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City moving on plan to raze public-housing projects

Walker Evans Walker Evans City moving on plan to raze public-housing projects
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The Dispatch wrote City moving on plan to raze housing projects

Saturday, November 15, 2008

BY RITA PRICE

The first wave of a massive relocation project for public-housing residents likely will begin in the spring. Federal housing officials have approved most of the Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authority’s five-year plan to tear down the city’s oldest and largest public-housing communities.

Dennis Guest, CMHA executive director, still awaits final word that the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will provide enough Section 8 vouchers for residents to rent on the private market. HUD also wants CMHA to first offer two large complexes, Lincoln Park and Marion Square, for sale.

The move away from publicly owned housing is playing out across the nation as housing authorities are starved of the money they need to maintain and repair properties.

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  • Walker

  • Cyclist

    Sayers Towers are pretty big buildings. I’m gonna miss house pyramid-topped asterisks!

  • peanutnozone

    Before I was acquainted with the neighborhoods of Columbus, I always thought those two apartment buildings in the bottoms were cool looking. If I had the money, I’d re-do them.

  • manchild

    I actually like those towers too. I just wish they weren’t PJs. Couldn’t they be converted into something else?

  • CDS sherman

    well sunshine is in the process as we speak of being gutted and preped for the wrecking ball. riverside bradley is one if the worst and unsafe housing projects in the city. i was told from CMHA that riverside was where all the folks who couldnt make it in other housing units were put. my place is half a block away and gunfire is a daily issue for the residents and myself. the place isnt safe for anyone to live, the structures are decent i will admit but i think the location will become prime in years to come and the city has plans for the area in its overlay. i also know that the land could be for sale if the right development were presented. with the 40 million + bridge coming to completion next year riverside only stands in the way. i was not given a date

    as to when riverside will be razed but it couldnt come soon enough. its time to rethink public housing and spread the density around.

  • CDS sherman

    manchild wrote I actually like those towers too. I just wish they weren’t PJs. Couldn’t they be converted into something else?

    pj’s….. real funny…. :roll:

  • UrbanApplachian

    I knew it was just a matter of time before Riverside-Bradley would be torn down. There’s just no way that the new bridge would be allowed to connect some of the city’s most wealthy with some of it’s poorest. I wish the Sunshine Terrace building were renovated, I’ll almost miss it.

  • Ndcent

    CDS sherman wrote
    manchild wrote I actually like those towers too. I just wish they weren’t PJs. Couldn’t they be converted into something else?

    pj’s….. real funny…. :roll:

    I don’t get it.

  • gramarye

    Ndcent wrote
    CDS sherman wrote
    manchild wrote I actually like those towers too. I just wish they weren’t PJs. Couldn’t they be converted into something else?

    pj’s….. real funny…. :roll:

    I don’t get it.

    Me neither.

  • Mercurius

    The old Eddie Murphy claymation show about the projects?

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0182621/

  • coolbuckeye

    I will be interested in observing the execution of the relocation of individuals and families. Isn’t there already a long wait list for section 8? I don’t object to reducing the concentration of low income housing downtown. But the people have to go somewhere what community will welcome more section 8 into their neighborhood? I have some serious reservations about next steps after the buildings are demolished.

  • CDS sherman

    well as some of the burbs or just some of the outer reaches of the city become more vacant and “PJ ish”. alot of opportunity for section 8 subsidized housing will start to open up if it hasn’t already. also they will rebuild new and improved facilities on most of those lots im sure. for instance jenkins tower on e broad and worly terrace on w broad. both were demolished and rebuilt as 3 story brick buildings. and they look abit more attractive.

    BTW did anyone catch the crazy shooting at sawyer towers last night….. we had a bad one a few weeks ago at riverside involving a young women carrying her child. she was shot through her back and the child ended up with the bullet lodged in his leg. very scary and very real stuff. and there was another shooting at riverside last night, nobody was hit but i heard the gunfire as i do every night just about.

  • Outerloop

    What does P J stand for?

  • Walker

    coolbuckeye wrote But the people have to go somewhere what community will welcome more section 8 into their neighborhood?

    It sounds like they will be getting vouchers to rent on the private market. So I guess it would be up to a landlord’s discretion on whether or not to rent to people using those vouchers, right? I’m not really too well read on this topic, so I don’t know how much leeway they have with being able to discriminate against this type of renter applying for a unit somewhere. But I really don’t think it will be a matter of communities or neighborhoods making decisions on whether or not they want to open their arms to these displaced tenants.

    I’m sure many leaving these buildings will move to specific inner-city areas where cheap rent can traditionally be found, but I don’t think it’s any secret that cheap rent can be found just about everywhere. Perhaps we will see more headed towards suburban areas of the city. For anyone interested in jobs, that’s where a lot of them are.

  • Mercurius

    Outerloop wrote What does P J stand for?

    Mercurius wrote The old Eddie Murphy claymation show about the projects

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0182621/

  • JimSweeney

    UrbanApplachian wrote I knew it was just a matter of time before Riverside-Bradley would be torn down. There’s just no way that the new bridge would be allowed to connect some of the city’s most wealthy with some of it’s poorest.

    bingo. sherm is a genius. :shock:

  • Cyclist

    Mercurius wrote
    Outerloop wrote What does P J stand for?

    Mercurius wrote The old Eddie Murphy claymation show about the projects

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0182621/

    That show was rad. Murphy also did Mr. Robinson’s Neighborhood on SNL.

  • dru

    Outerloop wrote What does P J stand for?

    ProJect

  • Cyclist

    Fresh out the ‘jects, tell the chicks where the cheese at.

  • lin

    Sadly, the dismantling of public housing projects can actually cause crime to spike because it allows gangs to spread out to communities that are unprepared to deal with them. There is also a social cost for the residents who move out of public housing- people are removed from familiar social networks, and distanced from services. There was an excellent article on this in a recent Atlantic.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200807/memphis-crime

  • somertimeoh

    Walker wrote It sounds like they will be getting vouchers to rent on the private market. So I guess it would be up to a landlord’s discretion on whether or not to rent to people using those vouchers, right? I’m not really too well read on this topic, so I don’t know how much leeway they have with being able to discriminate against this type of renter applying for a unit somewhere. But I really don’t think it will be a matter of communities or neighborhoods making decisions on whether or not they want to open their arms to these displaced tenants.

    I don’t know how they do it here, but in Dallas none of the mega-complexes would accept Section 8 and the “inner-city” was being redeveloped and gentrified creating a need for low income housing. So the TXHA, I’m assuming with HUD assistance, came in and forced certain properties in those areas to accept “project-based” vouchers, capped at a certain % of the units. The next time my lease came up after my complex was “chosen” I didn’t renew. I left a brand new complex where I was the only one who’d ever lived in my apt for an older complex across the street because I quickly grew tired of the BS that came with my new neighbors. I’m sure there are exceptions where a community can absorb and no one knows the difference, but with my experience it’s a situation I would not want to find myself in again.

  • osulew

    I worked in property management for a few years in college. Those with section 8 vouchers cannot rent at any complex they choose. They are restricted to a certain list of properties that have been approved to accept them. When working for Casto Communities, I did a short stint filling in at a property that accepted the vouchers. I was nervous at first, but the folks receiving these vouchers are actually held to strict standards of upkeep in their apartments and the communities must also maintain the units to a certain acceptable standard for both the resident and the community to continue to recieve the funding. We and the residents had regular inspections, and did have one resident lose their voucher for not keeping their apartment in an acceptable condition.

    With all that being said, you certainly won’t see any of the nicer suburban mega-compounds accepting these anytime soon.

    Although if the trend with swanky assisted living communities moving to being more accepting of income based Medicaid waivers during rough economic times, maybe the apartment market won’t be far behind.

    But what do I know, and now I’m rambling.

  • somertimeoh

    I’m sure inspecting apartments is high on the housing authority list of things to do.

  • berdawn

    osulew wrote

    Although if the trend with swanky assisted living communities moving to being more accepting of income based Medicaid waivers during rough economic times, maybe the apartment market won’t be far behind.

    I think they had to be forced to do that and the wait lists are HUGE.

  • osulew

    berdawn wrote
    osulew wrote

    Although if the trend with swanky assisted living communities moving to being more accepting of income based Medicaid waivers during rough economic times, maybe the apartment market won’t be far behind.

    I think they had to be forced to do that and the wait lists are HUGE.

    Communities still have the option of whether to accept the Medicaid waiver. The reimbursement to the communities is abyssmal, but for communities that are struggling, it beats having apartments sit completely vacant. The wait lists are huge though and the criteria for getting the waiver are ridiculous often eliminate those that would really be most appropriate for the program.

    I’ve derailed. Sorry.

  • http://www.columbusunderground.com Walker

    Public-housing complex, rec center to be gone by fall
    Friday,  May 8, 2009
    By Rita Price
    THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

    Heavy equipment sits in the parking lot at Sunshine Annex, ready to dismantle a big piece of the public-housing complex that has dominated McDowell Street for more than 40 years.

    The Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authority expects demolition of the 129-unit building and the adjacent McDowell Recreation Center to be completed by the end of September.

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