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8 Steps to A Pain-Free Back

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Everyday Chit Chat 8 Steps to A Pain-Free Back

This topic contains 5 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by Manatee Manatee 7 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #81742
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    So I just recently sustained a fairly bad injury to my back– not sure what it is exactly, but I’ve narrowed it down to somewhere between my upper lumbar and sacroliliac. It was manifesting excruciating pain in my hip, so much so that I haven’t been able to walk. I’ve been to the doctor and all that, but what’s really been blowing my mind are these books my friend recently lent me— my favorite one by far is called 8 Steps to A Pain-Free Back, by Esther Gokhale, L.Ac.

    It mostly has to do with something most of us probably find pretty boring– posture– but it’s one of the most useful books I’ve ever read, and quite fun to look at as well. The author uses beautiful photos, both historical and modern, from around the world, to show correct posture in every day activities. Holding correct posture as you go about your business builds in the muscle structure and proper flexibility we all need to maintain an erect carriage and full range of motion as we get older, even into our 90’s. It’s particularly indicated for people who have mysterious, chronic pain that never goes away, like fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome.

    The author’s thesis is that when most people worked with their bodies all day long, it was natural to assume certain positions during work that were most advantageous for properly distributing the stress of work around the bones and ligaments. Historical art and photographs on the whole show good posture. Then with the advent of modern times, sometime around the 20’s it became fashionable to slouch, or to sway the lower back excessively– just think of how fashion models stand. The bones are no longer “stacked” to properly distribute weight.

    Examples of well-stacked posture

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    It’s a little-known fact that about 95% of back injuries resolve themselves over time, with no intrusive measures taken. By using this book, I’ve been able to begin healing my back in a week’s time, without using the prescription painkillers or steroidal anti-inflammatories I was given. I used small amounts of ibuprofen here and there. And I now know how to sit, stand, bend over, lay down, walk, and stretch correctly.

    It turns out I’ve been standing with my back overly swayed, my knees locked, my shoulders slumped, and on my toes for most of my life. After doing several weeks of hard physical labor recently, I felt really great. I could feel my body carriage realigning and centering itself, and I got visibly taller and thinner, and could stand up straighter. But then I had an unfortunate accident stepping knee-deep in a gopher hole of all things— and really threw my back out. Thank goodness I had this book to ameliorate the pain and help me build good habits for the rest of my life. I can’t recommend it highly enough for those with chronic back or body pain!

    #371863

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    Manatee wrote >> But then I had an unfortunate accident stepping knee-deep in a gopher hole of all things— and really threw my back out.

    OUCH! I’ve done that, torqued my knee pretty good (knees are my weak link).

    Hope you feel better soon.

    #371864
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Rockmastermike wrote >>

    Manatee wrote >> But then I had an unfortunate accident stepping knee-deep in a gopher hole of all things— and really threw my back out.

    OUCH! I’ve done that, torqued my knee pretty good (knees are my weak link).
    Hope you feel better soon.

    Indeed. Back problems are no fun at all. Heal up soon!

    #371865
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    I’m glad you are okay!

    I think my posture could use some work.

    #371866
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Thanks for the well-wishes guys :)

    And yeah… check this book out of the library or buy it if you have real back issues, or just want a fun “instruction manual” for how to have a spine.

    It turns out what a lot of us think of as “standing up straight”
    is also pretty bad for our spines.

    The friend that lent this to me has a herniated disk or two and this method has enabled her to live pain-free.

    The main reason I mentioned this at all is because back issues can be so mystifying, costly, and painful— and sometimes they can’t seem to be cured at all no matter what is tried.

    #371867

    Tenzo
    Participant

    The best back exercizes I have found anywhere were the ones we warmed up with in a University Modern Dance course. Minimum 30 minutes of warm up before dancing. Plus the dancing loosened and stengthened core muscles. Take a look at the dancers out there and the muscle definition.

    I took the class at Northwestern as an elective for a Divinity degree. I was 35 at the time and was the only one over 19 and the only male in the class.

    One of my best University courses EVER.

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