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Census shows how Columbus suburbs stack up

Walker Evans Walker Evans
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The Dispatch wrote Census shows how suburbs stack up

Tuesday, December 9, 2008

BY SHERRI WILLIAMS

Of the seven largest suburbs in Franklin County, Reynoldsburg is the most diverse and Upper Arlington is home to the most residents working from home.

Those highlights are in a census report being released today that focuses on midsize cities for the first time since the 2000 count. Today’s report covers cities with populations between 20,000 and 65,000 over a three-year average, 2005-07.

From now on, the information will be updated every year as part of the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, which has provided annual updates for larger cities.

READ MORE

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7 Responses to Census shows how Columbus suburbs stack up

  1. Walker Evans
    Walker December 9, 2008 12:01 pm at 12:01 pm

  2. Outerloop December 9, 2008 12:55 pm at 12:55 pm

    Wonder why Pickerington was not part of the survey? It would be interesting to compare Pick’s stats against Reynoldsburg’s since Pickerington has essentially sprawled from Reynoldsburg.

    I recall a Dispatch article a while back comparing west Reynoldsburg to east Reynoldsburg with a stark contrast between the two.

  3. Cyclist December 9, 2008 1:04 pm at 1:04 pm

    Outerloop wrote Wonder why Pickerington was not part of the survey? It would be interesting to compare Pick’s stats against Reynoldsburg’s since Pickerington has essentially sprawled from Reynoldsburg.

    I recall a Dispatch article a while back comparing west Reynoldsburg to east Reynoldsburg with a stark contrast between the two.

    They are comparing the 7 most populated suburbs. I don’t think Pickerington even makes the top 10. Bexley, Worthington, Whitehall, and Pataskala probably have more resident, plus some townships have their own populations.

  4. Walker Evans
    Walker December 9, 2008 1:27 pm at 1:27 pm

    Outerloop wrote Wonder why Pickerington was not part of the survey? It would be interesting to compare Pick’s stats against Reynoldsburg’s since Pickerington has essentially sprawled from Reynoldsburg.

    Looks like this survey only includes cities in Franklin County with a population of 20k+.

    Pickerington’s estimated population was 16,575 in 2006 and it’s mostly in Fairfield county.

  5. Cyclist December 9, 2008 2:13 pm at 2:13 pm

    Walker wrote
    Outerloop wrote Wonder why Pickerington was not part of the survey? It would be interesting to compare Pick’s stats against Reynoldsburg’s since Pickerington has essentially sprawled from Reynoldsburg.

    Looks like this survey only includes cities in Franklin County with a population of 20k+.

    Pickerington’s estimated population was 16,575 in 2006 and it’s mostly in Fairfield county.

    That would make it more populous than Worthington, Pataskala, Whitehall and Bexley.

    Maybe Pickerington is the 8th most populous suburb? But still majorly outside Franklin Co.

  6. gramarye
    gramarye December 9, 2008 2:26 pm at 2:26 pm

    It’s also still under 20,000.

    One of the reasons Columbus itself is so large is that our suburbs really aren’t that huge; Columbus got a lot of the “suburban” growth for itself. Had we followed Cincinnati and Cleveland’s development patterns, places like Minerva Park, Polaris, etc. would be suburbs of their own (or parts of even larger suburbs–note that Worthington didn’t make the list).

  7. Cyclist December 9, 2008 4:18 pm at 4:18 pm

    gramarye wrote It’s also still under 20,000.

    One of the reasons Columbus itself is so large is that our suburbs really aren’t that huge; Columbus got a lot of the “suburban” growth for itself. Had we followed Cincinnati and Cleveland’s development patterns, places like Minerva Park, Polaris, etc. would be suburbs of their own (or parts of even larger suburbs–note that Worthington didn’t make the list).

    +1 Walker should make an FAQ page and make this or an elaboration on this comment the number one on this FAQ list.

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