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Columbus Public Art Installations

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Art & Artists Columbus Public Art Installations

This topic contains 36 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by  joev 2 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 37 total)
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  • #478545
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    jpizzow said:
    Too big? Yea, probably too big. You get the idea.

    Would definitely send a message to Franklinton residents. ;)

    #478546

    columbusmike
    Participant

    Halt! I command thee to stop from entering the city of Franklinton/Columbus and take a look at our newly dam-less river :)

    #478547

    News
    Participant

    CAP UP Window Art Displays Unveiled, Winners Announced
    Published on September 27, 2012 11:30 am
    By: Walker

    The latest Downtown public artwork display was launched on Tuesday evening as the CAP UP project was officially unveiled. Ten storefront windows were converted into temporary sidewalk-facing galleries where local artists have installed three dimensional displays that celebrate 200Columbus, the city’s bicentennial.

    READ MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/cap-up-window-art-displays-unveiled-winners-announced

    #478548
    Rusty1
    Rusty1
    Participant

    I think Ive seen a few paintings on bldg walls none of them really stood out, this was an eye catcher though.

    #478549

    News
    Participant

    New Public Artwork Installed in Downtown Alley
    Published on October 12, 2012 12:15 pm
    By: Walker

    The installation of public art in Downtown Columbus has been on a roll in 2012 thanks to the Finding Time project, which includes temporary pieces such as Plein Air, the Bicentennial Towers and Columbus Never….

    READ MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/new-public-artwork-installed-in-downtown-alley

    #478550

    futureman
    Participant

    The floating cows are real!

    Red, abstract cow sculptures seem to graze atop Scioto River
    By Amy Saunders
    The Columbus Dispatch Wednesday July 3, 2013 8:44 AM

    Red, White & Boom attendees, let us settle the debate: Those are cows floating on the Scioto River.

    People staking out fireworks spots at North Bank Park yesterday were intrigued but confused by the new steel sculptures.

    “You know WaterFire?” said Trisha Kearns, 37, of Commercial Point, referring to the summertime bonfire events on the river. “I’m pretty sure that’s what they’re for.”

    “There’s a rhinoceros at the end; that’s some kind of cat,” said Tracy Sullivan, 40, of Grove City, pointing to the red sculptures near the opposite bank. “Maybe that’s a water buffalo.”

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2013/07/03/red-abstract-cow-sculptures-seem-to-graze-atop-scioto-river.html

    #478551
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    This is my father’s sculpture –for the Streetcar District, at the corner of Livingston and Nelson Roads. It was installed earlier this year.

    There’s also a series of great murals by various local artists celebrating the District all along Livingston traveling towards downtown. They aren’t large so you have to look carefully for them, but some of them are really stellar.

    #478552

    News
    Participant

    Press Release:
    Grazing Now on Display Near North Bank Park: Artful Cows Floating on the Scioto River This Summer

    Columbus artist Tim Rietenbach imagined the continuous movement of the Scioto River as time passing — a fluid “field” for his installation of six double-life-size cows grazing on the surface of the water across from North Bank Park in Downtown Columbus. Using steel rod, Rietenbach created the outlines of these representations of Columbus’s agrarian past. Grazing is one of 12 projects comprising Finding Time: Columbus Public Art 2012. Grazing will be on view through the summer. Permit delays caused the project to be installed this summer instead of in 2012 as it had been scheduled.

    Each cow sculpture is mounted on an anchored, submerged flotation device. The steel rod is covered with red plastic tubing that will help the sculptures stand out against the background of the Scioto River’s tree-lined shore and to heighten the improbability of the floating herd. Both the image and the subtle motion of the sculptures on the river speak to slowing down, and to some extent, defying the progression of time. The cows, even in this displaced incarnation, conjure a time when farms were smaller and cows roamed fields in close proximity to downtown. Rietenbach’s project may be interpreted as a drawing of the ghosts of Columbus’s past grazing contentedly at the heart of the city’s revitalized riverfront.

    Rietenbach is a professor at Columbus College of Art & Design. His large-scale installation work has earned him several grants from the Ohio Arts Council and the Greater Columbus Arts Council. Gigantic, his 100-foot-long sculpture of a human skeleton, is permanently installed at COSI Columbus.

    Grazing is one of 12 projects that comprised Finding Time: Columbus Public Art 2012, which took place in public spaces, plazas, parks, streets, and alleys throughout the downtown during the bicentennial year and beyond. The program transformed downtown into an open-air gallery with temporary public art projects by more than 50 international, national, and local artists. Reflecting the broad range of contemporary public art in multiple forms and media, projects ranged from the familiar—sculpture and murals—to unexpected installations, sound works, and performances in non-traditional sites, including COTA buses and church bells. These site-specific artworks explored the physical and philosophical measurement of time, generating questions on the notion of time, passing of time, use of time, measurement of time, world time, and the notion of temporary and permanent.

    The primary supporter for Grazing is the Crane Group. All sponsors, partners, and collaborators for Finding Time: Columbus Public Art 2012 are available at http://www.ColumbusPublicArt.com. Artist information and more details are also available on the website.

    #478553

    News
    Participant

    Press Release:
    Two Finding Time: Columbus Public Art 2012 Projects Recognized in Nation’s Top 50 Public Art Projects by Americans for the Arts

    “Buckle” by Candace Black and by “inside out: As the Stars Viewed the Palace” by Nikhil Chopra — public artworks commissioned by Finding Time: Columbus Public Art 2012 — have been named as two of the 50 best public art projects by the 2013 Public Art Network Year in Review by Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts. The annual Year in Review program recognizes the most exemplary, innovative, permanent or temporary public artworks created or debuted in the previous year. The 2013 Year in Review awards were chosen from more than 350 submissions from across the United States.

    Three independent public art experts — John Carson, artist and head of Carnegie Mellon University School of Fine Art, Norie Sato, artist, and Justine Topfer, project manager, San Francisco Arts Commission and private curator — juried the 2013 Year in Review. Their selections were announced on June 13 at the Americans for the Arts Public Art conference in Pittsburgh. The artists and commissioning organizations involved in creating and supporting these public art works received letters of congratulations and certificates from Americans for the Arts.

    Last fall, Black created and installed “Buckle,” a work of warped architecture, on Lynn Street between High and Third streets. Her inspiration for “Buckle” was working with a historic building and the architectural details of the Huntington Building on High Street. She focused on recreating the dentils: a series of closely spaced, rectangular blocks that form a molding that usually projects below the cornice along the roofline of a building. To create “Buckle,” Black made a rubber mold of the “teeth,” cast it in wax, and then warmed it so that the dentils would warp and fall with gravity. Black then made mold of the altered “teeth” and cast them in a frozen state of white plaster.

    Indian artist Nikhil Chopra returned to Columbus last August for a 78-hour tour-de-force public performance: “inside out: As the Stars Viewed the Palace.” While costumed, Chopra silently drew on a portion of a 48’ x 132’ exterior wall of the Palace Theatre in Downtown Columbus. “As the Stars Viewed the Palace” is the title of a 1940s photograph of the Palace Theatre, taken from the stage looking out toward an empty theater. By reinterpreting the photo in large scale on the building exterior, Chopra juxtaposed the perspectives of inside/outside, performer/audience, time/space, and reality/illusion. Made of charcoal, “inside out: As the stars viewed the Palace” was on view for a few months, fading and disappearing eventually due to exposure to the elements.

    “The awards hold special meaning for me,” said Finding Time Program Director Malcolm Cochran, “in that both Black and Chopra are former students of the OSU Department of Art.” Columbus native Black has both a BFA and MFA degrees from OSU. She credits her interest in working with plaster to courses she took in ceramics as an undergraduate and to her employment on the crew that restored the intricate plaster ceiling of the Great Southern Theater. Indian-born Chopra came to OSU as a graduate student in painting, but his work culminated in a tableau vivant in which he dressed as a Raj from the time of his grandfather. Chopra considers OSU the launching pad for a career of performing and exhibiting worldwide, and he was pleased to return to Columbus for this project ten years after having graduated.

    Finding Time: Columbus Public Art 2012 took place in public spaces, plazas, parks, streets, and alleys throughout the downtown during Columbus’s bicentennial year and beyond. The program transformed downtown into an open-air gallery with temporary public art projects by more than 50 international, national, and local artists. Reflecting the broad range of contemporary public art in multiple forms and media, projects ranged from the familiar—sculpture and murals—to unexpected installations, sound works, and performances in non-traditional sites, including COTA buses and church bells. These site-specific artworks explored the physical and philosophical measurement of time, generating questions on the notion of time, passing of time, use of time, measurement of time, world time, and the notion of temporary and permanent.

    “By creating a sense of identity of places we inhabit, public art makes an enduring impact on our lives,” said Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. “We congratulate the artists and commissioning groups of the 13th annual Public Art Year in Review and look forward for honoring more great works in the coming years.”

    Since 2000, the Public Art Network Year in Review has annually recognized outstanding public art projects through an open call submission and juror selection process. The Year in Review program is the only national award that specifically recognizes public art projects. For complete list of selected projects: http://www.artsusa.org/networks/public_art_network/people_projects.asp.

    All sponsors, partners, and collaborators for Finding Time: Columbus Public Art 2012 are available at http://www.ColumbusPublicArt.com. Artist information and more details are also available on the website.

    #478554

    News
    Participant

    Last Chance to see Cows Grazing in the Scioto River
    Published on October 23, 2013 3:50 pm
    By: Walker

    It’s nearly 2014, but some of the public art pieces from 2012′s Finding Time series are still on display for a little bit longer. The five red wireframe cow sculptures that make up Tim Rietenbach’s “Grazing” installation will be coming out of the river near North Bank Park this weekend, which gives you only a few days left to see them in person.

    READ MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/last-chance-to-see-cows-grazing-in-the-scioto-river

    #478555

    News
    Participant

    Columbus Establishes New Public Art Program
    Published on February 4, 2014 1:20 pm
    By: Walker

    Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman signed an executive order today to establish the new Columbus Public Art Program, which will allocate a minimum of $250,000 per year to public art projects.

    READ MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/columbus-establishes-new-public-art-program

    #1020707

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    BLOOMS ON BUTTLES: PUBLIC ART PROJECT IN THE SHORT NORTH ARTS DISTRICT

    Blooms on Buttles is a public art project dedicated to John Angelo, former Director of the Short North Business Association, Short North Special Improvement District, and Short North Alliance.

    The Buttles Blooms consist of 18 stainless steel and resin blooming sculptures designed by artist Mark Lagergren of Tork Works Industrial ARTifacts. Serving as a gateway from Goodale Park to the Short North Arts District, the sculptures will be installed in planters that line Buttles Avenue between Park Street and High Street. The stainless steel and colorful resin shapes will catch light uniquely throughout the day and will illuminate the street with dancing rays of color.

    The Short North Alliance anticipates that the project will be installed in early spring 2015, pending approval from the Columbus Art Commission and Victorian Village Commission.

    http://www.shortnorth.org/publicart

    #1020736

    Lu
    Participant

    This is cool. Is it permanent or temporary? The article doesn’t say, unless I missed it.

    #1020740

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    This is cool. Is it permanent or temporary? The article doesn’t say, unless I missed it.

    I believe it would be permanent, but I’m not positive on that.

    #1020757
    King Gambrinus
    King Gambrinus
    Participant

    I think that’s really cool and based on what they’re trying to raise it better be permanent. But I would think they could do maybe every other planter, cut the cost in half and still leave some greenery.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 37 total)

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