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Coyotes roam Ohio cities, suburbs

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This topic contains 72 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by lazyfish lazyfish 1 year, 9 months ago.

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  • #74690
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
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    From the Cincinnati Enquirer via AP

    CINCINNATI — As coyotes attack pets in residential areas, more towns and villages are encouraging police officers and deer hunters to shoot the predators.

    The coyote population around Cincinnati has grown significantly in the past two decades, said Todd Haines, a district manager for the Ohio Division of Wildlife.

    http://dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2008/12/26/z-apoh_coyotes25.ART_ART_12-26-08_C3_VGCBHCI.html?sid=101

    anyone else have any coyote sightings in Columbus? I’ve seen them south of town along Alum Creek drive, heard the stories that they are in Whetstone Park and on the West Campus Farm. My dear mother in UA is terrified her overly well fed cat will become coyote chow. :shock: She claims she saw one early in the morning and now the poor cat can’t go outside unsupervized.

    #247803

    catnfiddle
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    Not exact sightings in our neighborhood, but our entire population of stray cats vanished VERY quickly about two years ago.

    #247804

    Rockmastermike
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    yes. There have been coyotees around for several years. I’ve seen them in the wooded area near riverside hospital at 315. And have seen that there has been active predation on stray cats in the grandview area. (also a LOT of sudden “lost cat” posters, unfortunately).

    The coyotes provide a helpful service and should NOT be killed.

    If people are worried about their pets, please keep them supervised when outside. It’s a dangerous world for pets anyway even if the coyotes don’t get them, some dumbass in a car will.

    #247805
    AmyD
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    we had one on our patio last spring. it loped away over the hill. it seemed bewildered.

    #247806
    Coremodels
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    Rockmastermike wrote The coyotes provide a helpful service and should NOT be killed.

    I agree. I never have liked cats much :P

    #247807
    chaptal
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    Years ago there were coyotes at the deaf school at Morse and Indianola.

    #247808
    Bear
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    lazyfish wrote From the Cincinnati Enquirer via AP

    CINCINNATI — As coyotes attack pets in residential areas, more towns and villages are encouraging police officers and deer hunters to shoot the predators.

    :) Nooo!

    #247809
    brothermarcus
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    Northwest of Hilliard is always thick with them

    #247810

    KSquared
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    Rockmastermike wrote yes. There have been coyotees around for several years. I’ve seen them in the wooded area near riverside hospital at 315. And have seen that there has been active predation on stray cats in the grandview area. (also a LOT of sudden “lost cat” posters, unfortunately).

    The coyotes provide a helpful service and should NOT be killed.

    If people are worried about their pets, please keep them supervised when outside. It’s a dangerous world for pets anyway even if the coyotes don’t get them, some dumbass in a car will.

    I agree Rockmaster. Wiping out all other predators isn’t healthy for the ecosystem, as we can see when the deer population explodes. It’s all about balance and quite honestly, nature would not be kind to many of the animals we keep as pets, at least not according to what I’ve read.

    #247811

    jfellrath
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    When I lived in some of the apartments on Stelzer Road between the airport and Easton, my wife and I saw a coyote prowling about one late night out there. That was in either 2001 or 2002.

    #247812
    Tigertree
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    Right, but how is the government involved?

    #247813

    michaelcoyote
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    Bear wrote
    lazyfish wrote From the Cincinnati Enquirer via AP

    CINCINNATI — As coyotes attack pets in residential areas, more towns and villages are encouraging police officers and deer hunters to shoot the predators.

    :) Nooo!

    http://img255.imageshack.us/img255/4413/coyoteee8.jpg

    I think i’m fine as long as i stay away from Cincinnati.. which is generally a good idea anyway…

    #247814
    Manatee
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    Coyotes and all other top-of-the-foodchain predators provide indispensable ecological services to everyone, free of charge. These animals should be perceived almost as royalty, celebrated and supported. It is a very good sign that their numbers are increasing.

    I have even heard coyotes have been interbreeding with what’s left of our native wolves.

    One of the most bone-chilling, awe-inspiring sounds I have ever heard was in the middle of the night, way out in Bainbridge: we all awoke to the ululations of a countless number of coyotes howling. Right out of dreamland, this can really put you in your place. A primal force like looking at ocean breakers. Let me tell you, the covers got pulled up a little higher around the ears that night.

    #247815
    gramarye
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    Rockmastermike wrote If people are worried about their pets, please keep them supervised when outside. It’s a dangerous world for pets anyway even if the coyotes don’t get them, some dumbass in a car will.

    This was a constant worry out in the country, but people let (or kept) their pets outside anyway. It did mean the occasional cat or dog got hit by a car, but it happened a lot less often than you might think. Both of our cats were outdoor cats; both died of old age.

    I agree. I never have liked cats much

    The devil is building a special chamber in Hell for you, right next to the ones for those who leave their cell phones on and actually answer them at the movie theater and poisonously saccharin summer camp counselors.

    KSquared wrote I agree Rockmaster. Wiping out all other predators isn’t healthy for the ecosystem, as we can see when the deer population explodes. It’s all about balance …

    There’s no help for it, sooner or later. I believe this part of the article got omitted from the quote here:

    Coyotes migrated to Ohio from the West and have thrived in a state where they have no natural predators.

    (Emphasis added.)

    In other words, even if the overriding consideration is balance, not extermination, we’re still going to end up killing at least some; the difference is between “some” (i.e., treating a certain population level as a good thing) and “as many as possible, hopefully all” (i.e., treating it like the ash borer or other pests). Importing other natural predators to keep the coyote population down is likely not going to be a serious option: coyotes’ natural predators include alligators, wolves, cougars, and mountain lions. It would be hard to support any stable population of alligators in Ohio; cougars and mountain lions would simply never attain the required numbers. Wolves would be a solution worse than the problem.

    #247816

    Rockmastermike
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    gramarye wrote

    In other words, even if the overriding consideration is balance, not extermination, we’re still going to end up killing at least some; the difference is between “some” (i.e., treating a certain population level as a good thing) and “as many as possible, hopefully all” (i.e., treating it like the ash borer or other pests). Importing other natural predators to keep the coyote population down is likely not going to be a serious option

    What we were talking about is that, while coyotes are not native predators, they are a reasonable replacement for the predator populations that no longer exist here. We need SOME kind of meso-predator. Foxes would be better, but their populations have been slower to recover. I’ll take coyotes if that’s all we can get.

    Yes, the coyote population will eventually require control. We are nowhere near that point yet.

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