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DIY method to scarify concrete floor?

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This topic contains 13 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by Alex Silbajoris Alex Silbajoris 1 year, 3 months ago.

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  • #97156
    Alex Silbajoris
    Alex Silbajoris
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    Yesterday I fell in the garage when my wet bare feet hydroplaned on some very smooth concrete floor. I’ve slipped there before but this was the first fall.

    I want to grind or scratch some texture into it. Search results bring up big machines to grind away coatings and level slabs – is there some handheld tool to simply roughen the surface?

    Maybe a wire flail?

    218J4EN432L._SL500_SL160_.jpg

    Or something with teeth? Or would I be a watch-this-folks moron to spin something like this on a handheld drill?

    perago_triple.jpg

    Maybe I should just mix sand into porch enamel like I did with the front porch.

    #542296
    Manatee
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    Yoy! I know almost nothing about any of those experiments in terror, but I would bet just painting with non-skid sand paint would work and be easy.

    Of course now some concrete genius will probably tell me that you might have to etch the floor with acid first or something.

    #542297
    Alex Silbajoris
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    This garage slab has issues including heaving and spalling elsewhere so I won’t care much if paint does not adhere perfectly.

    The surface is pitted where road salt and tires have been on it, but this section is polished smooth by foot traffic alone.

    #542298

    derm
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    To do an inexpensive job yet effective – Power wash with a degreaser to get oil and what not off it then either use concrete paint or stain with the sand/grit additive they sell for just such non-skid use in concrete. Did that on some steps, works just fine. All products sold at HD or Lowe’s. Easy to use. If you want to fill the pitted spots to level it, they sell a concrete leveling product you apply with a large squeegee live you are doing asphalt coating. Also fairly inexpensive and easy, do this to level prior to painting or staining with the sand additive. Refinished an eighty year old porch this way to pristine.

    #542299
    GW_Justice
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    If you want a permanent non-slip surface (the paint will wear off eventually) you could use a 4 in. diamond blade to cut grooves like you see in road pavement. I have used an angle grinder to cut small amounts of concrete by hand, I think a grooved surface wouldn’t be too hard to do, and the blades are $15- 20 bucks.

    #542300

    D2DKL_TOSU98
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    Look into applying epoxy to the floor. It’s really not terribly difficult and you can add A non skid additive to the epoxy that makes it safe. Heres a link to get you an idea of what I’m talking about. Epoxy floor DIY

    #542301
    groundrules
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    If you go the coating route, like any painting project, prep is key. especially so with epoxy, since it’s pretty expensive and will bubble unless quite clean and dry at the time of application. Follow the prep instructions meticulously.

    If it’s a small area, what about just a big rubber mat?

    If you really want to grind the surface, I would try to minimize the amount of material you remove. I think cutting grooves will be overkill and cause you problems later. That toothed monstrosity on a hand tool would be a nightmare. And i think the wire flail will not be terribly effective.

    My two cents, but attempt at your own risk: Angle grinder is the tool for this if you really want to do it by hand. Use a carbide cup wheel like THIS. Angle grinder will spin the cutting tool roughly parallel to the surface which is safer than a drill which will spin it at 90 degrees, bouncing that thing around and sending chips up instead of out.

    If it’s a big area, the tool to use is a scarifier or scabbler, but that would really best be done by a pro. Ohio Concrete and Drilling is a good outfit I’ve used (although not for scarifying, but for cutting and coring).

    #542302
    Manatee
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    Groundrules said– If it’s a small area, what about just a big rubber mat?

    I concur.

    I think your choices here are: Tim the Toolman overkill just for fun (powertools, grinders, angled carbide diamond-bit etc), or just slap some gritty coating down and get on with it.

    That said, in a parallel universe, porch paint is a beverage to me. The stuff is hardcore. Mix some grit up in there, choose a crazy color that makes you happy.

    I am a total painting nerd– it should be in the DSMV– so that’s my vote.

    My favorite porch paint floor I ever painted, I used the stuff on linoleum (a no-no for sure). I scuffed the lino with a hand-sander first, then washed it with TSP. I matched it to the color of green tea powder, brilliant jade green. I dragged my fridge and stove across it umpteen times, no scratches.

    Plus with porch paint (also known as deck paint), I have a fetish for anything that may be used on sailboats.

    Sorry to be so excited about your garage floor. I like paint.

    #542303
    Alex Silbajoris
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    I’ll paint it, that’ll be the safest and most practical way to go.

    I put sand in the front porch paint many years ago, and it has worked well, but with later coats the grit gets covered and rounded off a bit. But it still isn’t slick.

    Last year for the first time I tried textured spray paint, on faded/scratched big plastic flowerpots, and I liked the result. I still have some left; I could “test on inconspicuous area” to see how it likes the concrete.

    But, first I have to wait for that slab to warm up. I’ll do this in hotter weather.

    Thanks for the tips, all.

    #542304
    groundrules
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    alexs said:

    Last year for the first time I tried textured spray paint, on faded/scratched big plastic flowerpots, and I liked the result. I still have some left; I could “test on inconspicuous area” to see how it likes the concrete.

    along those lines, I would go for a bed liner paint (as in truck bed). It can be had in spray or roll-on varieties, is super tough, and is meant to be non-slip by design.

    #542305
    groundrules
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    They also make specialty purpose anti-slip paints/floor coatings, which might be another way to go. Especially if you want more of an epoxy or enamel instead of some regular latex shit.

    It’s like 125 bucks a gallon though!

    #542306

    goldenidea
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    Prior to painting you might consider cleaning and etching the floor surface with either muriatic or hydrofluoric acid. That would likely make the paint bond better to the concrete. Be careful handling these acids if you do this. Be sure to keep the garage door open.

    #542307
    Alex Silbajoris
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    I thought about acid, but anything I apply would have to be removed somehow and I don’t want to flush it down the driveway to the gutter, said the guy who runs a watershed group.

    Maybe a wet-mop followed by a nice stinky vinegar rinse.

    #542308

    goldenidea
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    don’t want to flush it down the driveway to the gutter

    Perhaps neutralize the acid by spreading a liquefied powdered lime across the surface prior to wash off? Let sit for awhile then wash off with plenty of water to dilute it?

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