >>

    pez wrote >>
    What do they consider ‘train manufacturing’? General Electric makes locomotives in Erie, PA. The interesting thing about trains is that the diesel engine just runs a generator, the actual wheels are propelled by electric motors fed from the generator.

    I think the “only manufacturer” is in reference to the DMU type trains, not regular freight trains.
    and yeah, while I have no proof in the railroad world, my theory is that the advantage of electric power (via diesel generation) is that an electric motor has very different power delivery properties versus an internal combustion engine. For instance, you can get very near maximum torque (which is nice for hauling a big-ass load) at almost zero RPM, where as an internal combustion engine has an incremental power delivery that increases with engine speed. This requires that you have a transmission so that you can rev the engine to a torque producing speed but still allow the train wheels to turn slowly. An electric motor doesn’t require that, and in fact doesn’t care if it’s running fast or slow or forward or backward.
    there. discuss.

    that is more or less correct

    using diesel electric eliminates the need for a clutch which with a locomotive with 4000hp would be enormous and hard to control to begin with

    plus with locos weight is not an issue, they are typically ballasted up to their max weight which is 70,000lbs per axle

    tractive force is coefficient of friction times weight, that can be anywhere from .1 up to around .65 depending on track conditions

    a 6 axle loco will come in up around 420,000 lbs with a tractive force up around 140,000 lbs, friction coefficient runs around .33 or so normally and they have sand for when its slick that gets squirted in front of the wheels

    they have other physical limits like drawbar strength, it will snap at around 250,000 lbs of pull—so with multiple locos jamming the throttle to max is a no no and the modern locos won’t let that happen anyway, the power is very tightly controlled and wheel slip is limited otherwise the loco will literally rip the track to shreds

    using electric also allows the motors to be used as brakes, they call that dynamic braking where the motors act in reverse as generators shunted across a resistive load

    #319940
    byJody
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    The contact information for US Railcar is 919 Old Henderson Rd, Columbus, OH 43220 which is for The Depot[/url]. It must be the same owner.

    #319941
    cc
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    I have toured the Erie facility. It is one of the few places exporting American products to China.

    There are many U.S. companies manufacturing for the railroad industry. Wording and spin (and just plain poor journalism) can be incorporated into any press.

    http://www.manta.com/mb_35_A82E7000_000/railroad_equipment

    #319942
    cc
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    double post

    #319943
    Alex Silbajoris
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    Don’t the locos also have throttle presets ranging 1 – 8 so they can be set to the same power levels when coupled?

    The CSX line passes about 1/2 mile from this house. It’s climbing to the Powell Moraine, and the tracks in Linworth are about 100 feet higher than they are at Lane Avenue. The loaded northbound coal trains are hammering the throttle, but the southbound empties whoosh through quickly and quietly.

    #319944

    ehill27
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    Billionaire Icahn, local railcar firm form passenger-rail venture
    Thursday, February 18, 2010 6:34 PM
    By Marla Matzer Rose
    THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

    A local startup company that aims to make diesel-powered railcars announced a joint venture late today with another railcar startup backed by billionaire Carl Icahn.

    US Railcar, based in Columbus, and Missouri-based American Railcar Industries say they plan to actually make the railcars in Arkansas.

    Columbus investor Barry Fromm, who bought US Railcar out of bankruptcy last year, was passed over this week for $8 million in federal stimulus funds he hoped to receive. Fromm said earlier this week that he was still awaiting word from the Ohio Department of Development on a request for nearly $4 million in incentives to put a manufacturing facility in Gahanna.

    [url=http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/business/stories/2010/02/18/railcar_venture.html?sid=101]Link[/url]

    #319945
    deraj1013
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    From the Dispatch…

    Columbus rail plant plan might be derailed
    Ohio election results among key blows to local venture’s goal of passenger-rail-car factory

    By Marla Matzer Rose

    Two weeks after the Cleveland-Columbus-Cincinnati passenger-rail plan was effectively halted by John Kasich’s election as governor, plans for a Columbus-based passenger-rail manufacturing plant appear to be in jeopardy.

    Read more

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