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Downtown Parking - News & Updates

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This topic contains 66 replies, has 23 voices, and was last updated by News News 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 67 total)
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  • #396210
    anillo
    anillo
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    What if the issue isn’t a lack of parking though? I know on the weekends there’s an awful lot of empty spots.

    #396211

    ZHC
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    Walker wrote >>

    http://columbusunderground.com/archives/columbus-downtown-history.jpg

    That’s a very very cool graphic Walker. I’ve been staring at for about ten minutes now trying to figure what some of the buildings were (I think I can figure out where Morehouse Fashions might have been). You can really see where the population Used to live (South of State from the looks of it) and where it may makes sense (to me anyway) to try to put it back.

    Is it just me or is the Westin Great Southern missing from the 1951 map!!!???
    It looks like there is an empty white block where the Southern should be…

    #396212

    colrex7
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    I think parking is a factor in making sure downtown succeeds, but I cant help but wonder if another reason why downtowns in general have difficulties with attracting businesses and visitors is its unfamiliarity.
    Why are places like Easton, Polaris, Tuttle popular? Because they have well known stores that people are used to and know what to expect when they go. They are conveniently off the interstate, require no thought to park and there are signs clearly saying what stores are there, all in which are popular businesses.

    Downtown Columbus does not have familiar stores like Macy’s and parking is more challenging and expensive. Downtown Columbus isn’t like Downtown Chicago or Midtown Manhattan so there isn’t quite the same draw for visitors. This makes downtown not “worth” going to in many people’s eyes.
    It really just depends on the experience someone is looking for, there is definitely an experience downtown that you can’t get at the malls, and I think that is what downtown needs to capitalize on and leverage in order to draw more businesses, visitors, residents, and companies.

    #396213

    somebuckeye
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    I WENT BACK TO OHIO
    BUT MY CITY WAS GONE
    THERE WAS NO TRAIN STATION
    THERE WAS NO DOWNTOWN
    SOUTH HOWARD HAD DISAPPEARED
    ALL MY FAVORITE PLACES
    MY CITY HAD BEEN PULLED DOWN
    REDUCED TO PARKING SPACES
    A, O, WAY TO GO OHIO

    #396214

    johnwirtz
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    I think downtown will be more attractive to employers when it becomes a more accessible location for a larger percentage of the region’s population than any other location. That’s why downtowns in large cities like Chicago and NYC work.

    In Chicago, downtown is the only place you can locate and be accessible to the entire region. Most people on the North Shore don’t want to drive to the west suburbs. People in the south suburbs don’t want to drive to the north suburbs. It takes too long. Taking a CTA or Metra train to downtown is something everyone can do though.

    In Columbus, I would guess that Dublin is a more accessible location (in terms of time and money) for more employees than downtown. The relatively small size of the region, lack of congestion, and parking cost differential all play into this.

    So what’s the solution? Making it cheaper (in terms of time and money) for more people to get downtown. Downtown can’t compete with the suburbs on cheap parking and it shouldn’t try. To do so would mean building lots of very expensive land-consuming garages that would inhibit the pedestrian-oriented street life that makes a city a city. See the graphic for evidence of what happens to downtowns that try to provide parking for everyone.

    Transit however is very affordable, much cheaper than owning a car. It also doesn’t take up as much valuable land space as parking lots. So I think downtown needs to get more people to come by transit. That means transit commute times (and frequencies on express routes) have to improve. Right now, if you live more than about 5 miles from downtown – as most of the population does (I think) – it’s hard to get there on a bus in less than half an hour:

    http://xingcolumbus.wordpress.com/2010/08/12/a-30-minute-transit-time-map-for-cota/

    If COTA can get more people within a shorter transit trip to downtown, downtown will become more attractive to employers, and will also need less parking.

    #396215

    johnwirtz
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    Walker wrote >>
    Taking some of those flat lots and making a few of them free instead of $5/day will not radically change anything.

    I kind of like the solution that my current town (Evanston, IL) has come up with. There are basically three public garages in downtown. Parking is free for the first hour, $2 for the second hour, and it keeps going up after that to a max of $13 per day.

    This allows customers to make short retail trips without paying anything. A longer trip, maybe to a restaurant, only adds $2 to your bill. Work parking (6-12 hours) is $8, which is just high enough to make taking one of our two train lines or many bus services attractive.

    If you want to park closer to a destination than the public garage allows, meters are available on most streets for $0.75 per hour, which is probably underpriced on most blocks, for a maximum of two hours.

    Anyway, my point is that maybe first hour free parking in the public garages (and maybe lots) scattered about downtown would help smaller retailers like ZHC without providing incentive to drive for longer trips or compromising efforts to improve public transit.

    #396216
    Walker Evans
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    Has that impacted the cost of private lots nearby? I think Drew posted some thoughts awhile back about destroying the “cash cow” nature of prime private parking lots by having the city offer up free parking adjacent. Would incentivize those private lot owners to sell off the land to developers for other uses.

    Hrmm…

    #396217

    johnwirtz
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    I don’t think downtown Evanston has any privately owned surface lots that are used for public parking during the day. There are a few surface lots, but not many. One is owned by the Hilton hotel for guests, but is used for the Farmer’s Market on Saturdays. A few are city-owned that either have meters for each space or are available to permit-holders.

    Other than that the off-street parking is almost entirely in garages attached to offices or condos. I can’t say if it’s related to Drew’s plan or not. I’ve only been here for seven years, so perhaps Drew’s plan already did its magic here. Regardless though, downtown Evanston is markedly more vibrant than downtown Columbus. More buildings and less parking is the way to go.

    #396218

    ehill27
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    #396219
    News
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    Columbus Parking Garage Rates Below National Average
    Published on October 9, 2012 9:45 am
    By: Walker

    Every year, global commercial real estate organization Colliers International produces an annual survey on parking garage rates across the United States and Canada which they compile into a public report. Columbus was noteworthy in that there was zero change between 2011 and 2012′s pricing, while the national average rate of increase was 1.6 percent.

    READ MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/columbus-parking-rates-below-national-average

    #396220

    Taz Devil
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    Oh I am so relieved to be reading this, especially when the Wonder Bread development swallows up all of our off street parking and we are forced to this. Pshew.

    #396221
    Walker Evans
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    Taz Devil said:
    Oh I am so relieved to be reading this, especially when the Wonder Bread development swallows up all of our off street parking and we are forced to this. Pshew.

    So you’d rather the wonder bread building sit empty?

    #396222

    Taz Devil
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    No, I wish International wouldn’t have f*cked their employees that worked there over by making them take a pay cut to keep the factory open and then sack them anyway. What the developer is doing is called INTRUSION. The local residents that kept the neighborhood up while the factory sat empty are now getting f*cked. This was not the intent of the factory variance. Naturally, there is no opposition as money can be made. Talking to the City about permit parking is also useless.

    #396223
    Walker Evans
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    Building new residential units in a residential neighborhood is intrusion?

    I would think that building a factory in a residential neighborhood would be intrusion…

    #396224

    Taz Devil
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    The Parking is the issue, new development is not the issue. This topic is about Parking!

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