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Demolition of Settlement House Leaves Another Empty Lot on South Side

Brent Warren Brent Warren Demolition of Settlement House Leaves Another Empty Lot on South Side
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City crews have taken down the main structure at 310 E. Innis Ave., where the South Side Settlement House stood for over 30 years. Dave Bush, Columbus assistant finance director, explains that while there is still some work to be done (the ornamental stairwell is to be saved and moved into storage, and the lot will be back-filled and seeded with grass), the main part of the demolition is now complete.

As for what the future holds for the site, Bush says there are no concrete plans, but “the City will certainly be working with neighborhoods and stakeholders of the area to best determine its future.” He notes two projects in the immediate vicinity of the settlement house site that the city hopes will bring new life to the area; the John R. Maloney Family and Wellness Center, which is currently under construction at the corner of Barthman and Parsons Avenues, and the former Reeb Avenue Elementary, which the city now owns and would like to turn into a community-services hub for the neighborhood.

CLICK HERE for more news and updates on South Side redevelopment.

Demolition photos taken throughout February and March by Walker Evans and Anne Evans.

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10 Responses to Demolition of Settlement House Leaves Another Empty Lot on South Side

  1. leftovers March 11, 2013 8:28 am at 8:28 am

    Here is a Dispatch article briefly telling what the South Side Settlement House was, why it closed and why they tore down the building.

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2012/05/03/home-of-shuttered-charity-to-open-just-for-farewells.html

  2. michow March 11, 2013 9:36 am at 9:36 am

    Here are some photos just after completion of construction, I believe.

    http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/hodgettsfung/southside.html

  3. Walker Evans
    Walker March 11, 2013 10:22 am at 10:22 am

    Such an odd looking building. Anyone know who the architect was?

  4. mrmann March 11, 2013 10:38 am at 10:38 am

    Studio Works: Robert Mangurian and design partner: Craig Hodgetts, now of Hodgetts + Fung
    1980

  5. SusanB
    SusanB March 11, 2013 11:31 am at 11:31 am

    It is a shame that the SSSH is no more. But green space is not a bad thing. The houses are pretty close together on the South Side and more trees would be a very good thing. A community garden would be very nice as well.

  6. rory March 11, 2013 11:46 am at 11:46 am

    That was a pretty interesting building. I should have to gone the south side more often. It’s too bad it was at that 30-50 year old sweet spot age for demolition.

  7. heresthecasey March 11, 2013 12:48 pm at 12:48 pm

    Such a shame to lose this building. And all we have to show for it now is another empty lot with “no concrete plans at this time.”

    Deplorable.

  8. jpfilthy March 12, 2013 1:33 pm at 1:33 pm

    We took a field trip to just to see this building as a student in the University of Cincinnati Architecture program. It’s a complete shame to lose this gem. I would have protested if I still lived in the area.

  9. Alex March 18, 2013 1:35 pm at 1:35 pm

    Pretty amazing structure. Here are some more pictures:

    https://ksamedia.osu.edu/work/44351

  10. DavidJGill January 27, 2016 2:58 pm at 2:58 pm

    “WAY TO GO OHIO”
    Pathetic. As a native of Ohio I’m sorry to say my home state never fails to disappoint, embitter and anger me.
    “I WENT BACK TO OHIO
    BUT MY CITY WAS GONE”
    Ohio loves to tear down buildings and on every occasion demolition has enthusiastic stakeholders in Ohio, while preservation has few. Those arguing for preservation, for not throwing away something useful just because a new use has not yet presented itself, are portrayed as unrealistic do-gooders.

    “BY A GOVERNMENT THAT HAD NO PRIDE”
    The new mantra of city officials in declining rust belt America is to chuck potential blight ASAP and pave the way for property developers to cash in on new anti-urban strip malls and third rate housing. Preservation and adaptive reuse, if it doesn’t fit a developer’s rigid ROI formula, goes out the window fast. And cities want tax revenue – not character, history and meaning. The city of Columbus moved fast to get rid of this one.

    “MY CITY HAD BEEN PULLED DOWN”
    The architects were Venice California based Studioworks (Mangurian + Hodgetts, 1980) who designed this building in intimate collaboration with the Settlement House’s users. It cleverly used modest materials to make grand spaces – it was ennobling on the cheap and it exceeded expectations. And it came out of that weird, searching period of postmodernism in architecture that gave us many buildings that haven’t really worn well aesthetically, many of which we might like to demolish, but tragically, South Side Settlement was not one of those – it was one we should have kept.

    The Pretenders saw this coming a long time ago….

    “I WENT BACK TO OHIO
    BUT MY CITY WAS GONE
    THERE WAS NO TRAIN STATION
    THERE WAS NO DOWNTOWN
    SOUTH HOWARD HAD DISAPPEARED
    ALL MY FAVORITE PLACES
    MY CITY HAD BEEN PULLED DOWN
    REDUCED TO PARKING SPACES
    A, O, WAY TO GO OHIO
    WELL I WENT BACK TO OHIO
    BUT MY FAMILY WAS GONE
    I STOOD ON THE BACK PORCH
    THERE WAS NOBODY HOME
    I WAS STUNNED AND AMAZED
    MY CHILDHOOD MEMORIES
    SLOWLY SWIRLED PAST
    LIKE THE WIND THROUGH THE TREES
    A, O, OH WAY TO GO OHIO
    I WENT BACK TO OHIO
    BUT MY PRETTY COUNTRYSIDE
    HAD BEEN PAVED DOWN THE MIDDLE
    BY A GOVERNMENT THAT HAD NO PRIDE
    THE FARMS OF OHIO
    HAD BEEN REPLACED BY SHOPPING MALLS
    AND MUZAK FILLED THE AIR
    FROM SENECA TO CUYAHOGA FALLS
    SAID, A, O, OH WAY TO GO OHIO”

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